WLAC Undergraduate

Course Descriptions

German (subject code: GER)

Major in German

In addition to the area distribution requirements for the School of Liberal Arts , the major in German requires the following:

The German Major requires a minimum of 29 credit hours above the 100 level, including at least one advanced language course (i.e. G401, G423, G431, G445, G465), one contemporary culture course (G365), at least one 400-level historical culture and literature course (i.e. G407, G408, G409, G410) and a capstone portfolio (G498). Other courses may also be selected on the basis of level of placement by test or course work, and/or focus of interest. They include all 200-, 300-, and 400-level courses, except courses taught in English.

Major Course Requirements

1. A minimum of one 400-level language course from the following list:

G401 Deutsche Kultur in Amerika (3 cr.)  

G423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.)

G431 Advanced Business German (3 cr.)

G445 Oberstufe: Grammatik (3 cr.)

G 465: The Structure of German (3 cr.)

2. One contemporary culture course:

G365 Deutsche Kultur Heute (3 cr.)

3. A minimum of one 400-level historical culture and literature course from the following list:

G407 Knights, God, and the Devil (3 cr.)

G408 Love, Nature, and the Age of Romanticism (3 cr.)

G409 German Myths, Fairy Tales, and Social Transformation (3 cr.)

G410 20. Jahrhundert: Kultur und Literatur (3 cr.)

4. Capstone portfolio:

G498 Individual Studies in German (1 cr.)

To help assess and showcase academic progress in German, as well as critical writing skills, graduating majors will assemble and present a portfolio including a reflective essay and representative examples of academic and co-curricular work.

International Study or Work Internship Option

G493 Internship in German (1-6 cr.)

G498 Individual Studies in German (1-5 cr.)
1-5 credit hours toward the major in German may be earned through individual study or international work internship abroad or locally. There is a 3-credit limit for one individual study or work project.

Minor in German

The minor in German language skills is for students who are interested in the German language as a tool of communication. Its emphasis is on competence in the skills of reading, writing, and understanding spoken German, as well as on conversational proficiency in German.

Requirements consist of 15 credit hours, to include G203 and G204 or G299, plus a minimum of 9 credit hours from courses at the 300 or 400 level taught in German.

German Course Rotation

First- and Second-Year German courses are currently offered as follows:

  • First-Year German: each Fall and Spring, as well as Summer
  • Second-Year German: each Fall and Spring, not in Summer

All 300- and 400-level courses are offered on a rotation basis, generally as follows:

  • Three upper-level courses per semester
  • One literature course per year
  • One 400-level language capstone course per year
  • G365: every other Spring
  • G493 & G498: each semester, including Summer

Dual Degree in Engineering and German

Students majoring in mechanical, electrical, motorsports or computer engineering can also earn an applied German major. The dual degree program takes five years to complete and includes a one-semester internship in Germany during the fourth year of study. Students may formally enter into the program after successful completion of the freshmen engineering curriculum. For further information contact the German Program Director and refer to the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology section of this bulletin.

Teacher Certification for Secondary School with a Major in German

The teaching major for a middle school/high school teaching license requires the completion of at least 36 credit hours, 30 credit hours at the 300 and 400 level. For a detailed description of all requirements, see the German Program Director and refer to the School of Education Undergraduate Program Bulletin .

Secondary School with a Minor in German

The teaching minor requires the completion of at least 24 credit hours, of which 18 credit hours must be in courses at the 300 and 400 level. For a detailed description of all requirements, see the German Program Director and refer to the School of Education Undergraduate Program Bulletin .

Honors Program

Honors in German can be achieved either through an honors degree or through the H-Option in individual courses. The German Program Director must be contacted before enrolling in honors work.

Honors Degree

Requirement   A cumulative grade point average of 3.3, and a 3.5 grade point average in German courses. A total of 24 credit hours of course work must be earned with honors. At least 18 credit hours (out of the total 24) must be earned in German courses above the G119 or G132 level, and 6 credit hours must be in electives.

H-Option

Honors credit through the H-Option may be earned in (a) upper-division language courses (i.e., above G132), as well as (b) upper-division literature, film, culture, and topics courses offered for German credit.

