Courses

The Department of History’s undergraduate program offers a bachelor’s degree or a Minor in History to students in five concentrations: U.S. History; European History; African, Asian, and Latin American History; History of Science, Technology, Environment, and Medicine (HSTEM); and Public History.

The Department of History’s graduate program offers master’s degrees in the following areas of concentration: Public History, U.S. History, and European History. Additionally, we offer two dual degree programs with a Master of History: Master of Library Science and the Master of Art in Philanthropic Studies. We also offer a minor in History for those enrolled in doctoral programs at IUPUI.

For specific courses offered in a specific semester see the Schedule of Classes at Student Central.

Intro courses

HIST-A 200 Isuues in United States Hist (3 cr.)

HIST-A 200 Isuues in United States Hist (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions,a nd periods.

HIST-A 207 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY (3 cr.)

HIST-A 207 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY (3 cr.) This introductory course surveys the history of Native peoples of North America from the earliest times to the present. It seeks to provide students with a broad understanding of Native American history, prepare students for more advanced course work in Native studies, and enhance students’ understanding of colonialism and American history.

HIST-A 300 Isuues in United States History (3 cr.)

HIST-A 300 Isuues in United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary, but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. PUL=5 May be repeated twice for credit under different topics.

HIST-A 301 Colonial America (3 cr.)

HIST-A 301 Colonial America (3 cr.) Social, cultural, economic, political, and religious developments in colonial America from first contacts between Native Americans and Europeans through the early eighteenth century. Special topics include colonization, migration, slavery, Atlantic trade, and representative government.

HIST-A 302 Revolutionary America (3 cr.)

HIST-A 302 Revolutionary America (3 cr.) Political, economic, religious, social, and cultural history of the American Revolution and the birth of the nation. Special topics cover the nature of the revolution, the experience and effects of the crisis on different members of society, including women, native peoples, and African-Americans, and the meanings of the American Revolution for contemporaries and their descendants.

HIST-A 303 United States, 1789–1865 I (3 cr.)

HIST-A 303 United States, 1789–1865 I (3 cr.) Political, economic, and social growth of the young republic from 1789 through the War of 1812, with particular attention to the first American party system and the expansion of the frontier.

HIST-A 304 United States, 1789–1865 II (3 cr.)

HIST-A 304 United States, 1789–1865 II (3 cr.)  A study of the rapid economic, social and political changes that the United States experienced in this period of disruptive growth.

HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America, 1865–1917 (3 cr.)

HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America, 1865–1917 (3 cr.) Reconstruction, industrialism, immigration, urbanism, culture, foreign policy, progressivism, World War I.

HIST-A 314 United States History, 1917–1945 (3 cr.) 

HIST-A 314 United States History, 1917–1945 (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformations of 1917–1945; World War I, the twenties, the Great Depression, New Deal, World War II.

HIST-A 315 United States History since World War II (3 cr.)

HIST-A 315 United States History since World War II (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformations of 1945 to present: Cold War, problems of contemporary America.

HIST-A 317 American Social History, 1865 to Present (3 cr.)

HIST-A 317 American Social History, 1865 to Present (3 cr.) Changing living conditions, values, concerns in post-Civil War United States as influenced by rise of the city and seen in experience of rural-urban migrants, ethnic groups, industrial workers, women, blacks. Focus on situations faced by ordinary people, and how present tensions have roots in the past.

HIST-A 325 American Constitutional History I (3 cr.)

HIST-A 325 American Constitutional History I (3 cr.) 1607-1865.  Changing constitutional system from seventeenth-century colonies to contemporary nations. Structure of government: federalism, division of powers, political institutions. Relationship of government to society and economy. Civil liberties and democracy. Constitutional law and politics.

HIST-A 326 American Constitutional History II (3 cr.)

HIST-A 326 American Constitutional History II (3 cr.) I: 1607-1865. II: 1865-present. Changing constitutional system from seventeenth-century colonies to contemporary nations. Structure of government: federalism, division of powers, political institutions. Relationship of government to society and economy. Civil liberties and democracy. Constitutional law and politics.

