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Teaching Writing Certificate Faculty


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Teaching Literature Certificate Faculty


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The Multicultural Literature Minor


The minor in multicultural literature is designed for students who are interested in the rich literature originating from and reflective of the experiences of women, minorities, indigenous people, and immigrants in the United States, as well as literatures from the Western and non-Western worlds.

A minor in Multicultural Literature (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Electives:
Choose 5 courses (15 credit hours) from the following:

ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 245 Introduction to Caribbean Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 364 Native American Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 370 Recent Black Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-L 378 Studies in Women and Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 379 Minority and Ethnic Literature of the United Sates (3 cr.)
ENG-L 382 Fiction of the Non-Western World: 20th Century African Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 406 Topics in African American Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 411 Working Class Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 411 South African Literature and Society (3 cr.)
SPAN-S 360 Introduction to Hispanic Literature
SPAN-S 470 Women and Hispanic Literature (3 cr.)
SPAN-S 472 Spanish American Literature 2 (3 cr.)
SPAN-S 477 Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Prose Fiction (3 cr.)

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Multicultural Literature Checksheet, click here.

 

Director of Literature:
Professor Jane E. Schultz
Email: jschult@iupui.edu
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA), Room 501R

 

Student News


 

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Alumni News


 

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English Department News


 

News About Students

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Advising for Students


 

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English Department Advising


 

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Teaching Literature Certificate Learning Outcomes


 

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Resources for EAP Students


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Student Awards

EAP W001 Award
This award of $50 is presented to an IUPUI undergraduate student for an outstanding essay originating in an English for Academic Purposes W001 class in the past 12 months. Each student may submit up to 2 pieces.

EAP W131 Award
This award of $50 is presented to an IUPUI undergraduate student for an outstanding essay originating in an English for Academic Purposes W131 class in the past 12 months. Each student may submit up to 2 pieces.

 


 

 

 

Teaching Literature Certificate Courses


 

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Teaching Literature Certificate Requirements


 

Download theTeaching Literature Certificate Requirements here

The Writing and Literacy Minor


The minor in writing will help students develop their abilities to write for personal, civic, professional, and academic purposes. The minor introduces students to:

• the discipline of writing studies
• the professional possibilities for writers
• the public uses of writing
• the social issues implicated in language use.

A minor in writing complements many majors and can help you use writing to enhance your career in various professions, business, non-profit and government work, as well as graduate study in the humanities and social sciences, law, and library and information sciences.

A minor in Writing (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Gateway Course:
Choose one course (3 credits) from the following:

ENG-W210 Literacy and Public Life
ENG-W231 Professional Writing
ENG-W270 Writing Argument


Electives:
Choose 4 courses (12 credit hours) from the following:

ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life (3 cr.)
ENG-W 231 Professional Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 262 Style and Voice for Writers (3 cr.)
ENG-W 270 Writing Argument (3 cr.)
ENG-W 280 Literary Editing and Publishing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 312 Writing Biography (3 cr.)
ENG-W 313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose (3 cr.)
ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web (3 cr.)
ENG-W 318 Finding Your E Voice (3 cr.)
ENG-W 320 Advanced Writing in the Arts and Sciences
ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 366 Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities (3 cr.)
ENG-W 377 Writing for Social Change
ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 398 Writing Internship: The News Bureau (3 cr.)
ENG-W 400 Issues in Teaching Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 412 Literacy and Technology (3 cr.)
ENG-W 426 Writing Nonfiction: Popular and Professional Publication (3 cr.)
ENG-W 496 Writing Tutor Training Seminar (3 cr.)
ENG-Z 204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage (3 cr.)
ENG-Z 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.)

With permission from the Director of Writing, one course from a related program, such as Technical Communications, Communications Studies, or Journalism, can be approved as counting toward the minor.

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Writing and Literacy Checksheet, click here.

 

Director of Writing:
Professor Steve Fox
E-mail: sfox@iupui.edu
Telephone: (317) 278-2054
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA) 423B

 

The Professional and Public Writing Minor


The minor in professional and public writing, combined with various majors, introduces you to writing in the workplace and/or public sphere. You will find such writing valuable in occupations that include business, education, public affairs, government, health fields, and not-for-profit organizations, as well as in civic life.

A minor in Professional and Public Writing (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Gateway Courses (3 Credits):
Choose one course from the following:

For a professional focus:
ENG-W 231 Professional Writing P: W131

For a public focus:
ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life
ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing

Electives:
Choose four courses (12 credits) from the following:

ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life if not already taken as gateway
ENG-W 231 Professional Writing if not already taken as gateway
ENG-W 262 Style and Voice for Writers
ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing
ENG-W 313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose
ENG-W: 315 Writing for the Web
ENG-W: 318 Finding your E-Voice
ENG-W 320 Advanced Writing in the Arts and Sciences
ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing
ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing
ENG-W 366 Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities
ENG-W 377 Writing for Social Change
ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing, including Health Literacy, Medical Writing, etc.
ENG-W 398 Writing Internship: The News Bureau
ENG-W 412 Technology and Literacy
ENG-W 426 Writing Nonfiction: Popular and Professional Publication
ENG-Z 204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage
ENG-E 498 Internship

With permission from the Director of Writing, one course from a related program, such as Technical Communications, Communications Studies, or Journalism can be approved as counting toward this minor.

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Professional and Public Writing Checksheet, click here.

 

Director of Writing: 
Professor Steve Fox
Email: sfox@iupui.edu
Telephone: (317) 278-2054
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA) 423B

 

The Literature Minor


Students concentrating in other aspects of English studies, especially Creative Writing or Film majors, will find that a Literature minor makes good sense. The Literature minor can also be a meaningful complement to many Liberal Arts majors besides English, including History,  Philosophy, Religious Studies, World Languages, and Anthropology.  And students from outside of Liberal Arts will find the Literature minor of use, such as those who are Psychology majors or students in the Schools of Education and Public and Environmental Affairs.

Regardless of whether or not you’re an English major, taking five courses in Literature can be accomplished with a little strategic planning. Students may choose from a broad range of courses, at the 200-level or above, offered every term. Three courses (or 9 hours) must be at the 300- or 400-level. For questions about the minor, please contact Jane Schultz, Professor of English and Director of Literature at jschult@iupui.edu.

A minor in Literature (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Select from the following:
ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation
ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama
ENG-L 204 Introduction to Fiction
ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry
ENG-L 207 Women and Literature
ENG-L 213 Literary Masterpieces I
ENG-L 214 Literary Masterpieces II
ENG-L 220 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENG-L 245 Introduction to Caribbean Literature
ENG-L 301 Critical and Historical Survey of English Literature I
ENG-L 302 Critical and Historical Survey of English Literature II
ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare
ENG-L 348 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction
ENG-L 351 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature, 1800-1865
ENG-L 352 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature, 1870-1920
ENG-L 354 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature since 1914
ENG-L 357 Twentieth-Century American Poetry
ENG-L 358 Twentieth-Century American Fiction
ENG-L 364 Native American Literature
ENG-L 370 Recent Black American Writing
ENG-L 372 Contemporary American Fiction
ENG-L 373 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature (Variable Topics)
ENG-L 376 Literature for Adolescents
ENG-L 378 Studies in Women and Literature
ENG-L 379 American Ethic and Minority Literature
ENG-L 381 Recent Writing: Indiana Authors
ENG-L 382 Fiction of the Non-Western World: 20th-Century African Fiction
ENG-L 384 Studies in American Culture (Variable Topics)
ENG-L 385 Science Fiction
ENG-L 390 Children’s Literature
ENG-L 406 Topics in African American Literature
ENG-L 411 Literature and Society (Variable Topics)
ENG-L 431 Topics in Literary Study
ENG-L 433 Conversations with Shakespeare
ENG-L 440 Senior Seminar in English and American Literature
ENG-L L431/L680/M592 Literature and Medicine

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Literature Checksheet, click here.

 

Director of Literature:
Professor Jane E. Schultz
Email: jschult@iupui.edu
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA), Room 501R

 

The Professional and Digital Writing Minor


The minor in professional and digital writing helps prepare students for the communicative demands of their future careers, focusing on the kinds of writing practiced across a range of contexts and in a variety of media.

These courses will guide students into a deeper understanding of writing and composing practices and provide authentic writing experiences.

A minor in Professional and Digital Writing (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Gateway Courses (3 Credits):
Choose one course from the following:

ENG W231 Professional Writing ( P: W131)
ENG W210 Literacy and Public Life
In some cases, an equivalent course may be substituted if approved by the Director of Writing.