Foreign Study

Any form of foreign study is highly recommended, and the department gives credit for such study wherever possible. Outstanding students with a substantial command of German, a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a B average in German coursesmay apply for the Overseas Study academic year program in Freiburg , Germany , during their junior year. Up to 30 IU credit hours may be earned through the program. Semester programs are also available in Freiburg . A summer program is offered in Graz , Austria , for students who have completed course work through G204. In addition, students who completed first-year German apply for the two-week summer program in Heilbronn, Germany, which includes a service learning component. Contact the German Program Director or International Affairs.

Internship in Baden-Württemberg

Students in the Schools of Liberal Arts; Science, Engineering, and Technology; and Business may apply for a two-month summer internship with a German firm in southwestern Germany . Advanced standing, a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, and German language skills are required. Each area of the exchange has a specific language requirement. 3 credits may be earned.

Other Activities

German Club   The department sponsors a German Club, open to all interested students. Various topics are discussed and events of cultural interest are presented during the academic year.

Max Kade German-American Center

In cooperation with several community organizations, the department operates a center for German-related activities in the Deutsche Haus-Athenaeum. The Center also offers two awards annually for students to study German overseas as well as two fellowships for graduate students involved in German-American Studies. The Center also maintains an active publishing program.

Undergraduate Courses

G095-G096 German for Reading Proficiency (3-3 cr.) These courses stress mastery of passive vocabulary and recognition of grammatical forms needed for reading skills. Designed for students in science, technology, the professional schools, and for those desiring sufficient proficiency in reading and translating German to enable them to work with German materials in their fields. These courses do not fulfill the foreign language requirement of the School of Liberal Arts .

G131-G132 Beginning German I-II (4-4 cr.) Intensive introduction to present-day German and selected aspects of German life. Intensive drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.

G134-G135 Introductory German for Business I-II (3-3 cr.) Introductory courses for students and professionals in business and engineering, who need basic communicative skills for the workplace. In addition to the four basic language skills, intercultural communication and basic technical, business, and scientific vocabulary are introduced.

G203 Intermediate German I (3 cr.) P: G132, or equivalent or placement by testing. Intensive review of grammar. Further development of oral and written use of the language. Selections from contemporary German readings and media.

G204 Intermediate German II (3 cr.) P: G203 or equivalent or placement by testing. Review of grammar. Readings of modern German with stress on discussion in German. Writing of descriptive and expository prose.

G265 German Culture in English Translation (3 cr.) A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, as well as of contemporary civilization, with an emphasis on individual aspects of culture traced through several epochs.

G299 German for Advanced Credit (3 or 6 cr.) Nonnative speakers of German may receive a maximum of 6 hours of advanced credit with the grade of "S" upon completion of G300 or higher with a grade of C or higher. Native speakers of German may receive a maximum of 6 advanced credits upon completion of two German courses at the 300-400 level with the grade of C or higher. A student who skips a sequential course (e.g. G225 or G230) may receive 3 advanced credits upon successful completion of a higher-level course.

G303 Deutsch: Mittelstufe I (3 cr.) P: G230 or equivalent or placement by testing. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in G117 through G230. Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignments of literary and nonliterary texts. Conducted in German.

G304 Deutsch: Mittelstufe II (3 cr.) P: G300 or equivalent. Advanced oral and written communication. Study of selected advanced grammatical topics. Reading of primarily nonliterary texts. Conducted in German.

G331 Business German I (3 cr.) P: third-year language proficiency or consent of instructor. Emphasis on acquisition and use of business vocabulary, idiom, and style. Translating, reading, and writing skills are developed using constructions common to business German, as well as current materials (reports, journals) in the field.

G333 German Translation Practice (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Introduction to the theory and practice of translation. Discussion of techniques and stylistic approaches. Emphasis on German/English translation using a variety of texts, including technical texts, business communication, and texts on current topics.

G340 German Language and Society, Past and Present. (3 cr.) P: G230 or equivalent. Further development of composition, conversation, and diction; review of grammar.

G355 Theater Spielen (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. This combined reading, discussion, pronunciation, and performance course provides an applied introduction to contemporary German theater and drama, along with intensive practice of oral language skills.

G365 Deutsche Kultur Heute (3 cr.) P: third year proficiency or consent of instructor. A critical investigation of contemporary culture in the German-speaking countries, including institutions and major personalities, customs, traditions, changing mentalities, and lifestyles as they compare with contemporary U.S. culture. Taught in German.

G370 German Cinema (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production. Offered in English concurrently with G371. No credit given towards German major.

