Undergraduate Program Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Creative Writing Courses

  • ENG-W 206 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 cr.)
    Provides students with the opportunity to develop their creative writing skills and gives them a working knowledge of the basic principles of fiction, poetry and drama.
  • ENG-W 207 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.)
    An introduction to the techniques and principles of fiction writing. Written assignments, workshop discussions of student work in progress, seminar study of classic and contemporary examples of the genre. This course may be used as a prerequisite for ENG W301, ENG W302, or ENG W305. This course is recommended for English majors pursuing a concentration in creative writing.
  • ENG-W 208 Introduction to Poetry Writing (3 cr.)
    One of three introductory creative writing courses, the course focuses on the fundamentals of poetry writing exclusively, including the image, the line, metaphor, sound play, and poetic meter. Students will practice a variety of techniques, will engage in weekly reading and writing, and will learn to revise their own poems and to help edit their classmates’ work.
  • ENG-W 280 Literary Editing and Publishing (3 cr.)
    P: Any literature course; ENG-W 206, ENG-W 207, or ENG-W 208. Principles of editing and publishing literary writing. Kinds of journals, varieties of formats (including print and e-zine), introduction to editing and production processes. Possible focus on genre publishing (fiction, poetry, non-fiction prose), grant writing, Web publishing, etc.
  • ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 207 or permission of the instructor. Further exploration in the art of fiction writing. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 302 Screenwriting (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 207, or permission of instructor. A practical course in basic techniques of writing for film and television. Covers the essentials of dramatic structure, story development, characterization and theme, scene construction, dialogue, and, briefly, the practicalities of working as a screenwriter today.
  • ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 208 or permission of the instructor. Further exploration in the art of poetry writing.
  • ENG-W 305 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 206, ENG-W 207, ENG-W 208, or permission of the instructor. An intermediate course in the theory and practice of creative nonfiction prose, with seminar study of relevant materials and workshop discussion of student work in progress.
  • ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.)
    An introduction to the logical foundation and rhetorical framework of effective writing.
  • ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.)
    Students will examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent.
  • ENG-W 401 Writing Fiction (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 301. Study and practice in the writing of fiction. Analysis of examples from contemporary literature accompanies class criticism and discussion. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 403 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 303. Study and practice in the writing of poetry. Analysis of examples from contemporary poets accompanies class criticism and discussion.
  • ENG-W 407 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 305. An advanced workshop in the craft of creative nonfiction, with special attention given to defining the genre and its craft.
  • ENG-W 408 Creative Writing for Teachers (3 cr.)
    Offers current and future teachers insights into the creative writing process, teaches them to think as writers do, suggests strategies for critiquing creative work, and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum.
  • ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.)
    P: Consent of instructor. Individual projects determined in consultation with instructor. Credit varies with scope of project. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 426 Writing for Popular and Professional Publication (3 cr.)
    Offers experienced writers near the end of their academic careers the opportunity to apply their skills to the public writing of the workplace. Students in this Honors course will integrate and apply academic writing skills gained from their previous academic work. They will compose documents appropriate for business and organizational purposes and explore the marketing process for freelance writing. Application of this “real-life” writing comes when ENG-W 426 students receive assignments from university units such as the University College and the School of Liberal Arts and fulfill them for inclusion in university publications.
  • ENG-Z 206 Introduction to Language Use (3 cr.)
    An introduction to how we use language in our lives. This course explores how and why language varies between different groups and places, as well as the role of context in language meaning and interpretation. Insights are applied to understanding the impact of literature, film, writing, and other disciplines.
  • ENG-Z 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. A study of the origins of the English language, focusing on how and why English has changed over time. Topics include: the process of language standardization and its impact on education and literacy, relationships between language and literature, and the changing role of English around the world.
  • ENG-Z 302 Understanding Language Structure: Syntax (3 cr.)
    R: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. An introduction to how language is organized at the sentence level, focusing on what it means to know how to produce and understand grammatical sentences. The acquisition of syntax by children learning their first language and non-native speakers learning a second language will be studied.
  • ENG-Z 310 Language in Context: Sociolinguistics (3 cr.)
    R: ENG-Z 206 is recommended. This course explores the relationships among language, society, and culture. The interplay between social factors such as age, sex, status, class, and education and language use are discussed within the framework of various theoretical and methodological approaches. Perceptions of several varieties of English are investigated.