Professional Writing Electives (3 Credits):
Choose one course from the following:

ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life if not already taken as gateway
ENG-W 231 Professional Writing if not already taken as gateway
ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing
ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing
ENG-W 377 Writing for Social Change
ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing as approved, including Medical Writing
ENG-W 398 Writing Internship: The News Bureau
ENG-W 426 Writing Nonfiction: Popular and Professional Publication

Digital Composing Electives (3 Credits):
Choose one course from the following:

ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web
ENG-W 318 Finding your E-Voice
ENG-W 367 Writing for Multiple Media
ENG-W 412 Technology and Literacy

Additional Electives (6 Credits):
Choose two courses from either list above and/or the following:

ENG-W 262 Style and Voice for Writers
ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing
ENG-W 312 Writing Biography
ENG-W 313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose
ENG-W 320 Advanced Writing in the Arts and Sciences
ENG-W 366 Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities
ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing
ENG-W 400 Issues in Teaching Writing
ENG-W 496 Writing Tutor Training Seminar (P: W131 and permission of instructor)
ENG-E 498 Internship
ENG-Z 204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Professional and Digital Writing Checksheet, click here.

 

Director of Writing:
Professor Steve Fox
Email: sfox@iupui.edu
Telephone: (317) 278-2054
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA) 423B

The Film Studies Minor


The minor in film studies provides the skills for understanding film in its aesthetic, popular, and ideological dimensions. Students with a minor in film studies will have a knowledge of film history, theory of film, genres and authorship, interpretive approaches to films, and film as a cultural artifact.

A minor in Film Studies (FILM) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:


To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website.  Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

Required:
FILM-C 292 Introduction to Film (3 cr.)

Electives:
Choose twelve credit hours (12 cr.) from the following courses:


*C390 and C392 may be repeated for credit with different topics

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Film Studies Checksheet, click here

 

Director of Film Studies Program:
Professor Dennis Bingham
E-mail: dbingham@iupui.edu
Telephone: (317) 274-9825
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA) 501V

 

The Linguistics Minor


The minor in linguistics is intended for students who wish to expand their knowledge of language structure and use. This program of study provides an excellent foundation in linguistic theory and application.

A minor in Linguistics (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Required:
ENG- Z205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.)

Electives:
Choose 12 credit hours from the following courses:

Anthropology
ANTH L300 Language and Culture (3 cr.)
ANTH L401 Language, Power, and Gender (3 cr.)

American Sign Language/ Interpretation
ASL L340 Discourse Analysis:  English (3 cr.)
ASL L342 Disclosure Analysis:  ASL (3 cr.)
   
Philosophy

PHIL P265 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (3 cr.)
PHIL P368 Philosophy of Language (3 cr.)

English
ENG Z205 Introduction to the English Language (Core course) (3 cr.)
ENG Z206 Introduction to Language Use (3 cr.)
ENG Z301 History of the English Language (3 cr.)
ENG Z302 Understanding Language Structure: Syntax (3 cr.)
ENG Z303 Understanding Language Meaning: Semantics (3 cr.)
ENG Z310 Language in Context: Sociolinguistics (3 cr.)
ENG Z400 Teaching English for Specific Purposes (3 cr.)
ENG Z405 Topics in the Study of Language (Topics may vary each semester) (3 cr.)
ENG Z432 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)
ENG Z434 Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (3 cr.)
ENG Z441 Materials Preparation for ESL Instruction (3 cr.)
ENG W310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.)

World Languages and Cultures
FREN F402 Introduction to French linguistics (3 cr.)
FREN F421 Fourth- Year French (3 cr.)
FREN F423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.)
GER G340 German language and Society: Past and Present (3 cr.)
GER G465 The Structure of German (3 cr.)
GER G333 German translation Practice (3 cr.)
GER G423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.)
SPAN S323 Introduction to Translation Spanish and English (3 cr.)
SPAN S326 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.)
SPAN S409 Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.)
SPAN S410 The Acquisition of Spanish (3 cr.)
SPAN S423 the Craft of Translation (3 cr.)
SPAN S425 Spanish Phonetics (3 cr.)
SPAN S427 The Structure of Spanish (3 cr.)
SPAN S428 Applied Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.)
WLAC F350 Introduction to Translation Studies and Interpreting (3 cr.)
WLAC F330 Introduction to Translating French and English (3 cr.)
WLAC F450 Computers in Translation (3 cr.)

In consultation with an advisor, advanced students may request permission to take a graduate course in linguistics in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the minor.

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Linguistics Checksheet, click here.


Director of Linguistics Undergraduate Program:
Professor Fred DiCamilla
E-mail: fdicamil@iupui.edu
Telephone: (317) 274-04804
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA), 501T

 

 

The Creative Writing Minor


The minor in creative writing is designed for students interested in producing original poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, or screenwriting. It is also useful for those contemplating careers in the teaching of writing.

A minor in Creative Writing (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Electives:
Choose 15 credit hours from the following:

ENG-W 206 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 207 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 208 Introduction to Poetry Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 280 Literary Editing and Publishing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.)
ENG-W 302 Screenwriting (3 cr.)
ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
ENG-W 305 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3 cr.)
ENG-W 401 Writing Fiction (3 cr.)
ENG-W 403 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 407 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing (3 cr.)
ENG-W 408 Creative Writing for Teachers (3 cr.)
ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.)
    - W 411 may be repeated once for credit

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or on the English department website. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the Minor in Creative Writing Checksheet, click here

 

Director of Creative Writing:
Professor Mitchell Douglas
E-mail: mildougl@indiana.edu
Telephone: (317) 278-0421
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA) 502N

 

The General Minor in English


The general English minor is designed for students who are not majoring in English but who want broad experience across the fields of the discipline, including creative writing, film studies, language and linguistics, literature, and writing and literacy.
 

A minor in English (ENG) requires satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

 

Electives:
Choose 15 credit hours from the following:

Courses in Creative Writing (ENG-W)
Courses in Film Studies (FILM-C)
Courses in Linguistics (ENG-Z)
Courses in Literature (ENG-L)
Courses in Writing and Literacy (ENG-W)

 

To officially declare the minor, complete an English minor form available in CA 423 or here. Return the form to CA 423 or email it to lead undergraduate advisor Francia Kissel (fkissel@iupui.edu).

For a PDF of the General Minor in English Checksheet, click here

 

For more information, or to plan your minor, contact:
Professor Francia Kissel
Lead Undergraduate Advisor in English
E-mail: fkissel@iupui.edu
Telephone: (317) 278-8584
Office: Cavanaugh Hall (CA) 500

 

Minors in English


NewMinors

The English Department at IUPUI offers several minors, including four new ones:

 

 To declare a Minor in English, download this form

Teaching Literature Certificate


View the Certificate brochure here: Teaching Literature Certificate

 

 

 

For more information, contact:
Jane E. Schultz
Director of Literature
Professor of English
jschult@iupui.edu
317 274 0082

Writing Program

Writing Course Placement Information for Non-Native Speakers of English

What is the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Program?

The English Department Writing Program courses are designed for native speakers of English. The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Program teaches courses for non-native speakers.

IUPUI requires most non-native speakers of English to take the EAP Placement Test before attending New Student Orientation. The EAP Test results will indicate whether a student should take courses in the EAP Program or in the Writing Program. Students who demonstrate native-like proficiency on the EAP Test are referred to take courses in the Writing Program.

NOTE: If you are an international student, your admission letter from the Office of International Affairs will indicate whether you are required to take the EAP Placement Test.

I am not an international student. Should I follow the English Guided Self-Placement Process or take the IUPUI EAP Placement Test?

The following guidelines will help you determine whether you should take the EAP Placement Test or complete the Guided Self-Placement Process to place yourself in one of the Writing Program Courses:

 

Writing Program

Placing into Writing Program Courses

Most students entering IUPUI do not take a placement test for writing. Instead, they must complete the online Guided Self-Placement process before attending orientation.

NOTE: It is important that you read this information carefully and identify yourself as accurately as possible. Choosing the appropriate courses for yourself will help you succeed at IUPUI.

The Guided Self-Placement Process consists of two steps:

  1. Students review information about the first-year writing classes on the Guided Self-Placement website and reflect on their skills and experience with writing.
  2. Students choose the appropriate course and submit their selection. This selection should be discussed with an advisor at orientation.

Students are welcome to call the Writing Program office at 317-274-3824 if they have any questions.
 

