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WLAC Undergraduate

German

The IUPUI Program in German trains students to achieve communicative and cultural competence in German, i.e. to speak and write about everyday topics as well as more complex subjects.  A step-by-step progression of language courses enables students to achieve these goals.

Students will acquire a solid knowledge of contemporary life in the German-speaking countries by examining institutions, customs, and mentalities in cross-cultural contexts.  They will also develop a critical understanding of the historical and cultural movements and personalities that have shaped contemporary German culture.  In addition, students in the program have the option to study in Germany or Austria and/or to gain practical experience by working overseas.

Courses in German broaden students’ cultural horizons by providing access to a key region of central Europe.  They prepare students for a variety of careers in international business, communication, translation, travel and hospitality, education, engineering, technology and business.  Finally, combining the study of another discipline with specialization in German enables students to pursue interdisciplinary graduate studies.

The Program in German offers:

  * A Major in German
  * A Teaching Major in German toward Teacher Certification through the Transition to Teaching Program with the IU School of Education at IUPUI
  * A Minor in German
  * A Dual Degree option with the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI

WLAC Undergraduate

Course Descriptions

German (subject code: GER)

Undergraduate Courses

G095-G096 German for Reading Proficiency (3-3 cr.) These courses stress mastery of passive vocabulary and recognition of grammatical forms needed for reading skills. Designed for students in science, technology, the professional schools, and for those desiring sufficient proficiency in reading and translating German to enable them to work with German materials in their fields. These courses do not fulfill the foreign language requirement of the School of Liberal Arts .

G131-G132 Beginning German I-II (4-4 cr.) Intensive introduction to present-day German and selected aspects of German life. Intensive drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.

G203 Intermediate German I (3 cr.) P: G132, or equivalent or placement by testing. Intensive review of grammar. Further development of oral and written use of the language. Selections from contemporary German readings and media.

G204 Intermediate German II (3 cr.) P: G203 or equivalent or placement by testing. Review of grammar. Readings of modern German with stress on discussion in German. Writing of descriptive and expository prose.

G265 German Culture in English Translation (3 cr.) A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, as well as of contemporary civilization, with an emphasis on individual aspects of culture traced through several epochs.

G303 Deutsch: Mittelstufe I (3 cr.) P: G230 or equivalent or placement by testing. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in G117 through G230. Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignments of literary and nonliterary texts. Conducted in German.

G304 Deutsch: Mittelstufe II (3 cr.) P: G300 or equivalent. Advanced oral and written communication. Study of selected advanced grammatical topics. Reading of primarily nonliterary texts. Conducted in German.

G331 Business German I (3 cr.) P: third-year language proficiency or consent of instructor. Emphasis on acquisition and use of business vocabulary, idiom, and style. Translating, reading, and writing skills are developed using constructions common to business German, as well as current materials (reports, journals) in the field.

G333 German Translation Practice (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Introduction to the theory and practice of translation. Discussion of techniques and stylistic approaches. Emphasis on German/English translation using a variety of texts, including technical texts, business communication, and texts on current topics.

G340 German Language and Society, Past and Present. (3 cr.) P: G230 or equivalent. Further development of composition, conversation, and diction; review of grammar.

G355 Theater Spielen (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. This combined reading, discussion, pronunciation, and performance course provides an applied introduction to contemporary German theater and drama, along with intensive practice of oral language skills.

G365 Deutsche Kultur Heute (3 cr.) P: third year proficiency or consent of instructor. A critical investigation of contemporary culture in the German-speaking countries, including institutions and major personalities, customs, traditions, changing mentalities, and lifestyles as they compare with contemporary U.S. culture. Taught in German.

G370 German Cinema (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production. Offered in English concurrently with G371. No credit given towards German major.

G371 Der deutsche Film (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or equivalent. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production.

G381 German Literature to 1750 in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature in the medieval, Reformation, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Offered in English.