HIST-A 327 American Legal History I (3 cr.)

HIST-A 327 American Legal History I (3 cr.) Examines the development of United States law from English antecedents through the American Civil War. Course imparts substantial knowledge of American legal history and understanding of methods of historical and legal inquiry.

HIST-A 328 History of Work in America (3 cr.)

HIST-A 328 History of Work in America (3 cr.) Examines the major transformations in the lives of American working people from the colonial era to modern times. The course explores shifting patterns of work, working class life and community, organized labor movements, and the relationship of workers and unions to the state.

HIST-A 329 American Dissent (3 cr.)

HIST-A 329 American Dissent (3 cr.) This course will examine popular movements for social, economic, and political change in U.S. history. Emphasis will be on: evaluating different approaches to the study of collective action; understanding the social, political, and cultural contexts from which protest developed; and uncovering what protest movements reveal about the nature of American society and politics.

HIST-A 341 United States Women’s History I (3 cr.) 

HIST-A 341 United States Women’s History I (3 cr.) The social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political, and demographic history of women in the United States from the period before European settlement to the present. Topics include the variety in women’s experiences; the worlds in which women lived; the relationship between the private and public realms; and changes and continuities over time.

HIST-A 342 United States Women’s History II (3 cr.) 

HIST-A 342 United States Women’s History II (3 cr.) The social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political, and demographic history of women in the United States from the period before European settlement to the present. Topics include the variety in women’s experiences; the worlds in which women lived; the relationship between the private and public realms; and changes and continuities over time.

HIST-A 343 Lincoln: The Man and the Myth (3 cr.) 

HIST-A 343 Lincoln: The Man and the Myth (3 cr.) This class will explore the life and the myth of Abraham Lincoln. Students will read scholarly and popular works about Lincoln’s life, view films about Lincoln, and study how museums, historic sites, and art interpret/portray his life.

HIST-A 344 The Gilded Age (3 cr.)

HIST-A 344 The Gilded Age (3 cr.) This course will study the response of the American people and their institutions to the opportunities and problems of the late nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to: the rise of Big Business; labor organization; immigration; regular, reform, and radical politics; disappearance of the frontier; the farm crisis; and the rise of imperialism. An important feature of this course will be the introduction to the class of important issues in the historical interpretation of the late nineteenth century.

HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.)

HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.) Evolution of cities and urban life in the United States from colonial times to the present. Rise of cities (New York, Chicago, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Miami, and others). Creation of modern urban districts (ghettos, suburbia), city planning, political and economic power structures, ethnic and race relations, law and order (crime, police, prisons).

HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.)

HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) The era of the Civil War and its aftermath. Military, political, economic, and social aspects of the coming of the war, the war years, and the “reconstruction” era following the conflict.

HIST-A 355 African-American History I (3 cr.)

HIST-A 355 African-American History I (3 cr.) History of black Americans beginning with their West African background, and including the slave trade, slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the consequences of Reconstruction’s failure.

HIST-A 356 African-American History II (3 cr.)

HIST-A 356 African-American History II (3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States 1900 to present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom movement.

HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.)

HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) Indiana history and life, from early human interactions to our own time.  Emphasis on the relationship of distinctive regional traits and challenges to broader transformations in American and global culture.

HIST-A 372 History of Indiana II (3 cr.)

HIST-A 372 History of Indiana II (3 cr.) Recounts the history of Indiana in the period since 1865, tracing the development of a modern industrial commonwealth – agriculture, industry, politics, society, education and the arts.

HIST-A 376 Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (3 cr.)

HIST-A 376 Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (3 cr.) This course will examine the private life as well as the public career of 19th-century African American Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). This course will focus on assessing Douglass’s historical significance as a slave, abolitionist, Civil War recruiter, politician, civil rights leader, and diplomat. It also will consider the degree that Douglass’s individual experiences shed light on the problem of race in American history.