Guided Self-Placement website

Placement Information for Non-Native Speakers of English



 

Writing Program

Faculty Awards and Honors


The Barbara E. Zimmer Associate Faculty Award

The Barbara E. Zimmer Award, which is designed to encourage professional development, was established in 1997 through the generosity of Barbara Zimmer, a long-time associate faculty member in the IUPUI writing program and ESL program. The award pays travel expenses (at least $500) for a writing program associate faculty member to attend a conference or workshop (see below for a list of conferences). You don’t need to present a paper or workshop (although presenting isn’t ruled out by the award). The application form can be downloaded here.

Who can apply?
Members of the associate faculty who:

What criteria are used to judge applications?
The Writing Coordinating Committee encourages applications from all associate faculty, especially those who have taught writing at IUPUI for at least 3 semesters and plan to continue. In considering applications, the committee may consider an applicant’s past involvement with program activities and/or the applicant’s proposed future involvement with activities such as:


Members of the Committee will evaluate applications, looking to see whether:



When are applications due?

Applications are due January 16.


How are applications submitted?

It’s an easy process. You need only fill out a short application form and submit a short description of the conference you wish to attend.

List of eligible conferences
Generally, these conferences include:


Don’t see a conference you’d like to attend?

If you don’t see a conference listed here that offers you the kind of professional development you’d like, you can request another conference on your application form. Provide a bit more detail about the conference and its sponsoring organization, so that the application review committee can decide whether the conference fits in with the theme of the Zimmer Award.

 


The Writing Program Outstanding Associate Faculty Award

Presented annually. The winner of this award is nominated for the SLA Outstanding Associate Faculty Award.

 

Writing Program

Faculty Policies

Classroom Policies

 

Handling Issues of Plagiarism  

 

General Grading Information

 

Credit for Writing Courses


 

 

Writing Program

Faculty Teaching Resources


Teaching Resources at IUPUI

 

Professional Associations and Conferences

 

Journals and Bibliographies

 

Professional Guidelines for Faculty

 

Writing Program

Faculty Technology Resources


Technology in the Classroom

The Writing Program supports writing teachers who wish to integrate technology into their pedagogy. The Technology Resources for Writing Classes site is a helpful resource for teaching in computer classrooms or using technology in your teaching.

You’ll also want to check out Activities for Teaching Using Technology for a collection of class activities and examples of specific ways instructional technology can help composition students succeed. Please contact Julie Freeman, Instructional Technology Coordinator for the Writing Program, if you have any questions.

 

Reserving Computer Classrooms (Student Technology Centers, or STCs)

If you do not teach in a computer classroom and would like to reserve one (on a one-time basis), check out the information about the Student Technology Centers

 

Free Software

Download free software from IUWare

 

Getting answers to technology-related questions

University Integrated Technology Services (UITS) Classes

University Integrated Technology Services (UITS) offers 3-hour classes for faculty and staff covering skills such as Adobe, Excel, Dreamweaver, Podcasting, and many more. For more information, access IT Training and Education at 274-7383.

 

Writing Program

For Faculty—Course Overviews and Curriculum Guides


Course Overviews and Curriculum Guides




 

Writing Program

For Writing Program Faculty

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Writing Program Student Awards and Honors

The Hal Tobin Award

This $150 award honors outstanding writing in English W131 or W140. It is presented each year at the department’s honors ceremony. Download an application and award information here.

EAP W001 Award

This award of $50 is presented to an IUPUI undergraduate student for an outstanding essay originating in an English for Academic Purposes W001 class in the past 12 months. Each student may submit up to 2 pieces.

EAP W131 Award

This award of $50 is presented to an IUPUI undergraduate student for an outstanding essay originating in an English for Academic Purposes W131 class in the past 12 months. Each student may submit up to 2 pieces.

For more student awards and information about how to apply for them, visit the Department of English Student Awards, Grants and Scholarships page.

 

Writing Program

For Writing Program Students

  

Writing Program

Writing Program Administrators

Steve Fox, Director of Writing, handles general policy matters. CA 423B; 278-2054; sfox@iupui.edu.

Jennifer Mahoney, Interim University Writing Center Director, staffs the University Writing Center, orients new tutors through W396, leads professional development for the center, monitors and updates the services the center provides, and handles student concerns about their experience in the center. CA 505; 278-2984; jpmahone@iupui.edu.

Julie Freeman,Associate Director of Writing, handles course staffing, scheduling, comparable credit petitions, grade complaints, and general policy matters. CA 423D; 274-0092; jfreema@iupui.edu.

Scott Weeden, W130 Course Coordinator, consults on staffing of W130, orients new W130 faculty, leads professional development for all W130 faculty, monitors and updates features of the course (curriculum, textbooks, assignments, etc.), and handles student concerns about their experience in W130. CA 423C; 274-9670; sweeden@iupui.edu.

David Sabol, W131 Course Coordinator, consults on staffing of W131, orients new W131 faculty, leads professional development for all W131 faculty, monitors and updates features of the course (curriculum, textbooks, assignments, etc.), and handles student concerns about their experience in W131. Taylor Hall UC 2139; 274-2508; dsabol@iupui.edu.  

Gail Bennett-Edelman, W231 Course Coordinator, consults on staffing of W231, orients new W231 faculty, monitors and updates features of W231 (curriculum, textbooks, assignments, etc.), handles student concerns about their experience in W231. CA 429E; 278-8583; gcbennet@iupui.edu. 

Mel Wininger, W270 and Honors Writing Coordinator, consults on staffing of W140 and honors sections of W270, orients new faculty and leads professional development for all W270 faculty, monitors and updates features of honors writing courses (curriculum, textbooks, assignments, etc.), and handles student concerns about their experience. CA 343E; 278-8581; mrwining@iupui.edu.

Beth Lafferty, the Writing Program Secretary, handles general inquiries. CA 423; 274-3824; bethlaff@iupui.edu.

 

Check the list of writing program faculty for campus contact information (email, campus phone number, office location). Writing instructors can also be located through the English department main office (CA 502, 274-2258 for full time faculty) and the associate faculty office (CA 313, 274-0570 for part-time faculty).

  

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Teaching Writing Certificate Learning Outcomes


Students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing will demonstrate the following upon completion of their degree:

Knowledge


Understanding


Application

 

 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Master’s Thesis FAQ

The Director of Graduate Studies answers some frequently asked questions about the thesis writing process.

What is a Master’s thesis?
A Master’s thesis is a focused, medium-length (40-80 pages including bibliography and notes) research and writing project that makes a clear and original contribution to an ongoing conversation in a particular field.

Who should write a thesis?
Students who have one or more of the following traits typically enjoy thesis writing: a strong and abiding interest in a particular subject or topic; an inclination to do focused, independent work requiring months of concentrated effort with little oversight or instruction; a love of the writing and revision process; a need to pose and seek answers to specific questions; a desire to communicate acquired knowledge to an audience of one’s peers. Students planning to go on to the PhD often choose to write a thesis, as do those who are committed to finishing their degrees in two years. In contrast to this is the student who loves the variety and social aspect of coursework but tends to feel lost when asked to work alone on a long and complex project. Students of this type should make sure they have a strong support group in place before committing to the writing of a thesis.

What’s the difference between a Master’s thesis and a doctoral dissertation?
A doctoral dissertation is often defined as "a book-length work of publishable quality." As such, it is usually divided into chapters and covers a fairly broad area, for example, the entire output of a major author, or works by multiple authors. A Master’s thesis, by contrast, is much shorter and more narrowly focused than this. Usually an MA thesis is divided into short (10-20 page) sections rather than longer (25-40 page) chapters. Rather than focusing on all of the works of a particular author, it might focus on one or two. Because of this, it is sometimes observed that a successful doctoral dissertation contains the work of three or more MA-length theses.

What’s the difference between the thesis and the Non-Thesis Option?
The writing of a thesis requires an in-depth study of a particular question in a single field. This usually entails initial coursework in the area, additional work in methodology or theory, exploratory research (usually in the form of an L695 independent reading project), focused writing (usually in the form of a W609 independent writing project), and, at the end of the process, four credit hours of L699. Add it up, and you’re talking about anywhere from 12 to 20 of a total of 36 Masters credits devoted to the thesis. The Non-Thesis option, by contrast, usually is characterized by breadth, not depth. Students following the Non-Thesis Option typically devote all 40 credits of the degree to coursework in two or more subject areas.