G382 Classicism and Romanticism in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature, 1750-1830, to include the periods of the Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, and Romanticism; representative writers such as Schiller, Goethe, Kleist, and the Grimm brothers. Offered in English.

G383 Nineteenth-Century German Literature in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Works and writers of German literature, 1830-1900. Analysis of such concepts as realism, naturalism, and neoromanticism, their theories and styles; exemplary writers such as Buechner, Heine, Nietzsche, Hauptmann, and others. Offered in English.

G384 Twentieth-Century German Literature in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, with emphasis on Rilke, Thomas Mann, Kafka, and Brecht. Offered in English.

G391 German Colloquium in English Translation II (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. May be taken as an elective by other students. Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre in German literature, or other aspect of German culture. No credit given toward German major.

G401 Deutsche Kultur in Amerika (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Advanced undergraduate course. Its purposes are to provide an overview of the cultural heritage of German-Americans and to assist students in researching German heritage with a view toward developing research skills with original materials. The course is in a seminar format with students actively participating in discussions and presentations. Taught in German.

G407 Knights, God, and the Devil (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the development of early German cultural life by reading and analyzing texts of the periods covered. Lecture materials cover historical and cultural background. Period texts are placed in contexts of other cultural phenomena, including art and music. As much reference as possible is made to the European context of the emerging German literacy language. Taught in German.

G408 Love, Nature, and the Age of Romanticism (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Introduction to the cultural capital of courtly Germany, Weimar, and its relationship to German Romanticism, including readings and discussions of works by Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Tieck, and the Grimm brothers. Literary examples are accompanied by pictorial, filmic, and musical illustrations. Taught in German.

G409 German Myths, Fairy Tales, and Social Transformation
P: 3rd year proficiency or consent of instructor.  Survey of literary representation of 19th century German culture at a time of change from rural to urban life. Text selection includes a variety of shorter forms, i.e. fairy tales, short stories, novella, satire, and drama. Taught in German.

G410 20. Jahrhundert: Kultur und Literatur (3cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural and intellectual life of the German-speaking countries of the twentieth century, through the reading of exemplary literary works. Discussion of literary movements from the turn of the century until the present. Texts are analyzed within the context of other cultural phenomena, including film and music. Conducted in German.

G423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: G333 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in German-English translation providing intensive translation practice in many text categories: commercial and economic translations, scientific, technical, political, and legal texts. Applied work combined with study of theory and methodology of translation, comparative structural and stylistical analysis and evaluation of sample translations. Use of computer-assisted translation management.

G431 Advanced Business German (3 cr.) P: fourth-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Focus is on the contemporary business idiom and current economic issues facing Germany . Active practice of specialized business language, both for oral and written communication.

G445 Oberstufe: Grammatik (3 cr.) P: fourth-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Survey and practice of complex grammatical structures; systematic expansion of vocabulary. Discussion and writing based on current materials, such as newspapers, films, and radio programs.

G465 Oberstufe: Kommunikation (3 cr.) P: fourth-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Systematic development of writing and speaking skills, proceeding from exercises to specific forms, such as Brief, Aufsatz, Referat, Vortrag. Focus on usage and style.

G490 Das deutsche Kolloquium (3 cr.) P:fourth-year German language proficiency or consent of instructor. Concentration on a specific topic, genre, or author in German literature, film, or other aspect of culture.

G491-G492 Elementary German for Graduate Students I-II These courses are taught concurrently with G095-G096 and prepare students for the German reading proficiency exam.

G493 Internship in German (1-6 cr.) P: consent of program coordinator.

G498 Individual Studies in German (1-6 cr.) P: consent of program director.

Graduate Courses

G507 Foreign Language Institute (1-6 cr.) Intensive interdepartmental course involving language laboratory and other audiovisual equipment and techniques, lecture, assignments in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), and discussions of classroom use of applied linguistics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G528 Comparative Stylistics and Translation (3 cr.) This is an introductory course to the practice and evaluation of translation. Students will get hands-on experience with many different text types from a variety of areas and professions and develop skills to translate them into both English and German. At the same time, students will have the opportunity to discuss some of the theoretical and professional issues involved in translation as a profession.

