Individualized Major Program

Reading at the Table: Talking Politics? What You Need to Know Before Opening Your Mouth

Join Professor Sheila Suess Kennedy on September 17, 2014, for lunch and a discussion of Talking Politics: What You Need to Know Before Opening Your Mouth. Honest, objective, and informed political debates are all too rare in today's polarized and partisan climate. Public policy is increasingly driven by ideology while political spin, distortions, and even demonizing opponents by disseminating outright lies are routine practice from Washington to the local city council. Super-heated and hyper-partisan rhetoric, increasingly homogeneous political and ideological communities, and the public's spotty knowledge about our political system all undermine informed and considered responses to policy debates. Purchase of a buffet lunch for $13 (desserts and soft drinks not included) is required to attend this event. Please register in advance. Presented by the Office of Academic Affairs.

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Paralegal Panel

Presented by The Indiana Paralegal Association and the IUPUI Department of Political Science Hear from Indiana paralegals and attorneys about the profession Take part in a Question and Answer session with paralegals and attorneys who use paralegals in practice Network with area paralegals and attorneys

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Sixteenth Annual Meeting for The Midwest Pragmatist Study Group

THE MIDWEST PRAGMATIST STUDY GROUP of The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy Sixteenth Annual Meeting Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Indianapolis, Indiana USA 27-28 September 2014 Saturday 1:00PM to 5:45PM Sunday: 9:30AM to 12:15PM All sessions meet in Cavanaugh Hall, Room 508 425 University Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46202 No fee, no registration, open to the public The Midwest Pragmatist Study Group meets annually to promote interaction among scholars and students interested in Classic American Philosophy, contemporary work it has inspired, or pragmatism broadly conceived. Sponsored by the Institute for American Thought, the Santayana Edition, the Department of Philosophy, and the American Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Contact Martin Coleman martcole@iupui.edu, tel. 317-278-8572 More information, including the program, is available here: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/mpsg/

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Sixteenth Annual Meeting for The Midwest Pragmatist Study Group

THE MIDWEST PRAGMATIST STUDY GROUP of The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy Sixteenth Annual Meeting Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Indianapolis, Indiana USA 27-28 September 2014 Saturday 1:00PM to 5:45PM Sunday: 9:30AM to 12:15PM All sessions meet in Cavanaugh Hall, Room 508 425 University Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46202 No fee, no registration, open to the public The Midwest Pragmatist Study Group meets annually to promote interaction among scholars and students interested in Classic American Philosophy, contemporary work it has inspired, or pragmatism broadly conceived. Sponsored by the Institute for American Thought, the Santayana Edition, the Department of Philosophy, and the American Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Contact Martin Coleman martcole@iupui.edu, tel. 317-278-8572 More information, including the program, is available here: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/mpsg/

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2014 Indiana Nonprofit Summit

We invite you to participate in the 2014 Indiana Nonprofit Summit. The conference will be heldOct. 1-2 at the IUPUI Campus Centerand will bring together leaders from across the state representing the nonprofit sector, volunteer coordinators, and innovative thinkers to share best practices and celebrate success stories, build professional and organizational skills, and develop collaborative partnerships and strategies to address some of the most pressing problems facing our communities. Program overview: HUMAN NEEDS SUMMIT (Oct. 1, 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.)
 The only event of its type in Indiana each year, the Human Needs Summit brings practitioners, researchers and thought leaders together in a series of collaborative working sessions to discuss trends, share best practices and brainstorm solutions related to the state’s most pressing areas of need in service sectors like Health, Education, Hunger, and Housing. SKILL-BUILDING WORKSHOPS (Oct. 2, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) An entire day of Skill-Building Workshops will provide vital opportunities for professional and organizational development along six tracks: Funding/Finance, Marketing/Communications, Collaboration, Volunteerism, Strategic Planning, and Governance. Register today! Visithttp://indiananonprofitsummit.orgfor more information.

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2014 Indiana Nonprofit Summit

We invite you to participate in the 2014 Indiana Nonprofit Summit. The conference will be heldOct. 1-2 at the IUPUI Campus Centerand will bring together leaders from across the state representing the nonprofit sector, volunteer coordinators, and innovative thinkers to share best practices and celebrate success stories, build professional and organizational skills, and develop collaborative partnerships and strategies to address some of the most pressing problems facing our communities. Program overview: HUMAN NEEDS SUMMIT (Oct. 1, 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.)
 The only event of its type in Indiana each year, the Human Needs Summit brings practitioners, researchers and thought leaders together in a series of collaborative working sessions to discuss trends, share best practices and brainstorm solutions related to the state’s most pressing areas of need in service sectors like Health, Education, Hunger, and Housing. SKILL-BUILDING WORKSHOPS (Oct. 2, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) An entire day of Skill-Building Workshops will provide vital opportunities for professional and organizational development along six tracks: Funding/Finance, Marketing/Communications, Collaboration, Volunteerism, Strategic Planning, and Governance. Register today! Visithttp://indiananonprofitsummit.orgfor more information.