English Elective Courses

  • ENG-L 105 Appreciation of Literature (3 cr.)An introduction to drama, fiction, and poetry, stressing the enjoyment and the humane values of each form. The course will provide experiences in listening to and studying visual adaptations of poems, novels, and dramas.
  • ENG-L 115 Literature for Today (3 cr.)
    P: W131. Poems, dramas, and narratives pertinent to concerns of our times: e.g., works concerning values of the individual and society, problems of humanism in the modern world, and conflicts of freedom and order.
  • ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.)
    Representative significant plays to acquaint students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature. Readings may include plays from several ages and countries.
  • ENG-L 204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.)
    Representative works of fiction; structural technique in the novel, theories and kinds of fiction, and thematic scope of the novel. Readings may include novels and short stories from several ages and countries.
  • ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.)
    A basic course that will enable students to talk and write about poetry.
  • ENG-L 208 Topics in English and American Literature and Culture (3 cr.)
    Selected works of English and/or American literature in relation to a single cultural problem or theme. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 213 Literary Masterpieces I (3 cr.)
    Literary masterpieces from Homer to the present. Aims at thoughtful, intensive reading, appreciation of aesthetic values, enjoyment of reading.
  • ENG-L 214 Literary Masterpieces II (3 cr.)
    ENG-L 214 covers major Western literary works from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Texts are selected from a variety of genres and nations, with an emphasis on works that have been particularly famous and influential. Works by Cervantes, Voltaire, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Mann, Ibsen, Kafka, and others are typically included. Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills. Non-English works will be read in English translation.
  • ENG-L 245 Introduction to Caribbean Literature (3 cr.)
    This course will introduce students to the basic themes of Caribbean literature. Specifically, we will examine the ways in which Caribbean writers present a colonial past and its effect on Caribbean culture in their attempts to “write back” to imperial thought. We will examine the politics of decolonization and how writers construct/reconstruct Caribbean cultures and identities.
  • ENG-L 305 Chaucer (3 cr.)
    Chaucer’s works with special emphasis on The Canterbury Tales.
  • ENG-L 355 American Novel: Cooper to Dreiser (3 cr.)
    Representative nineteenth-century American novels.
  • ENG-L 363 American Drama (3 cr.)
    Main currents in American drama to the present.
  • ENG-L 365 Modern Drama: Continental (3 cr.)
    Special attention to Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Hauptmann, Pirandello, Brecht, and Sartre and to the theatre of the absurd.
  • ENG-L 366 Modern Drama: English, Irish, and American (3 cr.)
    Twentieth-century drama, from Bernard Shaw and Eugene O’Neill to Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Marsha Norman, and August Wilson.
  • ENG-L 372 Contemporary American Fiction (3 cr.)
    American fiction of the last twenty years, including such writers as Bellow, Barth, Didion, Malamud, Pynchon, and Updike.
  • ENG-L 373 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature I (3 cr.)
    Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature, 1890 to the present. Topics may vary and include, for example, Freud and literature, responses to revolution, and the literature of technology.
  • ENG-L 376 Literature for Adolescents (3 cr.)
    A survey of the challenging, sometimes controversial, literature written about and for young adult readers. A wide range of readings, with discussion topics that include “problem” fiction, fantasy and escapism, and censorship. This course is for future teachers and for others interested in the complex phenomenon of coming of age.
  • ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.)
    Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English.
  • ENG-L 384 Studies in American Culture (3 cr.)
    Study of a coherent period of American culture (such as the Revolution, the Progressive Era, the Depression), with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual milieu. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 385 Science Fiction (3 cr.)
    A survey of the literary and cultural developments in British and American science fiction from its origins to the present with emphasis upon such Golden Age writers as Asimov and Heinlein, such post-World War II writers as Sturgeon and Clarke, and such New Wave writers as Ellison and Moorcock.
  • ENG-L 390 Children’s Literature (3 cr.)
    Survey of a wide range (folk tales, fantasy, realistic fiction, poetry and picture books) of literature for children from the early years to junior high school. Readings from the classics of previous centuries and from the best modern works will be treated from the literary-critical perspective, from which pedagogical conclusions follow. Intended for English majors, for the general students, for teachers past and future, and for parents and librarians.
  • ENG-L 394 Film as Literature (3 cr.)
    The course approaches the analysis of films through the cinematic equivalents of the tools of literary criticism. It will introduce students to the elements of filmmaking and the methods of literary analysis as a way of reaching an understanding of how films mean.
  • ENG-L 431 Topics in Literary Study (3 cr.)
    Study of characteristics and development of literary forms or modes (e.g., studies in narrative, studies in romanticism). Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 495 Individual Readings in English (1-3 cr.)
    P: Consent of instructor and departmental chair. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 230 Science Writing (3 cr.)
    Instruction in preparing scientific reports, proposals, visuals, and research projects with instruction in CBE documentation and style.
  • ENG-W 260 Writing for Film Criticism (3 cr.)
    Viewing and critiquing currently playing films, with emphasis on genre, authorship, and cinematic and narrative values. Attention to cultural, historical, and ideological contexts. Students view contemporary films. This is a writing course, which teaches the writing of film criticism; students produce first drafts, present them to classmates for peer reviewing, and complete a final draft for grading. Essays spanning film history serve as models for review writing.
  • ENG-W 262 Style and Voice for Writers (3 cr.)
    This multi-genre course focuses on developing students’ ability to develop strong written voices by examining published authors stylistic strategies, applying them to students’ own work. Students built awareness thereby of unique features of their own stylistic decision-making which stamp their written voices.
  • ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.)
    An introduction to the logical foundation and rhetorical framework of effective writing.
  • ENG-W 312 Writing Biography (3 cr.)
    Students will learn to write about other peoples’ lives, conducting primary and secondary research.& Genres produced may include obituary and profile, and students may have the opportunity to work in archives and write for publication.
  • ENG-W 313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose (3 cr.)
    P: At least one 200-level writing course or excellent performance in ENG-W 131 and/or ENG-W 132 (contact the instructor if you are unsure of your readiness for this course). Students will read and analyze professional and student work as they prepare to practice the art of fact by combining the tools of a researcher with the craft of a novelist. The final portfolio includes a stylistic analysis of the student’s and others’ nonfiction works as well as two illustrated nonfiction texts based on the student’s primary and secondary research.
  • ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web (3 cr.)
    Introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers -hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing -and explores what impact these new forms have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.
  • ENG-W 318 Finding your E-Voice (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 131. This course helps students understand and negotiate the creation of a successful e-voice with academic, personal, and professional applications. Reading, exploration, discussions activities and practice help students transition from an academic to an “e-voice.”
  • ENG-W 320 Advanced Writing in the Arts and Sciences (3 cr.)
    Features scholarly readings on various interdisciplinary topics and examines how writers in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences define problems, investigate these problems, and report their findings. Focuses on the study and practice of knowledge-making in different discourse communities with particular attention to the student’s major discipline.
  • ENG-W 326 Nonfiction Writing (3 cr.)
    This course will introduce students to nonfiction writing genres, including feature writing, profiles, reviews, speechwriting, memoir, opinion, blogs, travel writing, and more. Assigned readings will represent multiple genres; students will identify and analyze rhetorical strategies present in those genres. This course will prepare students for W426 and for writing nonfiction in real world settings.
  • ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing (3 cr.)
    Emphasis on proposals, presentations, collaborative and individual reports needed within a business, administrative, or organizational setting. Students discover how the process and products of writing shape organizational culture by studying documents organizations use, from hiring to setting ethical standards, as they communicate both internally and globally.
  • ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.)
    Students will examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent.
  • ENG-W 366 Written Englishes and Cultures (3 cr.)
    Is standard written English fixed and immutable or a living language variety? This course explores the definition, history, and politics of standard written English, the influence of home and community languages, and the uses and representation of linguistic diversity in both fiction and nonfiction texts.
  • ENG-W 367 Writing for Multiple Media (3 cr.)
    Introduces principles and practices of multimedia design and implementation, with emphasis on writing in multimedia contexts. Students will consider ways that new media affect the production and reception of writing and its relationship to other forms of communication.
  • ENG-W 377 Writing for Social Change (3 cr.)
    This course examines how writing is used to promote social change, particularly in the United States. Students apply theoretical perspectives learned in the course to analyze the rhetorical nature of texts associated with organizing and social action and to create their own texts, including texts directed to public officials, the media and organizational texts.
  • ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing and Literacy (3 cr.)
    Various topics in writing and literacy studies. Each offering will specify how the course counts in the major in writing and literacy. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 396 Writing Fellows Training Seminar (3 cr.)
    Course prepares experienced undergraduate writers to peer tutor in the Writing Center.
  • ENG-W 397 Writing Center Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
    This course will introduce student tutors to research and theory on the writing process, revision, and writing centers, which assumed an important place in composition studies, as writing centers have been an entry point into the field for many scholars/teachers. Areas of focus are scholarship and pedagogy, politics of literacy education and development of reflective tutoring practices.
  • ENG-W 408 Creative Writing for Teachers (3 cr.)
    Offers current and future teachers insights into the creative writing process, teaches them to think as writers do, suggests strategies for critiquing creative work, and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum.
  • ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.)
    P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Individual critical or creative project worked out in collaboration with a member of the staff who agrees before registration to serve as a consultant. Credit varies with scope of project.
  • ENG-W 412 Literacy and Technology (3 cr.)
    Literacy and technology have multifaceted relationships with each other. This course explores the effects of technologies (ranging from clay tablets to the printing press to computers) on literate practices and the teaching of reading and writing. It prepares students to think critically about the possibilities and limitations associated with different technologies and their impact on literacy over time, and to analyze educational uses of technology connected with literacy.
  • ENG-W 426 Writing for Popular and Professional Publication (3 cr.)
    Offers experienced writers near the end of their academic careers the opportunity to apply their skills to the public writing of the workplace. Students in this Honors course will integrate and apply academic writing skills gained from their previous academic work. They will compose documents appropriate for business and organizational purposes and explore the marketing process for freelance writing. Application of this “real-life” writing comes when ENG-W 426 students receive assignments from university units such as the University College and the School of Liberal Arts and fulfill them for inclusion in university publications.