What is the role of the thesis committee, and how does one go about choosing one?
You should think of your thesis committee as your chosen group of expert advisors. They are the people you go to for advice and guidance on a whole range of issues, from topic selection to initial research to the writing of the thesis proposal to drafting and revision of the thesis proper. The thesis director should be someone who knows you and your work extremely well. He or she should know the topic area of your thesis and should be able to advise you on potential pitfalls and promising directions in your initial reading and research. Typically your thesis director will read all of the early drafts of your thesis and help you to choose the remaining two members of your committee. These members ought to be knowledgeable in the field but need not have in-depth expertise in your topic area. They should get along well with you and their fellow committee members. Despite their expertise and interest in you and your work, however, you should remember that your committee is not responsible for driving your research and writing process. That’s your job. It’s your thesis, after all.

How long does it take to research and write a thesis?
Full-time students should think of the writing of a thesis as a yearlong project beginning in the spring semester of their first year and ending in the spring or early summer of their second year. Part-time students typically take a little longer but should remember that the thesis must be finished by the end of their fifth year in the program.

What are the steps involved in writing a thesis?
The first step is to choose a topic and a thesis director. Next is the writing of the thesis proposal, which entails a significant narrowing of the topic and the development of a focused research question or, better yet, a clear statement of your precise position on the topic. The third step is to write and get feedback on your first chapter and all subsequent chapters (or sections) of the thesis. The fourth step is to get final feedback on a complete draft of your thesis. The fifth step is to use this feedback to make final revisions to the thesis. The final step is to submit the revised thesis in a format acceptable to the graduate school. Each of these steps is important, and none of them can be rushed or skipped over without problems arising as a result. A good way to manage these steps is to include several of them as part of the work done in L695 and W609.

What are some typical pitfalls to avoid in the thesis planning and writing process?
Here are some big ones: (1) choosing a topic you have no real excitement about, (2) choosing a topic that is too broad and/or ambitious, (3) moving from the proposal stage to the writing stage without a highly refined research question or statement of position on the topic, (4) signing up for L699 too early-before you’ve completed and revised the opening section of the thesis, (5) taking coursework while you’re supposed to be writing your thesis, (6) writing a thesis that presents your research and reading but makes no real argument in the process, (7) reading and taking copious notes on books and articles with no real bearing on your argument, (8) taking too long to write each chapter, and then giving your committee too little time to respond to what you’ve written, (9) not leaving enough time for revision on the basis of committee feedback, (10) procrastination, (11) procrastination, (12) procrastination.

What is the thesis proposal, and what makes for a good one?
The thesis proposal is far more than a form you have to fill out before you will be allowed to enroll in L699 Thesis Credits. It’s more than a statement of your topic and a list of books and articles related to it. Instead, the proposal is the place where you articulate the argument you will make in your thesis, or at the very least, the focused research question that will guide your work. In addition to this, the proposal usually contains a literature review, statement of originality, and a section on methodology. There should be no fuzziness or uncertainty about any of this. If there is, you aren’t ready to begin work on the thesis proper, and your committee will tell you so. Thesis proposals often include bibliographies of works related to the research topic, but in general, an annotated bibliography is less important than a clearly articulated statement of the thesis argument. In other words, don’t let the fact that you have completed an annotated bibliography fool you into believing that you have a workable argument for your thesis. As a rule, plan to do several drafts of the thesis proposal, and don’t be surprised when your committee asks you for significant revisions before they sign. If your idea is cloudy or has other problems, the proposal is the place to confront and fix these problems. The last thing you want to do is to begin writing the thesis when you still have no clear idea of what your argument will be.

What are some important milestones along the thesis path?
The most important ones are these: 1) completion and acceptance of a full and effective thesis proposal, 2) completion and revision of the opening section or chapter of the thesis, 3) completion and submission to your committee of a full draft of the thesis, 4) completion and submission of the final, revised version of your thesis. As a rule, you should have already passed milestones 1 and 2 before you enroll in L699 Thesis Credits.

What are some secrets to writing a good thesis?
Choose a topic you love or at least feel strongly about. That will help you get through the inevitable rough patches you will hit in the process. Ask yourself, "What am I adding to the existing conversation on this topic? How much of what I am saying about the topic has never been said before?" Make an appointment with a research librarian and ask this person for tips on how to go about researching your topic. Meet regularly with two or three other students who are writing theses in order to share drafts and offer encouragement. Use L695 and W609 to write the first half of the thesis. Use L699 to finish it. Make daily progress on your thesis. Work on it with purpose until you have completed the first draft. Don’t procrastinate. Remember to tell the people in your life how much you appreciate their support of your goal of writing a good thesis. Reassure them that the process of writing a thesis is finite and won’t last forever. Remind them that you support them in the fulfillment of their dreams as well, and be true to this promise.

Where can I see a sample thesis?
The library has past master’s theses available in digital format.

 

 

 

 

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Graduate Program Resources


Forms

Thesis

 

Campus Information

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The Graduate Office is a wealth of information for all IUPUI graduate students. Please visit their web page and discover the information, resources and programs available to all graduate students. 

 

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The Office of Student Account Services is the place to go for school financial matters regarding fees, refunds, and includes a Tuition and Fee Estimator program which is updated for every semester.

 

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Sample Paths to the MA in English


Student 1 / Student 2 / Student 3 / Student 4

(cc) = core course

(cp) = certificate program credit


Student #1 - Two Years with Thesis (Literature Concentration)

1st Semester
L506 Intro to Methods of Criticism and Research (cc)  4
L680 Special Topics: Anglophone Caribbean Writers 4

2nd Semester
W509 Intro to Writing and Literacy Studies (cc)  4
L680 Special Topics: Literature of Slavery 4
L590 Internship in English 4

Summer Course
L695 Individual Readings in English 4

3rd Semester
L680 Special Topics: Carribean Women Writers 4
W609 Directed Writing 4

4th Semester
L699 Thesis 4

Total Hours 36

This student entered the program with a very clear idea of what she wanted to accomplish.  She quickly identified her area of study-African American and Anglophone Carribean Writers-and has worked with mentors in that field every step along the way.  Note the strategy of taking a majority of the course work for the MA in the first year in the program in order to free up time to tackle the thesis in the second year.  In this case, both L695 and W609 were directly related to thesis work. 


Student #2: Two Years with Thesis, TESOL Certificate (21 CR)

1st Semester
G500 Intro to the English Language (cc, cp)  4
LING L532 Second Language Acquisition (cp)  3

2nd Semester
W509 Intro to Writing and Literacy Studies (cc)  4
LING L 534 Linguistic Resources and TESOL (cp)  3
LING L 535 Teaching Practicum (cp)  3

Summer Course
G541 Materials Preparation for ESL (cp)  4

3rd Semester
L590 Internship in English  4
LING T 690 Advanced Readings in TESOL (cp)  4

4th Semester
L695 Individual Readings in English  3
L699 Thesis  4

Total Hours 36

This student started out in the TESOL certificate program, then decided to continue past 21 credits and get the MA.  Her later course work and thesis, "Teaching Academic Vocabulary with Corpora: Student Perceptions of Data-Driven Learning," grew out of her early foundational work in Corpus Linguistics and TESOL.


Student #3: Five Years with Thesis, Professional Editing Certificate (15 CR)

1st Semester
L680 Special Topics: Textual Criticism (cp)   4

2nd Semester
W509 Intro to Writing and Literacy Studies (cc)  4

3rd Semester
L506 Intro to Methods of Criticism and Research (cc)  4

4th Semester
L701 Descriptive Bibliography/Textual Problems (cp)  4

5th Semester
L695 Individual Readings in English (cp)  4

6th Semester
L501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (cp)  4

7th Semester
L680 Special Topics: Joyce’s Ulysses  4

8th Semester
L680 Special Topics: Anglophone Caribbean Writers  4

9th Semester
L699 Thesis  4

Total Hours  36

This student maintained a dual focus from the beginning of her program, making steady progress in both the certificate program in textual editing and in the MA program more generally.  Her thesis, a textual analysis of the different published versions of Steven King’s The Gunslinger, grew out of her work in both programs.


Student #4: Five Years, Non-Thesis Option, Teaching Writing Certificate (20 CR)

1st Semester (GCND)
L573 Studies in Literary Appreciation  3
L695 Individual Readings in English  1

2nd Semester (GCND)
G500 Intro to the English Language (cc)  4

3rd Semester (GCND)
W511 Writing Fiction  4

4th Semester
W615 Creative Nonfiction Writing (cp)  4

5th Semester (Summer)
W508 Creative Writing for Teachers (cp)  4

6th Semester
W509 Intro to Writing and Literacy Studies (cc, cp)  4
W609 Directed Writing Projects (cp)  4
W697 Independent Study in Writing (cp)  3

7th Semester
W609 Directed Writing Projects  4
W609 Directed Writing Projects (cp)  1

8th Semester (Summer)
L680 Special Topics: 20th Century African Literature  4

Total Hours  40

This student started out taking courses under Graduate Continuing Non-Degree (GCND) status.  After a break between his fifth and sixth semesters, he returned to the program with a renewed sense of purpose: to simultaneously complete the certificate program in Teaching Writing and the MA under the Non-Thesis option.