G529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.

G530 Specialized Translation II (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and resources for the translation of technical, scientific, and medical documents, as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.

G551 The Structure of German (3 cr.) The course provides students with a critical examination to the core disciplines of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, syntax, and morphology and semantics. While the approach is generally a cross-linguistic one, stressing parallels between English and German, for example, special emphasis is placed on examples from German. 

G563 German Culture Studies I (3 cr.) The formation of cultural traditions in the German-speaking countries prior to the twentieth century.

G564 German Culture Studies II (3 cr.) Culture of the German-speaking countries in the twentieth century.

V605 Selected Topics in German Studies 
(2-4 cr.; 12 cr. max.)

Major and Minor Requirements

The Major in German

In addition to the area distribution requirements for the School of Liberal Arts, the major in German requires the following:

The German Major requires a minimum of 29 credit hours above the 100 level, including at least one capstone language course (i.e. G401, G423, G431, G445, G465), one contemporary culture course (G365), at least one 400-level historical culture and literature course (i.e. G407, G408, G409, G410), and a student portfolio (G498). Other courses may be selected on the basis of level of placement by test or course work, and/or focus of interest. They include all 200-, 300-, and 400-level courses, except courses taugh in English.

The Minor in German

The minor in German is for students whose interest is in the German language as a tool of communication. Its emphasis is on competence in the skills of reading, writing, and understanding spoken German, as well as on conversational proficiency in German.

The minor can be beneficial to students in the natural and social sciences, business, engineering and technology, other languages, and interdisciplinary subjects. Requirements for the minor consist of 15 credit hours to include G203 and G204, plus a minimum of 9 credit hours from courses at the 300-level.  For more information, please download and complete the Application for a Minor in German.

Dual Degree in German and Engineering

Students majoring in biomedical, mechanical, electrical, motorsports or computer engineering can also earn an applied German major. The dual degree program takes five years to complete and includes a one-semester internship in Germany during the fourth year of study. Students may formally enter into the program after successful completion of the freshman engineering program. For further information contact the German Program Director or the freshman Engineering Director.

International Engineering at IUPUI

Transition to Teaching Program: T2T

The Transition-to-Teaching Program is a popular option for students who already hold a Bachelor degree in German. Students may be admitted after successfully completing the Praxis I Exam and fulfilling other requirements. Refer to the School of Education Graduate Program Bulletin for further information or contact the T2T Program Advisor, Sharice Breland sbreland@iupui.edu

Honors Program

In order to provide recognition to outstanding students in German, the department offers and Honors Program as well as H-Option courses.

WLAC Undergraduate

Study Abroad

Programs abroad are open to students majoring in all academic disciplines and are not restricted to language majors. Study abroad options include:

Summer program in Heilbronn, Germany (2 weeks) 
• Summer internship in Mannheim, Germany (2 months)
• Summer program in Graz, Austria, with I.U. Overseas Study (6 weeks)
• Semester and academic year programs in Freiburg, Germany, with I.U. Overseas Study 
• Short term program "Go Green Germany", through the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology (no language prerequisite, credits in OLS)

For all programs visit the website of the IUPUI Study Abroad Office, http://abroad.iupui.edu. Scholarships and Financial Aid apply to all programs.

WLAC Undergraduate

Additional Resource Links

Max Kade German-American Center

The Center promotes the study of the German heritage in Indiana through research, community outreach and special programs. It also awards scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students studying German or the German heritage.

Max Kade German-American Center

Indianapolis German School

The German School offers German language classes for children ages 3-12 on Saturday mornings. For information contact: Prof. Grossmann: cgrossma@iupui.edu

Links to the German-Speaking World