English Studies

  • FILM-C 292 An Introduction to Film (3cr.)
    Nature of film technique and film language; analysis of specific films; major historical, theoretical, and critical developments in film and film study from the beginnings of cinema to the present.
  • ENG-W 206 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 cr.)
    Provides students with the opportunity to develop their creative writing skills and gives them a working knowledge of the basic principles of fiction, poetry and drama.
  • ENG-W 207 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.)
    An introduction to the techniques and principles of fiction writing. Written assignments, workshop discussions of student work in progress, seminar study of classic and contemporary examples of the genre. This course may be used as a prerequisite for ENG W301, ENG W302, or ENG W305. This course is recommended for English majors pursuing a concentration in creative writing.
  • ENG-W 208 Introduction to Poetry Writing (3 cr.)
    One of three introductory creative writing courses, the course focuses on the fundamentals of poetry writing exclusively, including the image, the line, metaphor, sound play, and poetic meter. Students will practice a variety of techniques, will engage in weekly reading and writing, and will learn to revise their own poems and to help edit their classmates’ work.
  • ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life (3 cr.)
    An introduction to the uses of literacy in public and civic discourse, with connections made to theories of writing and professional prospects for writers; serves as the required gateway course for the Concentration in Writing and Literacy and as an exploration of this concentration for other English majors and students considering the possibility of an English major.
  • ENG-W 400 Issues in Teaching Writing (3 cr.)
    Focuses on the content of rhetoric and composition and considers fundamental theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of writing. Reviews rhetorical and compositional principles that influence writing instruction, textbook selection, and curriculum development.
  • ENG-Z 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.)
    This course is an introduction to how language, and English in particular, is structured, including sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax) and meaning (semantics). Discussions focus on examples from everyday language and the application of these basic concepts to real world contexts, including language teaching and learning.
  • ENG-Z 206 Introduction to Language Use (3 cr.)
    An introduction to how we use language in our lives. This course explores how and why language varies between different groups and places, as well as the role of context in language meaning and interpretation. Insights are applied to understanding the impact of literature, film, writing, and other disciplines.