HIST-A 410 American Environmental History (3 cr.)

HIST-A 410 American Environmental History (3 cr.) This course develops an environmental context for American history by analyzing the diverse and changing interactions between Americans and the environment in which they have lived.

HIST-A 421 Topics in United States History (3 cr.)

HIST-A 421 Topics in United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected themes, topics, or problems in the history of Europe. The course will emphasize general and/or broad themes or topics; the themes or topics will vary from one semester to another.  This course may be repeated three (3) times for credit under differing topics.

HIST-B 309 Britain before 1688 (3 cr.)

HIST-B 309 Britain before 1688 (3 cr.) Initially, this course will explore the formation of Britain through the process of cultural and ethnic layering. We will discuss this process, which included Bronze Age peoples, Celts, romans, Teutonic peoples and Scandinavians. The course will then focus on the development of political and socio-economic institutions in England, as well as on major events which shaped England, Scotland and Wales into the powerful political entity we know as Great Britain.

HIST-B 310 Britain since 1688 (3 cr.) 

HIST-B 310 Britain since 1688 (3 cr.) This course examines important modern political, economic, social, and cultural developments including industrialization and imperialism and the emergence of ideologies like liberalism and socialism.

HIST-B 351 Western Europre-Early Middle Age (3 cr.)

HIST-B 351 Western Europre-Early Middle Age (3 cr.) Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity and Germanic invasions through Charlemagne’s Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture.

HIST-B 352 West Europe-High/Late Middle Ages (3 cr.)

HIST-B 352 West Europe-High/Late Middle Ages (3 cr.) Expansion of European culture and institutions: chivalry, the Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent changes in late medieval Europe; over population, plague, Hundred Years’ War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition, and heresy.

HIST-B 353 The Renaissance (3 cr.)

HIST-B 353 The Renaissance (3 cr.) Italian Renaissance as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western civilization. Its roots in antiquity and the Middle Ages; its characteristic expression in literature, art, learning, social transformation, manners, and customs. Expansion of Renaissance into France, Germany, and England.

HIST-B 354 The Reformation (3 cr.)

HIST-B 354 The Reformation (3 cr.) Economic, political, social, and religious background of Protestant Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and theological trends; Catholic Reformation.

HIST-B 355 Europe: Louis XIV to French Revolution (3 cr.)

HIST-B 355 Europe: Louis XIV to French Revolution (3 cr.) Absolutism to enlightened despotism; the European state and its authority in fiscal, judicial, and military affairs; sources, content, diffusion of the Enlightenment; agriculture, commerce, and industry in preindustrial economies; Old Regime France.

HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.)

HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.) P: H114 or consent of instructor. Crisis of Old Regime; middle-class and popular revolt; from constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the terror and revolutionary government; expansion of revolution in Europe; rise and fall of Napoleonic Empire.

HIST-B 357 Modern France (3 cr.) 

HIST-B 357 Modern France (3 cr.) A social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.) 

HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.) Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to 1930. Origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression.

HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II (3 cr.)

HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II (3 cr.) Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1930 to present.  Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German National Socialism. World War II; cold war; postwar reconstruction and recovery.

HIST-B 384 European Intellectual History II (3 cr.)

HIST-B 384 European Intellectual History II (3 cr.) Critical examination and analysis of the historical, psychological, social, and scientific roots of the thought of leading European thinkers from the nineteenth through twentieth centuries. Thematic developments, as well as individual thinkers and particular problems, are emphasized.

HIST-B 393 German History: From Bismarck to Hitler (3 cr.)

HIST-B 393 German History: From Bismarck to Hitler (3 cr.) Analysis of the major social, political, and cultural developments in Germany from the middle of the 19th through the middle of the 20th centuries. The basic theme is the tragic failure of liberalism and democracy to assert themselves against the entrenched forces of militarism nd nationalism. Not open to students who have had HIST-B 377-B378.

HIST-B 421 Topics in European History (3 cr.)