 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

MA in English Degree Requirements


The M.A. in English requires 36 credit hours, including:

Thesis Option:

Total:  36 credit hours

Non-thesis Option:

Total: 40 credit hours

Download Non-Thesis Proposal form—pdf / Word

No more than eight credit hours may be transferred from another institution.  Degree requirements (including transfer credits) must be completed within five consecutive years of beginning graduate study that ultimately counts toward the M.A. degree.

Core Courses
At the beginning of your graduate career, you will take two core courses that provide an introduction to major areas in the discipline of English:

Grades
M.A. students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B).

Course Requirements
Students, including those already enrolled in the English MA Program, may select one of the two options outlined below after consulting with the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) in English and/or other faculty advisors in English. Students will then submit a brief written statement to the DGS that presents a rationale for their choice. As can be seen in the following outline of the two alternative courses of study, students who choose not to write a thesis will be required to take eight additional credit hours of course work, for a total of 40 credit hours.

The three core courses, which carry 4 credit hours each, provide an introduction to three major areas in the discipline of English: language (G500 Introduction to the English Language), writing (W509 Introduction to Writing and Literacy Studies), and literature ( L506 Introduction to Methods of Criticism and Research).  Students are required to take two of the three core courses, preferably at the beginning of the graduate program.

Foreign Language Requirements
There is no foreign language requirement, but M.A. students going on for the Ph.D. are encouraged to validate their reading proficiency in a foreign language according to University Graduate School standards.


For more information, download the advising guide above or contact:
Pat King
CA 502L
317-274-2258
patmking@iupui.edu. 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

MA in English Program Admission


Requirements


Grades

M.A. students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B).

All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Graduate Course Descriptions


Internship / Thesis / Linguistics / Literature / Writing / Creative Writing

Graduate Internship

L590 Internship in English (4 - 8 cr)

This is a supervised internship in the uses of language in the workplace (for teachers or prospective teachers, the workplace may be a class).  Each intern will be assigned a problem or new task and will develop the methods for solving the problem or completing the task.  Interns will complete a portfolio of workplace writing and self-evaluation; they will also be visited by a faculty coordinator and evaluated in writing by their on-site supervisors.


Graduate Thesis

L699 M.A. Thesis (4 cr)

This is the course students enroll in during the semester when they are completing their MA theses.


Graduate Linguistics Courses

ENG G500 Introduction to the English Language (4 CR)

An introduction to English linguistics, the course covers the principal areas of linguistic inquiry into the English language: sounds (phonetics and phonology), word structure (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics and pragmatics). Throughout the semester students learn how to apply this knowledge in the analysis of a variety of social, psychological, educational, and cultural issues. The overarching goal of the course is to teach students how to examine the English language in a rigorous and scientific manner, that is, to begin thinking and acting like a linguist.  G500 is the core linguistics course in the M.A. program.

ENG G541 Materials Preparation for ESL Instruction (4 CR)

This course introduces graduate students to the basic principles of second language materials preparation, language course design, and language curriculum design. Students examine principles for the situated adaptation of published teaching materials. Students are introduced to the teaching of English for Specific Purposes (ESP), e.g., business English, medical English, legal English, academic English, and examine principles for the development of ESP language courses and curricula. A final course project involves the development of a Materials Resource Portfolio, both for a specific teaching context and for broader use.

ENG G625 Introduction to Text Linguistics/Discourse Analysis (4 CR)

The course is an introduction to discourse analysis. Written and spoken discourses in a variety of contexts will be studied. Although the emphasis will be on discourses for professional and academic purposes (e.g., business writing, discourse of fundraisers, and academic writing), students wishing to apply linguistic discourse theories to the analysis of literary texts will have an opportunity to do so. Students will learn about theories of discourse, but the focus will be on the basic methods of analysis. Students will be able to apply discourse analysis methods in a data analysis project of their own.  Students are encouraged to take G500 before or concurrent with this course.

ENG G652 English Language Sociolinguistics (4 CR)

This course investigates sociocultural aspects of language use and explores the relationships between language and society. The course provides background in various theoretical and methodological approaches to sociolinguistics. Other topics to be covered include gender and language, ethnicity and language, social factors in language acquisition, and bilingualism. Familiarity with basic issues and concepts in linguistics would be useful. Students are encouraged to take G500 before or concurrent with this course.

LING L532 Second Language Acquisition (3 CR)

This course introduces graduate students to linguistic, psychological, cognitive, social, and sociocultural approaches to second language development. Students explore the relationship between second language development and such topics as age, gender, motivation, cross-linguistic influences, cognition, identity, and micro/macro-sociological affordances and constraints. Students are introduced to the reading and analysis of research articles in the field of second language development and applied linguistics. A final course project involves a mini-case study of a second language learner. Students are encouraged to take G500 before or concurrent with this course.

LING L534 Linguistic Resources for TESOL (3 CR)

This course introduces graduate students to the general principles and practices of second language teaching and assessment as derived from research on second language development and applied linguistics. Students explore the nature of second language learners, contexts for second language instruction, basic forms of classroom discourse and its relation to learning outcomes, and the nature of negotiated interaction, comprehensible input, and pushed output as facilitative conditions for second language learning. The course includes projects that involve the observation and analysis of second language classrooms and the development of principled lesson plans in an extended teaching unit for a particular teaching context.

LING L535 TESOL Practicum (3 CR)

The supervised teaching practicum is a required, semester-long local apprenticeship with a practicing ‘master teacher’ in a teaching context that matches with the candidate’s interests (e.g., basic L2 writing, legal English, L2 speaking, advanced L2 writing). The practicum involves observation and discussion of L2 English teaching as well as guided student teaching and tutoring. A faculty member in the MA Program supervises the student’s apprenticeship with the master teacher. In conjunction with each student, the supervising faculty member develops individualized written requirements for the teaching practicum. The Director of the MA Program makes the practicum placements in consultation with MA faculty.

LING T600 Topics in TESOL and Applied Linguistics (3 CR)

Topics in this course vary.  See the following possible offerings of LING T600.

LING T600 Topics in TESOL and Applied Linguistics: Second Language Learning and Technology (3 CR)

This course introduces advanced graduate students to the implementation of Internet Communication Tools (e.g., email, chat, blogs, podcasting, and video-conferencing) in classroom-based second language learning. Students examine the efficacy of ICTs for the development of grammatical, pragmatic, and intercultural competence. Students further analyze the sound pedagogical application of technology in the language classroom, including corpus-based language instruction. In order to gain experiential knowledge of the use of technology in second language teaching, students may participate in a telecollaborative partnership with learners at a distal location. A final course project involves the development of a technology-enhanced teaching unit for a particular teaching context using a particular ICT.

LING T600 Topics in TESOL and Applied Linguistics: English Teaching Internship (3 CR)

This supervised teaching internship is an optional, extended teaching internship with a practicing ‘master teacher’ in a teaching context that matches with the candidate’s interests. The internship may take place in an international (e.g., China, Korea, Mexico) or local context and may target a specific student population (e.g., Spanish-speaking learners of English, Chinese-speaking learners of English). The internship involves observation and discussion of L2 English teaching as well as guided student teaching and tutoring. A faculty member in the MA Program supervises the student’s apprenticeship with the master teacher. The student must complete a substantial written project during the internship, which will be determined by the supervising faculty member in conjunction with the student. Students may participate in the English teaching internship after completion of LING L535, the English teaching practicum.

LING T660 Contrastive Discourse:  Readings in Linguistics (3 CR)

This course examines contrastive discourse/intercultural rhetoric and considers the cross-cultural aspects of discourse organization from both the reader’s and the writer’s viewpoints. Comparisons of text organization in different genres and for different audiences will be made, studying the roles of cultural forms and schemata in the interaction between writer and reader.  

LING T690 Advanced Readings in TESOL and Applied Linguistics (1 - 4 CR)

Topics in this course vary, but they include the theory and teaching of English for Specific Purposes in academic, professional, or vocational fields; the teaching of second-language writing, reading, listening/speaking, and grammar; and second-language testing and assessment.  