Film Studies

  • FILM-C 292 An Introduction to Film (3 cr.)
    Nature of film technique and film language; analysis of specific films; major historical, theoretical, and critical developments in film and film study from the beginnings of cinema to the present.
  • FILM-C 350 Film Noir (3 cr.)
    Film noir is a term originating with the French to describe certain Hollywood films from the 1940s and 1950s that seem to express a dark vision of American culture. These films often share certain characteristics such as: private detectives; femmes fatale; and dark, shadowy, ambiguous worlds of crime. The term film noir, however, is as shadowy, as amorphous, as the films themselves. Is film noir a period, a genre, a category, or a style of filmmaking? Film scholars and critics don’t always agree on a definition. However we describe them, films noir continue to intrigue and provoke us. This course will look at the historical and cultural use of the term, and some of the detective and pulp fiction that influenced film noir. We will read what several important critics say about noir. We will watch several of the most influential Hollywood films noir made after 1941, including The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Laura, Kiss Me Deadly, and Touch of Evil. In addition, we will look at neo noirs, such as Chinatown, Blade Runner, Pulp Fiction, and Devil in a Blue Dress. Finally, we will think about film noir as a discourse, as a set of ideas circulating around these films, which might tell us something about American culture.
  • FILM-C 351 Musicals (3 cr.)
    Why should we care about this seemingly quaint, esoteric genre in which characters burst into song here in our supposedly advanced era? Musicals are often regarded as in effect a historical genre. They are seen as speaking a dead language (pre-rock Broadwayese and Tin Pan Alley) as breaking the narrative of the classical Hollywood-style film, and of being excessively and cutely associated with show business, fairy tale realms, and folklorish Americana. Musicals are these things, and much more. We will look at the evolution of the one genre that didn’t exist in silent cinema, and how it affected the development of the Hollywood studio system. We’ll sample the works of Busby Berkeley, Astaire, and Rogers, Minnelli, Kelly, and Garland as well as a few of the better Broadway adaptations, as well as a bit of the musical revival that our current decade has had to offer (and that seems to have been successful). We also look at evolutions of the genre in the last three decades, beginning with Cabaret (1972) and extending to mediations on the form like Pennies from Heaven (1981), up to the neo musicals (Moulin Rouge!, Chicago, etc.) of recent times. You’ll come away with a head-pulsing understanding that there couldn’t be cinema and media as we know them without musicals. It’s an essential genre. Students will learn how to talk about and recognize genre in its textual, historical, and cultural aspects. You will learn how to analyze film texts, how to research and think about the evolution of the genre and how to discuss that in a specific film. You will learn how musicals fit into the overall framework of entertainment, film art, and popular culture of the past eighty-some years and how to think critically about them and to analyze and communicate your own responses to the genre.
  • FILM-C 352 Biopics (3 cr.)
    We will study one of the richest, but most underappreciated of film genres, the film biography, better known as the biopic. You will learn to discuss biography as a genre; to assess mythmaking in the telling of lives; to analyze the ways that biographical films work cinematically; and to see how, as a dynamic form, the biopic continues to produce portraits of what it means to distinguish oneself in the world.
  • FILM-C 361 Hollywood Studio Era 1930-1949 (3 cr.)
    This class deals with a vitally important period in film history as related to American history during the Great Depression, World War II, and the immediate postwar years. We will learn the various elements of filmmaking as practiced in a self-contained production system under which each cinematic component–from camerawork to acting to costuming to editing–had a department dedicated to it. We will learn about audiences and moviegoing during a time when movies were the national pastime in America and in many other countries. We will learn how to identify studio style, genre, to analyze the significance of stars and acting codes. We will study the roles of the actor, the writer, the producer, and the director in this system in which talents were signed to long-term contracts and were essentially owned by the companies. In writing, oral discussions, and exams, you should be able to analyze films of the Studio Era on several levels: What do they have to say as products of an American entertainment industry during two turbulent periods in America? What is the “classical cinema” and how does it combine what Richard B. Jewell calls “some standardization” with “a certain amount of freshness, of innovation, of novelty” demanded by the public? How do we recognize house style, individual authorship, and the differences between them? What is genre? And how do we write about and discuss these elements?
  • FILM-C 362 Hollywood in the 1950s (3 cr.)
    This course, the second in a series on the history of the sound film, concerns one of the most critical periods of change both in American life and in the American film as art and entertainment. The late forties and early fifties in America brought the end of two decades of depression and world war and the coming of prosperity, suburbs, the baby boom, the Cold War, television, and the first stirrings of the Civil Rights movement. For Hollywood, the era forced the end of the unified mass audience and with it the breakup of the old powerful studios. Now came the (first) age of the blockbuster, of widescreen and stereophonic sound, of youth films, and Method acting, of a measure of psychological realism, and a new division, however, artificial, between art and entertainment films. The fifties are a fascinating period of reinvention and transition. Television, the blacklist, widescreen, Method acting, psychological realism, the decline of the Production Code, the influence of art cinema; iconic films from “Sunset Blvd.” to “Some Like It Hot,” “Singin’ in the Rain” to “The Searchers,” “Rebel Without a Cause” to “On the Waterfront.”
  • FILM-C 380 French Cinema (3 cr.)
    This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the history of French cinema. France has arguably the most avid, energetic, and versatile film culture of any single nation in the world, including our own. The academic discipline of Film Studies would simply not exist without the French; critics such as Andr’ Bazin, the “auteur” critics of Cahiers du Cin’ma and Positif in the 1950s, and later scholars such as Christian Metz, Raymond Bellour, and Jean-Louis Baudry, who brought semiotics and psychoanalysis in the field were advocates and analysts of the possibilities of film and its meanings in the modern world. Cinema got its formal start in France. The first public film screening anywhere was presented by Pierre and Auguste Lumi’re in Paris on December 28, 1895. Among other French contributions to film culture were the first science fiction/fantasy films (of Georges M’li’s), the wide-screen lens, the idea of film noir, the Auteur Theory, and the Nouvelle Vague (New Wave), which revolutionized film style around the world in the1960s. Students will learn the important styles, periods, and directors of French cinema. They will develop an appreciation for the philosophical and aesthetic ideas informing French film, the cultural and political cultures out of which the films are produced, and the unique cross-pollination between the French and American cinemas.
  • FILM-C 390 The Film and Society: Topics (3 cr.)
    Film and politics; race and gender; social influences of the cinema; rise of the film industry. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • FILM-C 391 The Film: Theory and Aesthetics (3 cr.)
    Film form and techniques; aesthetic and critical theories of the cinema; relationships between film movements and literary and artistic movements; relationships of word and image; analysis of significant motion pictures.
  • FILM-C 392 Genre Study in Film (3 cr.)
    Problems of definition; the evolution of film genres such as criminal or social drama, comedy, the western, science fiction, horror, or documentary film; themes, subject matter, conventions, and iconography peculiar to given genres; relationship of film genres to literary genres. Focus on one specific genre each time the course is offered. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • FILM-C 393 History of European and American Films I (3 cr.)
    FILM-C 393 is a survey of the development of cinema during the period 1895-1926 (the silent film era).
  • FILM-C 394 History of European and American Films II (3 cr.)
    FILM-C 394 is a survey of European and American cinema since 1927. Particular attention paid to representative work of leading filmmakers, emergence of film movements and development of national trends, growth of film industry, and impact of television.
  • FILM-C 491 Authorship and Cinema (3 cr.)
    Study of the work of one or more film artists. Attention paid to the style, themes, and methods that make the filmmaker’s work unique. Filmmakers studied in the contexts of film traditions, ideologies, and industries that informed their work. May be repeated once with a different topic.
  • FILM-C 493 Film Adaptations of Literature (3 cr.)
    Analysis of the processes and problems involved in turning a literary work (novel, play, or poem) into a screenplay and then into a film. Close study of literary and film techniques and short exercises in adaptation.
  • ENG-W 260 Writing of Film Criticism (3 cr.)
    Viewing and critiquing currently playing films, with emphasis on genre, authorship, and cinematic and narrative values. Attention to cultural, historical, and ideological contexts. Students view contemporary films. This is a writing course, which teaches the writing of film criticism; students produce first drafts, present them to classmates for peer reviewing, and complete a final draft for grading. Essays spanning film history serve as models for review writing.
  • ENG-W 302 Screenwriting (3 cr.)
    P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 207, or permission of instructor. A practical course in basic techniques of writing for film and television. Covers the essentials of dramatic structure, story development, characterization and theme, scene construction, dialogue, and, briefly, the practicalities of working as a screenwriter today.