HIST-B 421 Topics in European History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical themes and/or problems in European history. Topics will vary from semester to semester.  This course may be repeated three (3) times for credit under differing topics.

HIST-B 425 The Second World War (3 cr.)

HIST-B 425 The Second World War (3 cr.) Beginning with its origins in the peace settlement of 1919, this course examines the social, cultural, and economic impact of the Second World War, as well as the war aims and strategies of the major combatants.

HIST-B 426 Genocide and Its Origins (3 cr.)

HIST-B 426 Genocide and Its Origins (3 cr.) Beginning with the sixteenth-century discovery of the “New World” and ending with “ethnic cleansing” in the twenty-first century, this course will examine the intellectual, political, economic, social, and ideological dynamics driving the rise of mass murder as an instrument of state policy.

HIST-C 386 Greek History-Minoans to Alexander (3 cr.)

HIST-C 386 Greek History-Minoans to Alexander (3 cr.) Political, social, and economic developments in Greek world from the bronze age through the fourth century: Trojan War, Persian Wars, Periclean Athens, Sparta, archaeological and literary sources.

HIST-C 388 Roman History (3 cr.)

HIST-C 388 Roman History (3 cr.) History of Roman people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D. 565), illustrating development from city-state to world empire, Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from early kingship to republican forms, finally by monarchy of distinatively Roman type.

HIST-D 314 Soviet Social and Cultural History (3 cr.)

HIST-D 314 Soviet Social and Cultural History (3 cr.) Study of the history and dynamics of Soviet society and culture, their interaction, and their influence on Soviet politics. Among the specific topics covered will be the Party, women, dissidents, the Jews and other minorities, literature, and art.

HIST-E 432 History of Africa II (3 cr.)

HIST-E 432 History of Africa II (3 cr.) 1750 to present. The slave trade and its abolition; European imperialism and colonial rule; impact of Islam and Christianity; nationalism and the struggle for independence; reassertion of African culture and identity; development issues.

HIST-F 300 Issues in Latin American History (3 cr.)

HIST-F 300 Issues in Latin American History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary but usually cut across fields, regions, and period.

HIST-F 341 Latin America: Conquest and Empire (3 cr.)

HIST-F 341 Latin America: Conquest and Empire (3 cr.) The colonial period: Spanish, Portuguese, Indian, and African backgrounds; discovery, conquest, and settlement; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural life; the movement toward independence.

HIST-F 342 Latin America: Evolution and Revolution since Independence (3 cr.)

HIST-F 342 Latin America: Evolution and Revolution since Independence (3 cr.) Hispanic America since independence, with emphasis on common problems of nation building in multi-racial former colonial societies; latifundia; dependency relationships; impact of industrialization; the conservative and revolutionary responses; 1810-present.

HIST-F 346 Modern Mexico (3 cr.)

HIST-F 346 Modern Mexico (3 cr.) Places contemporary Mexico in historical perspective, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include nineteenth-century social and political movements, the causes and consequences of the 1910 revolution, the formation of Mexico’s political system, problems of economic growth, and the changing patterns of gender, class, and ethnicity in Mexican society.

HIST-F 347 History of United States–Latin American Relations (3 cr.)

HIST-F 347 History of United States–Latin American Relations (3 cr.) This course examines the history of diplomatic, economic, and cultural relations between the United States and Latin America from the late 1700s to the present.

HIST-G 451 The Far East I (3 cr.)

HIST-G 451 The Far East I (3 cr.) Social, cultural, political, and economic development from ancient to modern times, including China, Japan, Korea, Indo-China, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

HIST-G 452 The Far East II (3 cr.) 

HIST-G 452 The Far East II (3 cr.) This course offers a brief survey of the civilization of Asia that includes selected topics related to China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, and/or India in modern times.

HIST-G 461 Imperial China (3 cr.) 

HIST-G 461 Imperial China (3 cr.) This course offers a brief survey of the civilization of traditional China. The emphasis of the lectures is on the development of the social structure, the political system, and Confucian culture.

HIST-G 485 Modern China (3 cr.)