Graduate Literature Courses

ENG L501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (4 CR)

This course examines the materials, tools, and methods of literary research.  Includes work with standard bibliographical sources (both traditional and electronic), bibliographical search strategies, scholarly documentation, accessing special collections, and preparing bibliographical descriptions of subject texts.  Historical case studies reinforce coverage of professional standards of conduct, verification of sources, and thoroughness of research methodology.

ENG L503 Teaching Literature (4 CR)

This course introduces graduate students to the practical and theoretical issues involved in teaching literature, including how to set teaching objectives, organize a course, and construct a syllabus.  We will explore several different approaches to teaching literature, including lecture, discussion, workshop, and online instruction. 

ENG L506 Introduction to Methods of Criticism and Research (4 CR)

This course offers an introduction to literary criticism and research for graduate students.  Students will study a small number of literary works from a variety of critical perspectives and examine the assumptions that inform our own reading and evaluation of literature.

ENG L 508 Practicum in Teaching Literature (4 CR)

This course explores the practical applications of the teaching methodologies introduced in L503 Teaching Literature.  Students teach under the supervision of a member of the English graduate faculty and complete a teaching portfolio and an action research project investigating a specific pedagogical issue.  Prerequisite: L503 or instructor’s consent.

ENG L573 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature (3 CR)

Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature. Topics may vary and include, for example, literature and colonialism, literature and psychoanalysis, or literature and gender. May also include other world literatures.

ENG L606 Topics in African American Literature (4 CR)

Focuses on a particular genre, time period, or theme of African American literature. Examples: twentieth-century African American women’s novels, black male identity in literature, kinship in African American literature, and African American autobiography. May be repeated twice for credit with different focuses.

ENG L625 Shakespeare (4 CR)

In this course we will examine eight of Shakespeare’s plays (and one tragedy by Thomas Middleton) through many different lenses. We will see how the plays might best be understood by approaching them, not only through text and performance, but also through the critical eyes of the New Critic, the Historicist, the Psychoanalytic Critic, the Feminist, and the general reader. Through close critical reading and engagement with performance, we will hopefully come closer to understanding the continuing genius of Early Modern drama.

ENG L641 British Literature before 1900 (4 CR)

This course will survey British literature of the 16th to the 19th centuries.  Particular emphasis will be placed on major writers and movements and on lesser-known writers who have recently been rediscovered.  Categories covered may include: Elizabethan and Jacobean writers, Restoration theatre and poetry, the rise of the novel, Neoclassical writers, Romanticism, Victorian writers.

ENG L643 Readings in Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (4 CR)

The rise of postcolonial studies over the past few decades has attuned readers to the great wealth of literature from colonized and formerly-colonized areas of the world, and to the issues of race, power, and cultural difference surrounding those works.  This course will study major works of colonial and postcolonial literature, primarily in the English-speaking world, as well as related theoretical works and issues.  Global areas covered may include: Africa, the Caribbean, South and Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Australia, and the Pacific Rim.

ENG L649 British Literature since 1900 (4 CR)

This course will survey British literature of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.  Students will study important trends and movements within this field, including Realism, Modernism, Surrealism, and Postmodernism, noting the ways in which these intersect with the conventions of particular genres and with developments in critical theory and social history.

ENG L650 American Literature before 1900 (4 CR)

This course will include critical and historical study of American literary movements (Transcendentalism, Romanticism, Realism, or Naturalism); genres and modes (satire, the romance, the essay, the long poem); or 18th- and 19th-century writers.

ENG L655 American Literature since 1900 (4 CR)

This course provides intensive historical and critical study of American literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Literary movements such as Modernism, Surrealism, Theatre of the Absurd, and Postmodernism will be combined with study of major genres (novels, poems, plays, stories) and authors.

ENG L657 Readings in Literary and Critical Theory (4 CR)

This course will introduce graduate students to the main texts and issues in the field of literary theory as it has developed since the late 18th century.  Literary theory encompasses debates over the definitions of literature, the writer, and the reader; the goals and methods of literary criticism; and the relations between literature, literary criticism, and the wider society.  Students will read important works of literary theory, trace the development of contemporary theoretical approaches, and experiment with applications.  Areas covered may include: formalism, Marxism, feminism, structuralism and post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, new historicism, queer theory, etc.

ENG L666 Children’s Literature (4 CR)

This course addresses the question of how children’s literature reflects cultural views on children as intellectuals. In light of critical debates stemming from canonical children’s texts, we examine the ways in which a variety of authors adapt traditional themes and storytelling structures for an ever-shifting audience.

ENG L673 Studies in Women’s Literature: Early Modern Women Writers (4 CR)

Early modern women writers engaged in a dangerous craft-dangerous because the very act of writing for an audience (however small) could endanger one’s reputation. Yet, as the work of twentieth century feminist critics has shown, there were a good number of women writing in English before 1800 (published and unpublished alike). In this class we will read a sampling of these women writers with special attention to how they responded to, shaped, and thought about the political, historical, and social moment in which they lived. We will be interested in not only uncovering these writers’ milieus, but also in engaging with the interdisciplinary study of early English women writers since the late twentieth century.

ENG L678 Literature and Medicine (4 CR)

This course focuses on literary study of medical themes, including works about contagion, the sick or altered body, or the cultural meanings of disease; of medical authorship by practitioners or patients; and of narrative approaches to illness, with emphasis on life writing, poetry, drama, and fiction.

ENG L680 Special Topics in Literary Study and Theory (4 CR)

This variable-title course number is used to offer various courses that are newly developed or do not fit easily within the categories listed above, including single-author courses and readings in sociological, political, psychological, or other approaches to literature.  May be repeated for credit.

ENG L681 Genre Studies (4 CR)

A variable-title course, Genre Studies examines the specific characteristics of individual genres. May be repeated once for credit.

ENG L695 Individual Readings in English (1-4 CR)

This course enables individual students to work on a reading project that they initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of an English department faculty member. Credit hours depend on scope of project.  Students are allowed to enroll only after they have received approval of a formal project proposal by a faculty supervisor and the Director of Graduate Studies.


Graduate Writing Courses

ENG W500 Teaching Writing: Issues and Approaches (4 CR)

This course looks at one of the mainstays of teaching writing-the process of writing-and the issues that arise in writing classrooms as well as the approaches that have been used to resolve such issues. As with W509 and W590, the course examines the theories that converged to produce process pedagogy, but the emphasis of the course is on the practical aspect of teaching writing. These practical aspects include structuring class time, organizing peer groups, constructing writing assignments, the teaching of grammar, evaluation and grading, and language differences. Thus, the course looks beyond the application of theory (W590) to the more practical concerns of implementing theory-based ideas systematically and effectively.

ENG W509 Introduction to Writing and Literacy Studies (4 CR)

This course is one of the gateway courses in the English M.A. and is the required core course for the Certificate in Teaching Writing. It focuses on the concerns of scholars in rhetoric and composition, and literacy studies more broadly. It serves as an introduction to what these scholars write, and to how they use various methods to investigate important research questions associated with writing and literacy practices.  In the process, it prepares students to be critical readers of academic writing and introduces them to possible directions for research.

ENG W510 Computers in Composition (4 CR)

This course explores the technological theories that shape writing instruction at the secondary and post-secondary level. Students will read theory-centric texts and compose critical responses. These writings will culminate in a semester project of no fewer than 15 pages. In addition, students are asked to engage with a range of digital composing software including: image editors, page layout programs online content management systems, and web authoring software. The purpose of this work is to encourage students to reexamine their assumptions about teaching and technology. Ideally, students will leave W510 able to intervene into the use of digital software in educational settings.

ENG W525 Research Approaches for Technical and Professional Writing (4 CR)  

Professional communicators need to know how to learn quickly and well.  In this course, students focus on how to learn about content, how to learn about audiences in their situations, and how to learn about document design in order to produce high quality publications. Working as teams, students read about and practice varying approaches to learning.  We look at approaches that help us understand both the breadth and depth of the research topics that professional and technical communicators need to master in workplace settings. 

ENG W531 Designing and Editing Visual Technical Communication (4 CR) 

In this course, students learn principles of designing publications that communicate both visually and verbally, learn to create and edit paper and electronic publications for clients’ contexts, develop project management skills, and enhance group collaborative writing skills. This course counts toward the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing.