Internship

  • ENG-E 398 Internship in English (3-6 cr.)
    P: Consent of instructor. A supervised internship in the use of English in a workplace. Apply during semester before desired internship.

Language and Linguistics

  • ANTH-L 300 Language and Culture (3 cr.)This course explores the relationships between language and culture, focusing on research methodology and surveying various theoretical frameworks. Topics to be discussed include linguistic relativity (the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis), ethnographies of communication, interview techniques, and methods of data collection and analysis.
  • ASL-L 340 Interpreting Discourse: ASL to English (3 cr.) This course focuses on the analysis of language use in different genres of spoken English so that interpreting students become explicitly aware of everyday language. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze features of conversations, lectures, explanations, interviews, descriptions, and other types of speech genres while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use in English.
  • ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.) An introduction to the logical foundation and rhetorical framework of effective writing.
  • ENG-Z 104 Language in our World (3 cr.) This course explores the power and importance of language in our everyday lives and looks at how language unites and separates us culturally, politically, socially, and psychologically.
  • ENG-Z 204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage (3 cr.) An introduction to English grammar and usage that studies the rhetorical impact of grammatical structures (such as noun phrases, prepositional phrases, and different sentence patterns). This course considers language trends and issues, the role of correctness in discourse communities, and the relations between writing in context and descriptive and prescriptive grammars and usage guides.
  • ENG-Z 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.)This course is an introduction to how language, and English in particular, is structured, including sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax) and meaning (semantics). Discussions focus on examples from everyday language and the application of these basic concepts to real world contexts, including language teaching and learning.
  • ENG-Z 206 Introduction to Language Use (3 cr.)An introduction to how we use language in our lives. This course explores how and why language varies between different groups and places, as well as the role of context in language meaning and interpretation. Insights are applied to understanding the impact of literature, film, writing, and other disciplines.
  • ENG-Z 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.)P: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. A study of the origins of the English language, focusing on how and why English has changed over time. Topics include: the process of language standardization and its impact on education and literacy, relationships between language and literature, and the changing role of English around the world.
  • ENG-Z 302 Understanding Language Structure: Syntax (3 cr.)R: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. An introduction to how language is organized at the sentence level, focusing on what it means to know how to produce and understand grammatical sentences. The acquisition of syntax by children learning their first language and non-native speakers learning a second language will be studied.
  • ENG-Z 303 Understanding Language Meaning: Semantics (3 cr.)Examines the question of meaning, with a focus on the English language. After introducing various approaches to the study of meaning, the course examines how linguistic semantics analyzes such concepts as entities, events, time, space, possibility, and negation, and how these relate to human culture and cognition.
  • ENG-Z 310 Language in Context: Sociolinguistics (3 cr.)R: ENG-Z 206 is recommended. This course explores the relationships among language, society, and culture. The interplay between social factors such as age, sex, status, class, and education and language use are discussed within the framework of various theoretical and methodological approaches. Perceptions of several varieties of English are investigated.
  • ENG-Z 370 Second Language Writing (3 cr.)R: ENG-Z 206 is recommended. The course will consider theories and practices in the teaching and evaluation of second language writing (SLW). It will explore connections between first and second language writing, literacy, culture, and a variety of purposes. Students will learn how to identify writing needs, design tasks, and assess writing, and will form a philosophy of teaching SLW.
  • ENG-Z 405 Topics in the Study of Language (3 cr.)This is a variable topics course in the study of the English Language.
  • ENG-Z 432 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)P: ENG-Z 205. An introduction to a broad range of issues in the field of second language acquisition, providing the student with an overview of the most important approaches to the fundamental questions of how people learn a second language. Provides students with basic knowledge of theories of second language acquisition and an understanding of how theoretical perspectives inform practical application.
  • ENG-Z 434 Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (3 cr.)P: ENG-Z 432 or consent of instructor. The course examines recent theories of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students will get a chance to examine theories and methods and develop knowledge of linguistic resources available to new and/or practicing teachers.
  • ENG-Z 441 Materials Preparation for ESL Instruction (3 cr.)P: ENG-Z 205. Students learn about materials preparation, syllabus design, and test preparation by applying a variety of theories to books and other ESL (English as a Second Language) teaching devices (e.g., ESL tapes, videotapes, and software programs) in order to evaluate their usefulness. Students will learn to evaluate ESL materials for adequacy.