HIST-G 485 Modern China (3 cr.) A survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies.

HIST-H 100 Introduction to History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 100 Introduction to History (3 cr.) An introduction to history and historical thinking is essential for understanding the diversity of our own society and culture as well as the diversity of the global community in which we live today.  This course is designed to develop and test the students’ understanding of society and culture. This is a course that by design focuses on the creation of meaning in the past, and how that creation of meaning in the past relates to present-day meanings.

HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.)

HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.) Covers English colonization through the Civil War period.  Evolution of American society: political, economic social structure; racial and ethnic groups, sex roles; Indian, inter-American, and world diplomacy of United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history.

HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.)

HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.) 1865 to present.  Evolution of American society: political, economic social structure; racial and ethnic groups, sex roles; Indian, inter-American, and world diplomacy of United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history.

HIST-H 108 Perspectives on the World to 1800 (3 cr.)

HIST-H 108 Perspectives on the World to 1800 (3 cr.) Survey of major global developments to the 18th century; European voyages of discovery, colonization of western hemisphere, penetration of Mughal India, Ming China, and sub-Saharan Africa. Role of revolutions, i.e. Scientific, industrial, social and political (American and French) in establishment of European hegemony in western hemisphere and Asia.

HIST-H 109 Perspectives on the World since 1800 (3 cr.) 

HIST-H 109 Perspectives on the World since 1800 (3 cr.) Survey of major global developments from the 19th century to the present: European imperial rule in India, China, Japan, Middle-East, and Africa. Chinese revolution (1912), Mexican revolutions (1911), World War I and II, end of European hegemony. Emergence of new nations in Asia, Africa, and Middle-East. Global inter-dependence as basic theme of 20th century.

HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.)

HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) Ancient civilization, Germanic Europe, feudalism, medieval church, national monarchies, Renaissance.

HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.)

HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church; feudalism; national monarchies, Industrial Revolution, capitalism and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, international rivalries, wars.

HIST-H 195 Introduction to Digital Humanities (3 cr.)

HIST-H 195 Introduction to Digital Humanities (3 cr.) Introduction to Digital Humanities introduces students to the study of digital humanities emphasizing the major issues in the computational study of humanities fields and highlights how the digital and the humanities intersect.

HIST-H 217 The Nature of History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 217 The Nature of History (3 cr.) An introductory examination of (1) what history is, (2) types of historical interpretation, (3) common problems of historians, and (4) the uses of history.

HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.) From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized with some attention to other armed forces.

HIST-H 225 Special Topics in History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 225 Special Topics in History (3 cr.) Special Topics in History.   This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

HIST-H 227 AFRICAN CIVILIZATIONS (3 cr.)

HIST-H 227 AFRICAN CIVILIZATIONS (3 cr.) Introduction to African culture; African environment; early humans in Africa; pre-colonial history; traditional political, economic and social systems; language, religion, art, music, literature.

HIST-H 300 Topics in History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 300 Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods.  May be repeated with different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

HIST-H 364 History of Medicine and Public Health (3 cr.)

HIST-H 364 History of Medicine and Public Health (3 cr.) History of medicine and public health in Europe and America, including ancient and medieval background, with focus on the development of modern health sciences since 1800.

HIST-H 373 History of Science and Technology I (3 cr.)

HIST-H 373 History of Science and Technology I (3 cr.) Study of the development of pure and applied science from prehistoric times to the Scientific Revolution, with emphasis on principles, technical aspects, relationships between the sciences; the evolution of major scientific disciplines and the effects on other institutions and world views.

HIST-H 374 History of Science and Technology II (3 cr.)

HIST-H 374 History of Science and Technology II (3 cr.) An in-depth study of scientific and technological developments from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Special emphasis on transportation, communication, military and medical technology, physics, biology, and astronomy and on the figures involved in key breakthroughs. Consideration of governmental involvement in science.

HIST-H 375 Machines and the Age of Invention (3 cr.)

