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Posted on March 24th, 2021 in Book, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

One of the earliest sources of humanity’s religious impulse was severe weather, which ancient peoples attributed to the wrath of storm gods. Enlightenment thinkers derided such beliefs as superstition and predicted they would pass away as humans became more scientifically and theologically sophisticated. But in America, scientific and theological hubris came face-to-face with the tornado, …

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Posted on March 22nd, 2021 in Article, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

“The Effects of Selective and Indiscriminate Repression on the 2013 Gezi Park Nonviolent Resistance Campaign” in the journal Sociological Perspectives.   Abstract We investigate the differential effects of selective and indiscriminate repression on the rate of protest actions during the nonviolent resistance campaign in Gezi Park, Turkey, in 2013. After deriving theoretical expectations about how …

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Posted on March 19th, 2021 in Book Chapter, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

Dr. Chris Lamb’s chapter in the new book, 42 Today: Jackie Robinson and His Legacy is on the differences in how the story of Jackie Robinson and the integration of baseball was covered by Black and white sportswriters.  The signing of Robinson was perhaps the most important story about civil rights in the years immediately …

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Posted on March 17th, 2021 in Article, Award, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

Dr. Rachel Wheeler, along with her co-authors, recently won the Lester Cappon award for best article published in the William and Mary Quarterly in 2019 and the Robert F. Heizer award for best article published in the field of ethnohistory in 2019. The award-winning article is titled, “Singing Box 331: Re-Sounding Eighteenth-Century Mohican Hymns from …

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Posted on March 15th, 2021 in Book, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

Why do so many conservative Christians continue to support Donald Trump despite his many overt moral failings? Why do many Americans advocate so vehemently for xenophobic policies, such as a border wall with Mexico? Why do many Americans seem so unwilling to acknowledge the injustices that ethnic and racial minorities experience in the United States? …

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Posted on March 9th, 2021 in Article, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

Dr. Jennifer Bute, along with doctoral student Clarissa Bowers and doctoral program graduate Daniel Park, recently published an article in Health Communication exploring how parents use communication to manage their children’s food allergies. The study is part of Dr. Bute’s ongoing program of research exploring communication about food allergies and stems from her service on …

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Posted on March 9th, 2021 in Community Engagement, Research by Aaron Dusso

Arab Indianapolis’ Mission: To document the long history and contributions of Arab Americans to Greater Indianapolis From the late 1800s until today, people of Arab descent have made Indianapolis their home. From establishing businesses to working in the fields of health care and education, they have contributed to the cultural vitality, economic growth, and social …

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Posted on March 6th, 2021 in Book, Publication, Research by Aaron Dusso

Peace Love Yoga: The Politics of Global Spirituality Overview Contextualizes spiritual commodities, entrepreneurs, and consumers in the context of neoliberal capitalism Offers a clear and innovative account of cultural appropriation in some of the largest spiritual industries, including yoga Provides the reader with a lens through which to understand the complex relationship between capitalism, neoliberalism, …

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Posted on March 6th, 2021 in Announcements, Research, Student/Alumni by Aaron Dusso

The Frederick Douglass Papers is a research unit of the School of Liberal Arts’ Institute for American Thought, dedicated to collecting, transcribing, editing, and publishing all of the speeches, correspondence, and writings of the iconic nineteenth-century African American. After fourteen years in the basement of the campus ES Building, the Douglass Papers relocated to the …

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Posted on March 6th, 2021 in Book, In-Progress, Research by Aaron Dusso

by Elizabeth Nelson and Emily Beckman Widely remembered as sites of abuse, isolation, and neglect, many state-run psychiatric hospitals and homes for the disabled were shuttered across the United States in the late 20th century. Indiana’s Central State Hospital (1848-1994) came to a particularly tragic end, after a series of preventable patient deaths in the …

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