Individualized Major Program

Reading at the Table/The History of Blood Transfusion in Sub-Saharan Africa

This first extensive study of the practice of blood transfusion in Africa traces the history of one of the most important therapies in modern medicine from the period of colonial rule to independence and the AIDS epidemic. The introduction of transfusion held great promise for improving health, but like most new medical practices, transfusion needed to be adapted to the needs of sub-Saharan Africa, for which there was no analogous treatment in traditional African medicine. This otherwise beneficent medical procedure also created a "royal road" for microorganisms, and thus played a central part in the emergence of human immune viruses in epidemic form. As with more developed health care systems, blood transfusion practices in sub-Saharan Africa were incapable of detecting the emergence of HIV. As a result, given the wide use of transfusion, it became an important pathway for the initial spread of AIDS. Yet African health officials were not without means to understand and respond to the new danger, thanks to forty years of experience and a framework of appreciating long-standing health risks. The response to this risk, detailed in this book, yields important insight into the history of epidemics and HIV/AIDS. Drawing on research from colonial-era governments, European Red Cross societies, independent African governments, and directly from health officers themselves, this book is the only historical study of the practice of blood transfusion in Africa. The History of Blood Transfusion in Sub-Saharan Africa. Retrieved from http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-history-of-blood-transfusion-in-sub-saharan-africa-william-h-schneider/1114002445?ean=9780821420379

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Mrs. Skinner's Hernia, or How Local Governments aided Hoosier Soldiers' Families during the Civil War

The Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Anita Morgan, History; Women's Studies Mrs. Skinner's Hernia, or How Local Governments aided Hoosier Soldiers' Families during the Civil War From repairing hernias to awarding monthly stipends, many Indiana counties went to great lengths to care forsoldiers' families. Hear how county governments attempted to give consistent relief when aid supplied by private philanthropy was intermittent and unreliable (and probably did not include hernia repair). RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Anita Morgan talk in the subject line

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Reading at the Table/Searching for the New Black Man: Black Masculinity and Women's Bodies

"Both historical and topical, The Search for the New Black Man provides new insights as it contextualizes Walter Mosley's Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned in the tradition of the neo-slave narrative and President Obama's autobiography against DuBois's Dark Princess. Professor Ronda Henry Anthony carries the conversation from the historical sources into our lives, opening conversations crucial to our understanding of black masculinities and their implications for America in the 21st century." andmdash;Missy Dehn Kubitschek, professor of English, Africana studies, women's studies, and American studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis "At this crucial juncture in our nation's history when the most powerful black man in America and arguably the world resides in the White House and also identifies as a feminist and endorses gay rights, Searching for the New Black Man intervenes to help us make sense of it all historically, including the link between black feminist agitation and how black men, like Barack Obama, understand and negotiate their masculinity today. Her critical engagement with the challenges of crafting a progressive, pro-feminist black masculinity is not only timely but wickedly insightful. Rather than just rehearse a romanticized vision of transformative black feminist politics as it informs new modes of progressive black masculinities, Henry interrogates the obstaclesandmdash;ideological and materialandmdash;that have made achieving such masculine ideals so elusive intraracially from slavery to the present day. In a word, Searching for the New Black Man makes a substantial contributions to black masculinity and feminist scholarship." andmdash;David Ikard, associate professor of English at Florida State University and author of Breaking the Silence: Towards a Black Male Feminist Criticism Searching for the New Black Man: Black Masculinity and Women’s Bodies, Barnes and Noble,. Retrieved from http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/searching-for-the-new-black-man-ronda-c-henry-anthony/1113632717?ean=9781628461800

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2015 Taylor Symposium: Encountering Religions Through Performance

Encountering Religions Through Performance Chanting the Qur’an, tending to deities, dancing to drums, singing spirituals: people experience their religions through many kinds of performance. Performance also provides ways to encounter others’ religions, often serving as an initial introduction to traditions from different communities and cultures. Urban settings include a multiplicity of religious "performances" and a breadth of religious practice. The 26th Joseph T. Taylor Symposium will explore Indianapolis’s religious diversity and provide attendees opportunities to witness and discuss religion’s performative aspects. Luncheon Performance and Discussion: Sancocho Music and Dance Collage Sancocho is a musical group dedicated to researching and performing African-derived music and dance from Spanish-speaking cultures of the Caribbean. (The term "Sancocho" comes from the name of a stew in Latin America that combines meats, vegetables and spices to create a unique taste.) Sancocho uses various percussion instruments to underscore the strong African retentions found in the black diaspora. The term "edutainment" best describes the group in that the main audiences are children, universities, and public festivals. Iris Rosa and Anthony Artis founded the ensemble in 1995. Luncheon seating is limited and requires registration and pre-payment. Morning sessions are free. The Joseph Taylor Symposium The Joseph T. Taylor Symposium honors Dr. Taylor for his many contributions to the university and to the community by hosting informed discussion on issues of interest in urban America, particularly among communities of color. The Joseph T. Taylor Symposium is offered in celebration of all Dr. Taylor stood for during his lifetime and stands as a lasting legacy to his vision and life work. Hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Office of Development and External Affairs and the Department of Religious Studies

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Crafting the Past: Heritage and California Mission Models

The Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, Museum Studies Crafting the Past: Heritage and California Mission Models The history of the charming, seemingly benign models of California missions that have been crafted and displayed over the past century reveal both the persistence of informal heritage practices and subtle power of landscape to shape perceptions of the past. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Elizabeth Kryder-Reid talk in the subject line

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In the Year of Our Lord 1844: When Religion Became American

The Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Philip Goff, Religious Studies In the Year of Our Lord 1844: When Religion Became American In 1844, riots over Bible reading in public schools killed seventeen people, Jesus' failure to appear as predicted left thousands homeless, and a mob murdered Mormon prophet Joseph Smith. Millions of americans sought and updated understanding of the nation's purpose and a different way to discuss issues publicly. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Philip Goff talk in the subject line

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Educating, Enculturating and Empowering International Teaching Assistants (ITAs)

The Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Aye Nu Duerksen, English Educating, Enculturating and Empowering International Teaching Assistants (ITAs) As IUPUI internationalizes and expands its graduate programs, many schools provide international graduate students assistantships to assist in undergraduate programs. Explore trends of effective screening processes and training programs. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Aye Nu Duerksen talk in the subject line

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Lead, Blood and Ink: Surgeons, Life Writing and Medical Status in the American Civil War

The Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Jane Schultz, English Lead, Blood and Ink: Surgeons, Life Writing and Medical Status in the American Civil War The unprecedented supply of wounded and sick bodies that confronted Civil War surgeons and the concomitant spectacle of death that gripped the public imagination ironically raised physicians' professional status and brought medicine to the center of a cultural dialogue once reserved for the clergy. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Jane Schultz talk in the subject line

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Reading at the Table/The Devil Likes to Sing

It's C. S. Lewis (The Screwtape Letters) meets Christopher Moore (Lamb) in this quirky fable about human aspirations and the nature of temptation. Timothy McFarland is a failed theology student turned gift book writer. His 101 Good Things about Christmas has sold millions. But Timothy finds that his success has changed nothing; in fact, he seems more stuck in his life than ever. Wanting to be more than a rich hack, he is confronted by Lucifer, a Wagner-loving devil who offers to mold Timothy into a serious writer by teaching him to take a colder look at life. And it works. Timothy is published in the right literary and commercial venues, and there's talk of The Great American Novel. Along the way, Timothy and the devil are having a grand time, talking religion, catching bad Elvis impersonators at the casinos, and watching devil-cam, Lucifer's ultimate home video network. But there's a final step Timothy must take. Can he write coolly about a tragedy that unfolds before his eyes, as the devil urges? Will he take on the full weight of the devil's writing gift and make it his own? All he has to do is change who he really is. Retrieved from: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-devil-likes-to-sing-thomas-j-davis/1119003500?ean=9781610979535

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Math, Fiction and the World: An Inquiry into the Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics

The Liberal Atrs Sabbatical Speaker Series Cornelis De Waal, Philosophy Math, Fiction and the World: An Inquiry into the Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics With its wildly exotic creations, most view mathematics as a product of the human mind. If so, how does it do so well in describing and predicting natural phenomena? Relationships between art, mathematics, logic and physics may provide the answer. RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Cornelis De Waal talk in the subject line

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Placemaking Along the Indianapolis Cultural Trail

The Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series Owen Dwyer, Geography Placemaking Along the Indianapolis Cultural Trail Hailed by urban designers and critics at its 2011 debut, the Indianapolis Cultural Trail connects many of the city's attractions. What can we learn about the Trailandmdash;and the coalition that built itandmdash;from the vantage of placemaking? RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Owen Dwyer talk in the subject line

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Reading at the Table/Praying Drunk

The characters in Praying Drunk speak in tongues, torture their classmates, fall in love, hunt for immortality, abandon their children, keep machetes beneath passenger seats, and collect porcelain figurines. A man crushes pills on the bathroom counter while his son watches from the hallway; missionaries clumsily navigate an uprising with barbed wire and broken glass; a boy disparages memorized scripture, facedown on the asphalt, as he fails to fend off his bully. From Kentucky to Florida to Haiti, these seemingly disparate lives are woven together within a series of nested repetitions, enacting the struggle to remain physically and spiritually alive throughout the untamable turbulence of their worlds. In a masterful blend of fiction, autobiography, and surrealism, Kyle Minor shows us that the space between fearlessness and terror is often very small. Long before Praying Drunk reaches its plaintive, pitch-perfect end, Minor establishes himself again and again as one of the most talented younger writers in America. Praying Drunk, Barnes and Noble. Retrieved from http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/praying-drunk-kyle-minor/1114937818?ean=9781936747634

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2015 Chancellor's Academic Honors Convocation

The Chancellor's Academic Honors Convocation is a celebration of the outstanding achievements made by IUPUI faculty and students across all areas of IUPUI’s mission: excellence in teaching and learning; excellence in research, scholarship, and creative activity; excellence in civic engagement; and excellence in diversity, collaboration, and best practices. The 2015 Chancellor's Academic Honors Convocation will be held on Friday, April 24, 2015, in the Hine Hall Auditorium on the IUPUI Campus.

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A Celebration of Scholarship: The Liberal Arts Honors Convocation

A Celebration of Scholarship: The Liberal Arts Honors Convocation Student Recipient Registration at 2:15 pm General Registration and Reception at 2:30 pm Program begins promptly at 3:00 pm Further details to follow. Hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Office of Development and External Affairs

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