HIST-H 375 Machines and the Age of Invention (3 cr.) The history of invention and the industrialization of Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with the economic, social, demographic, and intellectual changes that resulted.

HIST-H 411 Historical Editing (3 cr.)

HIST-H 411 Historical Editing (3 cr.) Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of historical editing, with emphasis on the processes of editing historical documents and the publications of history-related organizations. Attention given to technical skills (copyediting, proofreading) as well as broader professional issues (ethics, the editor-author relationship, evolution of editorial standards).

HIST-H 412 Historic Preservation (3 cr.) 

HIST-H 412 Historic Preservation (3 cr.) Introduction to the history, theory, and legal and ethical bases for preservation of the built environment. Attention will be given to architectural history, methodology (site-specific research, contextual research) as well as professional issues such as who preserves, what should be preserved, and the role of the historian in making choices.

HIST-H 418 History of International Humanitarian Assistance (3 cr.)

HIST-H 418 History of International Humanitarian Assistance (3 cr.) This course covers the history of international humanitarian assistance during the 19th and 20th centuries. Its focus is on the movements and activities that developed in wealthier countries (Europe and the U.S.) which attempted to help those in other lands in need of assistance (e.g., food, shelter, medical care), as a result of a variety of causes, both natural and man-made, such as famine, flood, epidemics, earthquakes and volcanoes as well as wars and government oppression. The responses took many forms, governmental and nongovernmental, in a world that underwent very dramatic changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIST-H 421 Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 421 Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and/or problems in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester.  This course may be taken a total of three (3) times for credit under different topics.

HIST-H 425 Topics in History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods.   This course may be taken a total of four (4) times for credit under different topics.

HIST-H 432 Pop Cultures/African Cities (3 cr.) 

HIST-H 432 Pop Cultures/African Cities (3 cr.) This course will focus on the interdependence between the development of the colonial and postcolonial city and the emergence of popular cultures in Africa. Cultures such as music, fashion, and sports will be studied in their recreational aspects as well as for their social and political implication.

HIST-H 477 British Imperialism, 1485–Present (3 cr.) 

HIST-H 477 British Imperialism, 1485–Present (3 cr.) Comparative course focusing on the various geographical regions absorbed into the British empire between 1485 and the present. It explores the experience of empire in the Americas, the Pacific, India, Africa, and the Middle East through a variety of primary and secondary materials.

HIST-H 480 Comparative Native American History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 480 Comparative Native American History (3 cr.) Course examines history of native peoples in North America during both the colonial and republican periods through a comparative perspective of the Spanish/French/British empires and then the post-colonial periods of US and Mexican history.

Advanced courses

HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.)

HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.) Selected topics in history. Closed to freshmen and sophomores.

HIST-K 493 Reading for Honors (1-3 cr.) 

HIST-K 493 Reading for Honors (1-3 cr.) P: Approval of department honors committee prior to registration. Individual readings on selected topics.

HIST-K 495 Readings in History (1-3 cr.)

HIST-K 495 Readings in History (1-3 cr.) By arrangement with instructor. Permission of departmental chairperson required.

HIST-G 585 Modern China (3 cr.)

HIST-G 585 Modern China (3 cr.) China from the Ch’ing period to the present. Social, political, and economic change in a largely agrarian society. International and intercultural relations as well as rebellion, war, and revolution during the unstable nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIST-H 500 History of Historical Thought (4 cr.) 

HIST-H 500 History of Historical Thought (4 cr.) Approaches to the historian’s craft and reflections on history as a type of scholarly thinking. Recommended for new graduate students and others interested in history as a branch of knowledge. With the consent of the director of graduate studies, may be repeated for credit when the instructor differs.

HIST-H 501 Historical Methodology (4 cr.)

HIST-H 501 Historical Methodology (4 cr.) Discussion and application of the various methods and strategies used in historical research.

HIST-H 509 Special Topics in European History (3 cr.) 