Literary Study

  • ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)AHLA development of critical skills essential to participation in the interpretive process. Through class discussion and focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with historical, generic, and/or cultural concerns.
  • ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.)Issues and approaches to critical study of women writers in British and American literature.
  • ENG-L 220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.)Shakespeare’s best-know plays and poems.
  • ENG-L 301 English Literature Survey I (3 cr.)Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from the beginnings to Swift and Pope.
  • ENG-L 302 English Literature Survey II (3 cr.)Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from the rise of romanticism to the present.
  • ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.)A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare’s major plays.
  • ENG-L 348 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.) Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
  • ENG-L 351 American Literature 1800-1865 (3 cr.) Study of a range of texts from the formative period of the republic to the end of the Civil War. Special attention paid to the shifting definitions and constructions of U.S. American national and cultural identity, as affected by issues of race, environment, transatlantic exchanges, scientific discourse, and the emergence of women writers.
  • ENG-L 352 American Literature 1865-1914 (3 cr.) Surveys American literature through the development of realism, regionalism, naturalism, and the beginnings of modernism. Considers literature’s relation to social and cultural phenomena of this era, such as urbanization, industrialization, immigration, racial tensions, labor strife, changing gender roles, and the spread of mass media and consumer culture.
  • ENG-L 354 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.) Study of modernist and contemporary American writers in various genres, 1914 to the present, including Frost, Stein, Faulkner, O’Connor, Baldwin, Morrison, and others.
  • ENG-L 357 Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3 cr.) Survey of modern and postmodern movements in historical context, including Imagism, Objectivism, and Formalism.
  • ENG-L 358 American Literature 1914-1960 (3 cr.) Survey of literary expressions centered mainly in the first half of the twentieth century. Attention may be given to such literary movements as modernism and the Beats, as well as literature written by women and various ethnic populations.
  • ENG-L 364 Native American Literature (3 cr.) A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian in both native and white literature.
  • ENG-L 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.) A study of the major black American writers, with special emphasis on recent writing.
  • ENG-L 378 Studies in Women and Literature (3 cr.) British and American authors such as George Eliot or Gertrude Stein; groups of authors such as the Bronte sisters or recent women poets; or genres and modes such as autobiography, film, or criticism. Topics will vary by semester.
  • ENG-L 379 American Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr.) A survey of representative authors and works of American ethnic and minority literature with primary focus on Black, Hispanic, and Native Americans.
  • ENG-L 382 Fiction of the Non-Western World (3 cr.) An in-depth study of selected narratives from the fiction of the non-Western world. Focus and selections vary from year to year. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 406 Topics in African American Literature (3 cr.) Focuses on a particular genre, time period, or theme in African American literature. Topics may include twentieth-century African American women’s novels, black male identity in African American literature, or African American autobiography. May be repeated once for credit with different focus.
  • ENG-L 411 Literature and Society (3 cr.) Influence of political, social, and technological trends on literary works. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-W 280 Literary Editing and Publishing (3 cr.) P: Any literature course; ENG-W 206, ENG-W 207, or ENG-W 208. Principles of editing and publishing literary writing. Kinds of journals, varieties of formats (including print and e-zine), introduction to editing and production processes. Possible focus on genre publishing (fiction, poetry, non-fiction prose), grant writing, Web publishing, etc.
  • ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.) Students will examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent.
  • ENG-Z 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to how language, and English in particular, is structured, including sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax) and meaning (semantics). Discussions focus on examples from everyday language and the application of these basic concepts to real world contexts, including language teaching and learning.
  • ENG-Z 206 Introduction to Language Use (3 cr.) An introduction to how we use language in our lives. This course explores how and why language varies between different groups and places, as well as the role of context in language meaning and interpretation. Insights are applied to understanding the impact of literature, film, writing, and other disciplines.
  • ENG-Z 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. A study of the origins of the English language, focusing on how and why English has changed over time. Topics include: the process of language standardization and its impact on education and literacy, relationships between language and literature, and the changing role of English around the world.
  • ENG-Z 302 Understanding Language Structure: Syntax (3 cr.) R: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. An introduction to how language is organized at the sentence level, focusing on what it means to know how to produce and understand grammatical sentences. The acquisition of syntax by children learning their first language and non-native speakers learning a second language will be studied.
  • ENG-Z 310 Language in Context: Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) R: ENG-Z 206 is recommended. This course explores the relationships among language, society, and culture. The interplay between social factors such as age, sex, status, class, and education and language use are discussed within the framework of various theoretical and methodological approaches. Perceptions of several varieties of English are investigated.