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Research at the Frontiers: A Geographic Journey-Professor Rudy Banerjee

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Professor Rudy Banerjee-Geography Research at the Frontiers: A Geographic Journey Journey through Berkeley and Silicon Valley to explore geographic information science in the halls of academe and in startup culture, which blends cutting edge research with real world pragmatics. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Rudy Banerjee talk in the subject line.

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Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition

"Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition." Thursday, October 9, 2014: IUPUI Hine Hall A public event to observe and assess the publication of the first scholarly edition of The Heroic Slave, the only significant work of fiction by the 19th century’s best-known African American: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). A runaway slave, Douglass rose to become an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist, and diplomat. Schedule: 11:00AM-12:00PM Registration 12:00PM-1:00PM Opening Luncheon Welcoming Remarks Dr. Karen Dace, Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Dr. Marianne Wokeck, Director of the Institute of American Thought Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun, Chair of Africana Studies Introductory Remarks by Symposium Organizer Professor John R. Kaufman-McKivigan, Editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers, IUPUI 1:15PM-3:00PM Session 1: The Heroic Slave in History Moderator: V.P. Franklin, Editor of the Journal of African American History "The Nonfiction Madison Washington: How Does He Compare to the Character in Frederick Douglass's "Heroic Slave" and Similar Civil-War-Era Fiction?" Stanley Harrold, Professor of History, South Carolina State University "Autographs for Freedom: The Heroic Slave’s Abolitionist Audience" John R. Kaufman-McKivigan, Mary O’Brien Gibson Professor of History, IUPUI and Alex Smith, Research Assistant, Frederick Douglass Papers "Insurrection as Righteous Rebellion in The Heroic Slave and Beyond" L. Diane Barnes, Professor of History, Youngstown State University 3:30PM-4:45PM Session 2: The Heroic Slave in Literature Moderator: Robert S. Levine, Professor of English, University of Maryland "Self-reflexivity, Aesthetic Experimentation, and Transforming andlsquo;Chattel Records’ into andlsquo;Works of Art’ in The Heroic Slave" Celeste-Marie Bernier, University of Nottingham/ King's College London "A Mutinous Fiction: Frederick Douglass’s andlsquo;The Heroic Slave.’" Deborah McDowell, Director, Carter G. Woodson Institute and Alice Griffin Professor of Literary Studies, University of Virginia "A Truth Stranger than Fiction: Frederick Douglass’s Aesthetics and the Early African American Novel" Ivy Wilson, Associate Professor of English and Director of American Studies, Northwestern University 5:00-5:45PM Plenary Session "Madison Washington, Frederick Douglass, and the African American Revolutionary Tradition." John W. Stauffer, Harvard University Hosted by the Frederick Douglass Papers, Institute for American Thought, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Africana Studies Program, Department of History, Department of English, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and Indiana Humanities. Free and open to the public. Registration is required. For information or to register: douglass@iupui.edu

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Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition - Concluding Keynote Address

6:00PM andndash; 8:30 PM Concluding Keynote Address: Public Reception preceding the address. Welcoming Remarks by Symposium Organizer Professor John R. Kaufman- McKivigan Introduction of Keynoter by Dean William Blomquist, IU School of Liberal Arts, Indianapolis "Heroic Slaves: Madison Washington and My Bondage and My Freedom." Robert S. Levine, Professor of English, University of Maryland Robert S. Levine is Distinguished University Professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Conspiracy and Romance (1989), Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Politics of Representative Identity (1997), and Dislocating Race and Nation (2008). He is also the General Editor of The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Hosted by the Frederick Douglass Papers, Institute for American Thought, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Africana Studies Program, Department of History, Department of English, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and Indiana Humanities. Free and open to the public. Registration is required. For information or to register: douglass@iupui.edu

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Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition

Friday, October 10, 2014, The Jewel Center A public event to observe and assess the publication of the first scholarly edition of The Heroic Slave, the only significant work of fiction by the 19th century’s best-known African American: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). A runaway slave, Douglass rose to become an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist, and diplomat. This event is held in conjunction with the Second Annual Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Public Lecture and Workshop. Schedule: 8:00-9:00AM Continental Breakfast 9:15AM-9:45AM Welcome Welcoming Remarks Dr. Karen Dace, Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, IUPUI Bessie House-Soremekun, Chair of Africana Studies program, IUPUI John Kaufmann-McKivigan, Editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers, IUPUI 10:00AM-11:00AM Ist Session: "Slave Rebels throughout American History" Panelists: L. Diane Barnes, Professor of History, Youngstown State University; John R. Kaufmann-McKivigan, Professor of History, IUPUI; and Stanley Harrold, Professor of History, South Carolina State University 11:15AM-12:15PM 2nd Session: "The African American Literature of Slavery" Panelists: Jane Schultz, Professor of English, IUPUI; Robert S. Levine, Professor of English, University of Maryland; Celeste-Marie Bernier, University of Nottingham/ King's College London 12:30PM-2:30PM Luncheon and Awards Presentations "The Power to Define: History, Scholarship, and Social Change." Luncheon Address by V.P. Franklin, Editor of the Journal of African American History Awards Presentation by Bessie House-Soremekun, Chair of Africana Studies Program Hosted by the Frederick Douglass Papers, Institute for American Thought, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Africana Studies Program, Department of History, Department of English, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and Indiana Humanities. Free and open to the public. Registration is required. For information or to register: douglass@iupui.edu