ENG W532 Managing Document Quality (4 CR) 

Effective technical and professional publications require thoughtful planning and oversight by people familiar with factors that make a publication effective.  In this course, students examine and apply principles of creating technical or professional publications from start to finish.  Collaborating in groups, they explore and practice publication quality management issues such as planning, researching audience and content, designing the publication, drafting, managing content, obtaining reviews, conducting usability testing, editing drafts, and negotiating within organizational cultures.

ENG W590 Teaching Writing: Theories and Applications (4 CR)

Drawing on current scholarship and relevant statements from the rhetorical tradition, W590 examines theoretical assumptions in the design of classroom practices. The course focuses on knowing what we teach-and why-when we say that we teach writing. It also investigates how theories of reading, language, and technology apply to composition; how processes are central to written composition and teaching it; and how learning to write involves social and individual activities. Students respond to the assigned readings and analyze writing experiences taken from a variety of contexts, culminating in an independent project on a specific issue.

ENG W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Qualitative Research in Literacy (4 CR)

This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of conducting qualitative research on writing and reading. Students will spend the majority of the semester designing and conducting a research project on the literacy practices of a local group of readers/writers. Such a project is demanding and requires students to be self-directed. This work will be rewarded with experiences and data that will directly apply to each student’s research and teaching goals. Students will: 1) construct a solid theoretical understanding of qualitative research methods; 2) gain practical experience conducting research; and 3) further their research and teaching agendas.

ENG W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Basic Writing Pedagogy (4 CR)

This course examines the history, theory, and practice of basic writing in the United States. Rather than adhere to a single definition of basic writing, W600 asks students to analyze how scholars and institutions construct "basic writing" and "basic writers" within particular social and historical frames. Through these analyses, students will develop strategies for approaching the problematic of basic writing in their current and future work as instructors. This course prepares students to develop more nuanced understandings of basic writing theory and more sophisticated approaches to basic writing instruction.

ENG W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities (4 CR)

In the culture or institution of literacy, one dialect or language variety is sanctified as proper for writing-the so-called "grapholect," or Edited Written English. However, we are seeing more and more significant publication (fiction and nonfiction) in dialects of English previously considered oral (e.g., by Alice Walker, Gloria Anzaldua, Geneva Smitherman). In this course, we will consider the language variety or dialect called "correct" or "standard written English," its meaning, history, and politics. We will view this dialect against the backdrop of a multicultural, multilingual nation drawing on the English language as a means of articulating other identities and realities besides those expressed by mainstream writers. In addition to examining home and community language varieties from a sociolinguistic perspective, we will look at policies such as "Students’ Right to Their Own Language" and recent approaches to language learning such as code-shifting and code-meshing, as well as the influence of global Englishes (non-U.S. English varieties).

ENG W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Teaching Technical and Professional Writing (4 CR) 

In this course, students develop a deeper understanding of the theory that undergirds the teaching of technical/professional writing, design a technical/professional writing course and its activities, and learn to respond thoughtfully to and assess student work.  The course addresses secondary and post-secondary teaching situations and counts toward the graduate Teaching Writing Certificate. 

ENG W605 Writing Project Summer Institute (3-6 CR)

The Summer Institute invites teachers from K-university to consider major issues involved in the teaching of writing and explore the pedagogical approaches inherent in these issues.  The institute follows the National Writing Project philosophy, which insists on the primacy of teacher knowledge, expertise, and leadership, and believes that teachers of writing must be writers themselves. Thus, two important strands in the Summer Institute are (1) teachers demonstrating effective instructional practices and discussing writing pedagogy, and (2) individual writing fellows working on writing and research projects that they initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of the HWP co-directors. 

ENG W609 Individual Writing Projects (1-4 CR)

This course allows interested students to embark on a semester-long individual writing project.  Students are responsible for developing a proposal for the project and are allowed to enroll only after their proposal has been approved by a faculty supervisor and the Director of Graduate Studies.

ENG W697 Independent Study in Writing: Writing Project Advanced Institute (1-3 CR)

This course is by application and invitation only. Teachers K-university explore current theories of writing and their application in the classroom.  Preference is given to active classroom teachers.


Graduate Creative Writing Courses

ENG W508 Creative Writing for Teachers (4 CR)

Giving students a deeper understanding of the creative process and teaching them to think and talk about writing as writers do, this course offers strategies for critiquing creative work and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum suited to their classroom needs. The class emphasizes hands-on writing activities in poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction that are easily adaptable for use with student writing at every level. Most exercises and writing techniques are also useful in teaching expository writing and fulfill state requirements. This is a course that stresses the development of a process over the production of finished works.

ENG W511 Graduate Fiction Writing (4 CR)

This is an advanced course in the theory and practice of fiction writing that includes analysis of classic and contemporary models in the genre, seminar study of elements of narrative craft, and workshop discussion of student work-in-progress. The emphasis of the course will be revision, and students should expect to produce multiple drafts of all work presented to the workshop, both stories and critiques.

ENG W513 Graduate Poetry Writing (4 CR)

This course offers graduate students an intensive experience in reading and writing poetry.  Part workshop and part seminar in poetic practice and technique, W513 provides an opportunity for graduate students to expand their poetic range and hone their craft.

ENG W615 Graduate Creative Nonfiction Writing (4 CR)

This is an advanced course in the theory and practice of creative nonfiction writing with an emphasis on the personal or familiar essay.  Students will read a collection of important statements about the art and craft of essay writing as well as some classic and contemporary examples of the genre. Students will also produce and be graded on a significant body of work in the genre as well as a series of reading responses and regular written critiques of peer work-in-progress.

 

Associate Faculty Coalition

                                                                                                                                                       

We open doors. And we keep the doors open.                         Join the AFC!

 

In the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and some of the other schools on campus, part-time faculty who are paid by the course and teach on a semester-by-semester basis are called Associate Faculty. The Writing Program depends on associate faculty, who bring disciplinary knowledge, teaching experience, and professional expertise. 

 

Writing Program associate faculty have been instrumental in forming and building the Associate Faculty Coalition, whose mission is to gain visibility and respect and to improve working conditions for associate faculty at IUPUI. The Coalition formed in the fall 2009 semester (as the Associate Faculty Advisory Board) to help and represent associate faculty in the School of Liberal Arts. We expanded in fall 2010 to help part-time faculty across campus. We are composed of several part-time faculty as voting board members, full-time faculty allies, part-time and full-time faculty liaisons for various departments and schools, plus others who join as members.

 

Associate faculty are encouraged to join the Coalition. The Writing Coordinating Committee assures its associate faculty that we support their involvement in this Coalition, and that their involvement will in no way jeopardize their teaching assignments with the program. In fact, the Director of Writing is an advisor to the Coalition. 

  

 

What do we do?

The AFC’s goal is to improve working conditions and the culture surrounding part-time faculty at IUPUI. Our initiatives relate to pay, benefits, office space, professional development, communication, faculty governance, and more. These are major issues; resolving them and improving the culture will take time and a loud and collective voice. Only with large numbers of members will that voice be heard.

 

 

Whom do we represent?

The Coalition represents "part-time" faculty at IUPUI. We realize the designation of "part-time" is confusing because IUPUI uses several different titles for us. In the School of Liberal Arts, part-time faculty are called Associate Faculty. We are paid by the course, get our course assignments on a semester-by-semester basis, and receive no benefits. Your situation and title may be different, and while we have extracted a lot of data about our numbers and have a list of about 900 "part-time" faculty, we need your help in identifying all of us.

 

Membership is open to all faculty, staff, and students who believe in the Coalition’s mission of achieving equity for part-time faculty at IUPUI. You may join and do no more than add your name to show your support. Or you may get more involved by becoming a board member, serving on a committee, or participating in one of our planned initiatives this year. Membership information is not shared with anyone outside of the Coalition.

 

More information about the Coalition can be found here. To join, download a membership form and return it to a member of the Coalition.

 

Although many people believe that solidarity and group action are the best routes to improved working conditions for all faculty, individual faculty are welcome to discuss their concerns with their program Director, department Chair, school Dean, or any other campus administrator or office. The Coalition makes itself available to part-time faculty who wish to address working condition issues with an administrator by accompanying the part-time faculty to meetings where issues are discussed. While we acknowledge we lack authority to ensure the part-time faculty’s issue is resolved equitably, our support will present a stronger front to administrators and can make it easier to bring issues to their attention.

 

 

What has the Associate Faculty Coalition done?

Since we launched as a group within the School of Liberal Arts, most of our initiatives to date have been focused there. Now that we’ve expanded to include all part-time faculty at IUPUI, we plan to work on related issues and conduct similar awareness-raising campaigns across campus. Please use the list below as a guide to what we would like to do for associate faculty across campus. We realize part-time faculty in other schools on campus will have different issues and we’d like to know what they are.