Professional and Public Writing

  • ENG-E 398 Internship in English (3-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. A supervised internship in the use of English in a workplace. Apply during semester before desired internship.
  • ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life (3 cr.)An introduction to the uses of literacy in public and civic discourse, with connections made to theories of writing and professional prospects for writers; serves as the required gateway course for the Concentration in Writing and Literacy and as an exploration of this concentration for other English majors and students considering the possibility of an English major. ENG-W 230 Science Writing (3 cr.) Instruction in preparing scientific reports, proposals, visuals, and research projects with instruction in CBE documentation and style.
  • ENG-W 262 Style and Voice for Writers (3 cr.) This multi-genre course focuses on developing students’ ability to develop strong written voices by examining published authors stylistic strategies, applying them to students’ own work. Students built awareness thereby of unique features of their own stylistic decision-making which stamp their written voices.
  • ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.) An introduction to the logical foundation and rhetorical framework of effective writing.
  • ENG-W 313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose (3 cr.)P: At least one 200-level writing course or excellent performance in ENG-W 131 and/or ENG-W 132 (contact the instructor if you are unsure of your readiness for this course). Students will read and analyze professional and student work as they prepare to practice the art of fact by combining the tools of a researcher with the craft of a novelist. The final portfolio includes a stylistic analysis of the student’s and others’ nonfiction works as well as two illustrated nonfiction texts based on the student’s primary and secondary research.
  • ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web (3 cr.)Introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers -hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing -and explores what impact these new forms have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.
  • ENG-W 318 Finding your E-Voice (3 cr.)P: ENG-W 131. This course helps students understand and negotiate the creation of a successful e-voice with academic, personal, and professional applications. Reading, exploration, discussions, activities and practice help students transition from an academic to an “e-voice.”
  • ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing (3 cr.)Emphasis on proposals, presentations, collaborative and individual reports needed within a business, administrative, or organizational setting. Students discover how the process and products of writing shape organizational culture by studying documents organizations use, from hiring to setting ethical standards, as they communicate both internally and globally.
  • ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.) Students will examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent.
  • ENG-W 366 Written Englishes and Cultures (3 cr.) Is standard written English fixed and immutable or a living language variety? This course explores the definition, history, and politics of standard written English, the influence of home and community languages, and the uses and representation of linguistic diversity in both fiction and nonfiction texts. ENG-W 377 Writing for Social Change (3 cr.) This course examines how writing is used to promote social change, particularly in the United States. Students apply theoretical perspectives learned in the course to analyze the rhetorical nature of texts associated with organizing and social action and to create their own texts, including texts directed to public officials, the media and organizational texts.
  • ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing and Literacy (3 cr.) Various topics in writing and literacy studies. Each offering will specify how the course counts in the major in writing and literacy. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 397 Writing Center Theory and Practice (3 cr.)This course will introduce student tutors to research and theory on the writing process, revision, and writing centers, which assumed an important place in composition studies, as writing centers have been an entry point into the field for many scholars/teachers. Areas of focus are scholarship and pedagogy, politics of literacy education and development of reflective tutoring practices.
  • ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (1-3 cr.) Combines study of writing with practical experience of working with professionals in journalism, business communication, or technical writing. Researched reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor and instructor.
  • ENG-W 400 Issues in Teaching Writing (3 cr.) Focuses on the content of rhetoric and composition and considers fundamental theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of writing. Reviews rhetorical and compositional principles that influence writing instruction, textbook selection, and curriculum development.
  • ENG-W 412 Literacy and Technology (3 cr.) Literacy and technology have multifaceted relationships with each other. This course explores the effects of technologies (ranging from clay tablets to the printing press to computers) on literate practices and the teaching of reading and writing. It prepares students to think critically about the possibilities and limitations associated with different technologies and their impact on literacy over time, and to analyze educational uses of technology connected with literacy.
  • ENG-W 426 Writing for Popular and Professional Publication (3 cr.) Offers experienced writers near the end of their academic careers the opportunity to apply their skills to the public writing of the workplace. Students in this Honors course will integrate and apply academic writing skills gained from their previous academic work. They will compose documents appropriate for business and organizational purposes and explore the marketing process for freelance writing. Application of this “real-life” writing comes when ENG-W 426 students receive assignments from university units such as the University College and the School of Liberal Arts and fulfill them for inclusion in university publications.
  • ENG-Z 204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage (3 cr.) An introduction to English grammar and usage that studies the rhetorical impact of grammatical structures (such as noun phrases, prepositional phrases, and different sentence patterns). This course considers language trends and issues, the role of correctness in discourse communities, and the relations between writing in context and descriptive and prescriptive grammars and usage guides.
  • ENG-Z 370 Second Language Writing (3 cr.) R: ENG-Z 206 is recommended. The course will consider theories and practices in the teaching and evaluation of second language writing (SLW). It will explore connections between first and second language writing, literacy, culture, and a variety of purposes. Students will learn how to identify writing needs, design tasks, and assess writing, and will form a philosophy of teaching SLW.

Capstone

  • ENG-E 398 Internship in English (3-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. A supervised internship in the use of English in a workplace. Apply during semester before desired internship.
  • ENG-E 450 Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) This senior capstone integrates students’ undergraduate study through writing and reading projects, faculty and student presentations, and creation of capstone portfolios. Students apply linguistic, literary, and rhetorical knowledge in culminating projects and learning portfolios. The course looks back at accomplishments and forward to postgraduation planning.
  • ENG-L 433 Conversations with Shakespeare (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary and intertextual study of Shakespeare’s work and its influence to the present day. Students will compare Shakespeare texts with latter-day novels, plays, poems, and films that allude to or incorporate some aspect of Shakespeare’s art.
  • ENG-L 440 Senior Seminar in English and American Literature (3 cr.)P: One 200-level and two 300-400-level literature courses. Detailed study of one or more major British and American writers or of one significant theme or form. Subject varies each semester. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 426 Writing for Popular and Professional Publication (3 cr.)Offers experienced writers near the end of their academic careers the opportunity to apply their skills to the public writing of the workplace. Students in this Honors course will integrate and apply academic writing skills gained from their previous academic work. They will compose documents appropriate for business and organizational purposes and explore the marketing process for freelance writing. Application of this “real-life” writing comes when ENG-W 426 students receive assignments from university units such as the University College and the School of Liberal Arts and fulfill them for inclusion in university publications.
  • ENG-W 496 Writing Tudor Training Seminar (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 and permission of instructor. Internship in University Writing Center. ENG-W 496 is an internship that prepares undergraduates to tutor in the University Writing Center.