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The Future History of the Book: Time, Attention, Convention - John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities

The Future History of the Book: Time, Attention, Convention Kathleen Fitzpatrick Director of Scholarly Communication Modern Language Association Anxieties abound regarding the ostensible obsolescence of the book. Exploring whether the book is in fact becoming obsolete — and what it might mean if it were — requires thinking distinctly about the specific material form of the book (the codex) and about the content that it has long carried. If the form were to change — becoming digital, for instance — would our interactions with the content still make the book (if not exactly as we have known it) a viable vector for the cultural interactions the codex has supported? Would it be possible for us to find the powerful identification with the electronic book that we long have had with the codex book? And what might need to happen in order to effect such a transfer of our affections? 5:00  Reception 6:00  Lecture RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu Presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts

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Telecollaborative Foreign Language Education-Professor Julie Belz

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Professor Julie Belz-English Telecollaborative Foreign Language Education How do people learn second (and third and fourth) languages, and what is learned in the process? Examine the impact of Internet-mediated, class-to-class learning partnerships on the acquisition of linguistic, pragmatic, and intercultural competence, i.e. the ability to see the self through the eyes of the other. RSVP:libarsvp@iupui.eduwithJulie Belz talkin the subject line.

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Running Bravely Through Life with Billy Mills (Oglala Lakota)

Billy Mills won the gold medal in the 10,000 meter event in the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. He looked inside himself and to his Native American values to over- come obstacles, discover his passion and reach for his dreams. Call 317.275.1350 to schedule your visit. Program Fee: $4 No charge for IPS student groups.

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Why Should Non-Scientists Care About Science?

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Victoria Rogers, Philosophy Why Should Non-Scientists Care About Science? What role can non-science disciplines play in fostering scientific literacy for all students? How is scientific literacy related to critical thinking? Examine these questions and potential pedagogical approaches to the crucial problem of misconceptions about science. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Victoria Rogers talk in the subject line.

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Lessons from Teaching "Business German" Online-Professor Claudia Grossman

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Professor Claudia Grossman, World Languages and Culture Lessons from Teaching Business German Online IUPUI's first fully-online German course, Business German, was redesigned to incorporate new technologies, foster self directed learning, and support collaboration with native speakers. The outcomes offered many rewards, and a few surprises. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Claudia Grossman talk in the subject line.

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From “Keystone Mabel” to “Goldwyn Girl”: Mabel Normand-Professor Kristine Karnick

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Professor Kristine Karnick, Communication Studies From "Keystone Mabel" to "Goldwyn Girl": Mabel Normand Once judged Hollywood's most popular female comedian, Mabel Normand's popularity was in decline a mere seven years into her career. Examine the changing social climate that provided the beginning of the end to the star's film career. RSVP:libarsvp@iupui.eduwithKristine Karnick talkin the subject line.

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Life, Death, and All That Jazz: Bob Fosse and the Hollywood Renaissance of the 1970s-Professor Dennis Bingham

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Professor Dennis Bingham, English Life, Death, and All That Jazz: Bob Fosse and the Hollywood Renaissance of the 1970s There is more to Bob Fosse (1927-1987) than derby hats and finger snaps. How did Fosse change Hollywood cinema and American culture in ways, which though not always positive, have been lasting and pervasive? RSVP:libarsvp@iupui.eduwithDennis Bingham talkin the subject line.

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A Shot Away: Stones, Angels, and Murder at Altamont-Professor Mitchell Douglas

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Professor Mitchell Douglas, English A Shot Away: Stones, Angels, and Murder at Altamont The Rolling Stones concert at Altamont Speedway in December 1969 was marred by an alcohol-fueled security force of Hells Angels, and the gang's murder of a Berkeley teen. Examine a pivotal time in rock history through lyric and persona poetry. RSVP:libarsvp@iupui.eduwithMitchell Douglas talkin the subject line.

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2015 Taylor Symposium

Details to follow. Hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Office of Development and External Affairs and the Department of Religious Studies

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A Celebration of Scholarship: The Liberal Arts Honors Convocation

A Celebration of Scholarship: The Liberal Arts Honors Convocation Student Recipient Registration at 2:15 pm General Registration and Reception at 2:30 pm Program begins promptly at 3:00 pm Further details to follow. Hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Office of Development and External Affairs

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