HIST-H 509 Special Topics in European History (3 cr.) Study of topics in European history. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST-H 511 Special Topics in American History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 511 Special Topics in American History (3 cr.) Study of topics in American history. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST-H 516 History of Philanthropy in the United States (3 cr.)

HIST-H 516 History of Philanthropy in the United States (3 cr.) Approaches philanthropy as a social relation between various groups and looks at issues ranging from the relationship between government and the economy to African-American activism to women’s roles. Explores past and current debates about such issues in order to analyze the past, understand the present, and shape the future.

HIST-H 518 History of International Humanitarian Assistance (3 cr.)

HIST-H 518 History of International Humanitarian Assistance (3 cr.) This course covers the history of international humanitarian assistance during the 19th and 20th centuries. Its focus is on the movements and activities that developed in wealthier countries (Europe and the U.S.) which attempted to help those in other lands in need of assistance (e.g., food, shelter, medical care), as a result of a variety of causes, both natural and man-made, such as famine, flood, epidemics, earthquakes and volcanoes as well as wars and government oppression. The responses took many forms, governmental and nongovernmental, in a world that underwent very dramatic changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIST-H 521 Special Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 521 Special Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., traditional Asia, modern Asia. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

HIST-H 542 Public History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 542 Public History (4 cr.) The application of history to public needs and public programs. Historic preservation, archival management, oral history, editing, public humanities programming, historical societies, etc.

HIST-H 543 Practicum in Public History (1-4 cr.)

HIST-H 543 Practicum in Public History (1-4 cr.) P: or C: HIST-H 542. Internships in public history programs, fieldwork, or research in the historical antecedents of contemporary problems.

HIST-H 546 Special Topics in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (3 cr.)

HIST-H 546 Special Topics in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (3 cr.) Study of topics in the history of science, medicine, and technology. May be repeated for credit with permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

HIST-H 547 Special Topics in Public History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 547 Special Topics in Public History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in public history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., historic preservation, archival practice, material history, local and community history, digital humanities, and historical editing. May be repeated once for credit.

HIST-H 548 Historical Administration (3 cr.)

HIST-H 548 Historical Administration (3 cr.) This course presents an overview of issues faced by administrators and mid-level managers who work in museums, historical societies, archives, special collection libraries, and other cultural resource agencies. Topics, speakers, and readings focus on issues that are unique to agencies that collect, preserve, and interpret historical resources.

HIST-H 565 Introduction to Digital Public History (3 cr.)

HIST-H 565 Introduction to Digital Public History (3 cr.) This course examines the practice of historical research. It explores cutting edge ways to do historical analysis when intended for a public audience. Our course will be an overview of the variety of types of digital history tools, technologies, methods, and approaches that are useful for public historians.

HIST-H 615 Colloquium: Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 615 Colloquium: Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.) These colloquia are seminar size and involve oral and written study of the problems bibliographies, interpretations, and research trends in the fields with which they respectively deal; they are the chief means by which a study becomes knowledgeable in history at a professional level and prepares for the doctoral qualifying Examination.

HIST-H 620 Colloquium: Modern Western European History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 620 Colloquium: Modern Western European History (4 cr.) These colloquia are seminar size and involve oral and written study of the problems, bibliographies, interpretations, and research trends in the fields with which they respectively deal; they are the chief means by which a student becomes knowledgeable in history at a professional level and prepares for the doctoral Qualifying Examination.

HIST-H 650 Colloquium: United States History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 650 Colloquium: United States History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 699 Colloquium: Comparative History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 699 Colloquium: Comparative History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 715 Seminar: Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 715 Seminar: Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.) These courses involve research of a mature level with primary sources in specialized topics and problems in the field with which they respectively deal. They train the student in historical scholarship.

HIST-H 720 Seminar: Modern Western European History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 720 Seminar: Modern Western European History (4 cr.) These courses involve research of a mature level with primary sources in specialized topics and problems in the field with which they respectively deal. They train the student in historical scholarship.

HIST-H 750 Seminar in United States History (4 cr.)

HIST-H 750 Seminar in United States History (4 cr.)