English for Academic Purposes

  • ENG-G 15 Pronunciation Skills (1 cr.) This course focuses on American English pronunciation and stresses active learner involvement in small groups and self-tutorials. Practice in a contextualized format includes drills and multimedia listening and speaking activities. Classwork emphasizes stress and intonation patterns and vowel and consonant production. Individualized instruction focusing on specific needs is a component of the course.
  • ENG-G 101 Special Topics in EAP (3 cr.) Designed for EAP students, this course provides an introduction to English for Academic Purposes. The students will study the grammatical structures of the English language, EAP vocabulary, and their use in EAP speaking, listening, and reading.
  • ENG-G 109 Intermediate Aural/Oral Skills for EAP Students (3 cr.) C: G010 Intensive practice of basic speaking and pronunciation skills, as well as listening comprehension skills, to develop language proficiency required for study at the university level.
  • ENG-G 110 Intermediate EAP: Reading, Writing, and Grammar (3 cr.) C: ENG G109 This course introduces and reviews basic English grammatical structures; presents basic reading strategies and vocabulary development; and focuses on functional language use and study skills.
  • ENG-G 111 Academic English Reading: Perspectives on Culture/Society (3 cr.) In this course, non-native English speaking students will develop their academic reading, (cross)cultural understanding, and critical thinking skills through in depth reading. Students will read academic texts about current socio-cultural issues and explore their meaning in U.S. and global context. The students will learn how to critically analyze, interpret, and synthesize texts they read. They will demonstrate their reading and cultural analysis skills in discussions, oral presentations, and written responses and analyses of academic readings. Vocabulary building for college-level communication is integrated into the instruction.
  • ENG-G 112 Listening and Speaking Skills for Academic Purposes (3 cr.) This course focuses on developing speaking and listening skills that are essential to academic life, encouraging participation in group discussion, improvement in presentation strategies, and development of questioning and answering skills. It provides community involvement to help students better understand American culture and language use. Reading skills, vocabulary development, oral communication and presentation skills for the academic context are emphasized.
  • ENG-G 114 EAP Grammar (1 cr.) C: ENG G111 This course introduces and reviews English grammatical structures for EAP students. As a co-requisite of G111 (Academic English Reading), the course provides practice in and clarification of grammatical structures in academic texts at high-intermediate levels of EAP. Students from other EAP courses may be identified as needing additional EAP grammar support based on an instructor-led evaluation and can, therefore, be required to complete the course, as well. The class is conducted as a lab in which students will meet face to face with an instructor part of the time and then complete work on assigned grammar units outside of class. In class additional instruction and practice will be given, and students will complete assessments (quizzes and exams) focused on EAP grammar.
  • ENG-G 130 Principles of Composition EAP (3 cr.)Adapted for EAP students, ENG G130, which will be the EAP equivalent of ENG W130, is for students who have taken the EAP placement test and who subsequently need a semester of writing instruction before taking ENG G131, which is the credit-bearing equivalent of ENG W131. Like ENG W130, G130 will provide practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences and attention to sentence and paragraph structure.
  • ENG-G 131 Reading, Writing, and Inquiry(3 cr.)Adapted for EAP students, ENG G131, which will be the EAP equivalent of ENG W131 and satisfy the freshman writing requirement, teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students’ abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students’ own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.
  • ENG-G 410 Introduction to Legal English (1 cr.) An intensive, integrated academic language skills course addressing the linguistic demands of legal study in the U.S. Focuses on reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.
  • ENG-G 411 Legal English I (3 cr.) A language skills course focusing on (1) grammatical structures and reading strategies required to understand legal texts and material, and (2) listening skills needed for the law school classroom. Instruction in fundamental organizational patterns in writing is provided as needed.
  • ENG-G 412 Legal English II (3 cr.) An integrated language skills course that focuses primarily on the advanced study of academic legal writing, including editing skills.
  • ENG-G 434 TESOL Methods (3 cr.) The course examines recent theories of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students will get a chance to examine theories and methods and develop knowledge of linguistic resources available to new and/or practicing teachers.
  • ENG-G 441 Materials Prep for ESL Instruction (3 cr.)Students learn about materials preparation, syllabus design, and test preparation by applying a variety of theories to books and other ESL (English as a second language) teaching devices (e.g. tapes, videotapes, computer and software programs) in order to evaluate their usefulness and will learn to evaluate ESL materials for adequacy.
  • ENG-G 500 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.)An introduction to the English language: its nature, structure, and development.
  • ENG-G 513 Academic Writing Graduate Students (3 cr.) Designed to meet the academic writing needs of ESL graduate students from multiple disciplines, this course focuses on a variety of academic writing styles and disciplinary approaches to producing research papers and professional documents. Students practice paraphrasing, summarizing, critiquing discipline-related articles, as well as writing research proposals and a comprehensive research paper.
  • ENG-G 520 Communication Skills for Graduate Students and International Teaching Assistants (3 cr.) Designed for graduate students who are non-native speakers of English, this course provides instruction on oral communication skills, academic presentation skills and basic teaching strategies for the U.S. classroom. The primary focus is on oral language skills necessary to present academic materials in English to an American audience. Language skills, teaching skills, and knowledge about the U.S. classroom culture will be developed through discussions and classroom observations/simulations. Presentations, teaching practice and regular conferences will focus on individual needs.
  • ENG-G 541 Materials Preparation for ESL (3 cr.)

The Writing Program

  • ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, And Inquiry (3 cr.) ENG-W 131 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students’ abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students’ own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.
  • ENG-W 140 Elementary Composition/Honors (3 cr.) Offers an introductory writing course for advanced first-year writers. Like W131, W140 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students’ abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students’ own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.
  • ENG-W 230 Science Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140 (with a grade of C or higher). Instruction in preparing scientific reports, proposals, visuals, and research projects with instruction in CBE documentation and style.
  • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 (with a grade of C or higher). To develop research and writing skills requisite for most academic and professional activities. Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and writing techniques useful in preparing reviews, critical bibliographies, research and technical reports, proposals and papers.
  • ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140 (with a grade of C or higher). Offers instruction and practice in writing argumentative essays about complicated and controversial issues. The course focuses on strategies for identifying issues, assessing claims, locating evidence, deciding on a position, and writing papers with clear assertions and convincing arguments.