G371 Der deutsche Film (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or equivalent. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production.

G381 German Literature to 1750 in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature in the medieval, Reformation, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Offered in English.

G382 Classicism and Romanticism in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature, 1750-1830, to include the periods of the Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, and Romanticism; representative writers such as Schiller, Goethe, Kleist, and the Grimm brothers. Offered in English.

G383 Nineteenth-Century German Literature in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Works and writers of German literature, 1830-1900. Analysis of such concepts as realism, naturalism, and neoromanticism, their theories and styles; exemplary writers such as Buechner, Heine, Nietzsche, Hauptmann, and others. Offered in English.

G384 Twentieth-Century German Literature in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, with emphasis on Rilke, Thomas Mann, Kafka, and Brecht. Offered in English.

G391 German Colloquium in English Translation II (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. May be taken as an elective by other students. Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre in German literature, or other aspect of German culture. No credit given toward German major.

G401 Deutsche Kultur in Amerika (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Advanced undergraduate course. Its purposes are to provide an overview of the cultural heritage of German-Americans and to assist students in researching German heritage with a view toward developing research skills with original materials. The course is in a seminar format with students actively participating in discussions and presentations. Taught in German.

G407 Knights, God, and the Devil (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the development of early German cultural life by reading and analyzing texts of the periods covered. Lecture materials cover historical and cultural background. Period texts are placed in contexts of other cultural phenomena, including art and music. As much reference as possible is made to the European context of the emerging German literacy language. Taught in German.

G408 Love, Nature, and the Age of Romanticism (3 cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Introduction to the cultural capital of courtly Germany, Weimar, and its relationship to German Romanticism, including readings and discussions of works by Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Tieck, and the Grimm brothers. Literary examples are accompanied by pictorial, filmic, and musical illustrations. Taught in German.

G409 German Myths, Fairy Tales, and Social Transformation
P: 3rd year proficiency or consent of instructor.  Survey of literary representation of 19th century German culture at a time of change from rural to urban life. Text selection includes a variety of shorter forms, i.e. fairy tales, short stories, novella, satire, and drama. Taught in German.

G410 20. Jahrhundert: Kultur und Literatur (3cr.) P: third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural and intellectual life of the German-speaking countries of the twentieth century, through the reading of exemplary literary works. Discussion of literary movements from the turn of the century until the present. Texts are analyzed within the context of other cultural phenomena, including film and music. Conducted in German.

G423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: G333 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in German-English translation providing intensive translation practice in many text categories: commercial and economic translations, scientific, technical, political, and legal texts. Applied work combined with study of theory and methodology of translation, comparative structural and stylistical analysis and evaluation of sample translations. Use of computer-assisted translation management.

G431 Advanced Business German (3 cr.) P: fourth-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Focus is on the contemporary business idiom and current economic issues facing Germany . Active practice of specialized business language, both for oral and written communication.

G445 Oberstufe: Grammatik (3 cr.) P: fourth-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Survey and practice of complex grammatical structures; systematic expansion of vocabulary. Discussion and writing based on current materials, such as newspapers, films, and radio programs.

G465 Oberstufe: Kommunikation (3 cr.) P: fourth-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Systematic development of writing and speaking skills, proceeding from exercises to specific forms, such as Brief, Aufsatz, Referat, Vortrag. Focus on usage and style.

G490 Das deutsche Kolloquium (3 cr.) P:fourth-year German language proficiency or consent of instructor. Concentration on a specific topic, genre, or author in German literature, film, or other aspect of culture.

G491-G492 Elementary German for Graduate Students I-II These courses are taught concurrently with G095-G096 and prepare students for the German reading proficiency exam.

G493 Internship in German (1-6 cr.) P: consent of program coordinator.

G498 Individual Studies in German (1-6 cr.) P: consent of program director.

Graduate Courses

G507 Foreign Language Institute (1-6 cr.) Intensive interdepartmental course involving language laboratory and other audiovisual equipment and techniques, lecture, assignments in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), and discussions of classroom use of applied linguistics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G563 German Culture Studies I (3 cr.) The formation of cultural traditions in the German-speaking countries prior to the twentieth century.

G564 German Culture Studies II (3 cr.) Culture of the German-speaking countries in the twentieth century.

V605 Selected Topics in German Studies
(2-4 cr.; 12 cr. max.)