 

 

Where else can Associate Faculty access resources?

The Center for Teaching and Learning provides additional support to associate faculty, primarily by providing professional development workshops and consulting.

 

Drama

Drama

Drama is alive and well in Indianapolis!

Our multivalent city offers theatre-goers a wealth of options every day of the week, from the full-length professional fare of the Indianapolis Repertory and Dance Kaleidoscope to the "best of contemporary theatre" in Indianapolis at the Phoenix, to the shorter works of the annual IndyFringe Festival, and to a dynamic new company of young talent—combining IUPUI students and Indianapolis actors, Hoosier Bard Productions. Throughout the year, the city is flush with amateur and professional productions of the plays of Shakespeare, Chekhov, Williams, and Beckett, as well as the premieres of works of local playwrights.

A new state-of-the-art theater in the heart of the IUPUI campus center provides a venue for new Department of English course offerings in Drama—a development that puts students, faculty, and citizens right in the middle of this vibrant theatre community.



The New Oxford Shakespeare Project

The New Oxford Shakespeare Project at IUPUI is editing an edition of Shakespeare for the next generation. As editors, performance plays a central role in our vision, so we have created Hoosier Bard Productions as the theatrical arm of the New Oxford Shakespeare Project. We are primarily concerned with staging the most problematic plays in the Shakespeare canon, but we are also reaching out to other playwrights in order to create, along with the IUPUI campus and wider Indianapolis community, an innovative, challenging theatre company that is willing to take risks. By embracing rarely-staged plays, Hoosier Bard uses live theatre to teach and to learn about the staging and writing methods of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. In February 2011, we staged Young Hamlet, a infrequently performed work based on the earliest printed text of Shakespeare’s most famous play. After five sold-out shows, the city buzzed with excitement about the differences—and the similarities—between this early play and the customary Hamlets of the later texts, demonstrating that Indianapolis audiences are eager to see familiar works of theatre in new and unexpected ways. Our theatrical work on Young Hamlet directly informs our editorial work on New Oxford Shakespeare, and Hoosier Bard is now in the process of discovering how it can continue to entertain and instruct Indianapolis audiences through performances of equally dynamic and challenging dramatic works.

 

Hoosier Bard Productions

Hoosier Bard Productions is linked to the student body of IUPUI in very significant ways: through the classroom, through the opportunity to work with trained international actors and top professors, and through the IUPUI Shakespeare Club. Hoosier Bard Shakespeare Club offers students on the IUPUI campus the chance to be cast in a Hoosier Bard Production as an actor, stage-hand, set designer or technician. The Club encourages internships with local theatre and performance organizations, and keeps students up-to-date with opportunities to see Shakespeare performed on campus and city stages in Bloomington, Notre Dame, and Chicago. Become a part of the IUPUI Shakespeare Club and join a group of students and faculty who are as excited about drama and Shakespeare as you are! We want and need your ideas, your creativity, your energy, and your comradeship in the sheer joy of experiencing—and challenging—the works of Shakespeare!  You can also "Like" the IUPUI Shakespeare Drama Club and join us on Facebook.

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TESOL—Career Resource Center

 

Resume Building / Job Resources / US EmploymentInternational Employment / Travel/Teach Aboard

 

The Career Resource Center (CRC) is an informational website sponsored by the English Department. CRC’s main purpose is to help TESOL students/graduates:

 

Resume Building

 

Resume Tips and Links

 


 

Job Resources

 

The following websites provide general info on job search and preparation strategies:

 

 

The following websites will help you with job seeking and/or understanding some of the things involved in working/living abroad:

 

 

US Employment

 

Education Job Posting Sites

 

 

General Job Search Sites

 

 

 

International Employment

 

 

Recommended Options (Reputable Operations)

 

Job Boards and Listserves (Check out opportunities carefully!)

 

Note:  IUPUI English does not endorse these websites over any other international job sites. We also recommend that you fully research any international job opportunities thoroughly before signing a contract or traveling to the country. Please see the websites on Job Seeker’s Resources and some of the suggestions provided on Teach Abroad Information.

 

 

Travel / Teach Abroad

 

Content Under Development

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TESOL—Student Resources


Housing / Enrollment / Internships

 

You should try to arrive in Indianapolis at least a few days prior to start of your classes. Below is information on the community and housing. IUPUI does not endorse any website or living options over another.

Housing

IUPUI Housing

IUPUI OneStart Classifieds

Log in to onestart.iu.edu, find the "Classifieds" section in the lower left side of the page, then click on "Roommates & Sublets". Here IUPUI students can post that they are looking for a roommate or sublease, or students can post that they are looking for an apartment to live in.

Apartments

 

Community Information

     




Enrollment Checklist

_____  Send English Department an admission acceptance letter

_____  Apply for Financial Aid

_____  Set up your OneStart Account

_____  Set up IU email account. Make sure you check this account, since important notices regarding financial aid/assistantships/registration may be delivered.

_____  Authorize financial aid through OneStart

_____  Select and enroll in your first semester courses. Click here to research availability and meeting times of your selected courses.

_____  Apply for/Research housing options

_____  Pay Tuition Fees

_____  Purchase required course textbooks

_____  Explore IUPUI organizations and events on the IUPUI website

 


 

Internship Opportunities

See also the English Department Internship Page

 

 

 

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TESOL Certificate Program—Financial Information


Certificate Home / Requirements / Admission / Financial


Tuition & Fees

For all information related to tuition and fee payment processes, visit the Bursar webpage.

 


Estimation for Financial Aid Purposes

To know the estimated cost of attendance whether you are a Resident or Non-Resident/International Student, click here.

 


Student Financial Aid

Applying for and receiving financial aid involves a few steps. Here is a general outline of what you need to do:

1.  Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

2.  Federal Aid:

3.  IUPUI Scholarships

4.  Private Sector Scholarships.  You may browse a list of available private-sector scholarships on:

 

IMPORTANT: For current financial aid info or any additional steps you may need to take to obtain your financial aid, you should:

- Login to OneStart
- Go to Student Center
- Under Finances, click on View Financial Aid and Accept/Decline Awards to take appropriate action


For more information on financial aid notification and accepting/declining awards, click here.

For a comprehensive description on applying for financial aid at IUPUI, click here.

Click here to access the IUPUI Financial Aid website.

 

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TESOL Certificate Program Admission


Certificate Home / RequirementsAdmission / Financial 

Admission Requirements:

Submit the following:

 

Transcripts (or any materials besides payment not submitted electronically) should be sent to:
IUPUI English Department
425 University Blvd.
Cavanaugh Hall 502L
Indianapolis, IN 46202

 

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TESOL Certificate Program Requirements


Certificate Home / Requirements / Admission / Financial

 

Course Requirements

The TESOL Certificate Program is a 21-credit program that can be completed in 1 academic year.

Required Courses - 17 Credits
ENG G500 4 cr.  Introduction to the English Language
LING L532 3 cr.  Second Language Acquisition
LING L534 3 cr.  Principles and Practices of Language Teaching
ENG G541 4 cr.  Materials Preparation for ESL
LING L535 3 cr.  Teaching Practicum 

Elective Courses - 4 Credits
ENG G625 4 cr.  Introduction to Text Linguistics/Discourse Analysis
ENG G652 4 cr.  English Language Sociolinguistics
LING T600 3 cr.  Topics in TESOL and Applied Linguistics - English for Specific Purposes
LING T660 3 cr.  Contrastive Discourse
ENG L695 1-4 cr.  Individual Readings in English
LING T690 1-4 cr.  Advanced Readings in TESOL and Applied Linguistics
ENG L590 4 cr.  Internship in English (may be done twice)

 

Other graduate-level courses may also be taken, according to individual interest. For additional courses, please see the IUPUI Bulletin.


 

 

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TESOL Certificate Program


Certificate Home / Requirements / Admission / Financial
 

The English Department offers the TESOL Certificate Program for students who have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and who would like to be trained in teaching English to non-native speakers of English.  The 21-credit hour graduate program prepares teachers to meet the needs of adult learners of English in an increasingly globalized world.  The TESOL Certificate can be completed in one calendar year; all certificate credits can be applied to the MA in English with a TESOL emphasis.

 

Student Consumer Information About this Program

 

 

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TESOL—Financial


Program Home / Program Requirements / Courses / Admission / Financial 

Tuition & Fees

For all information related to tuition and fee payment processes, visit the Bursar webpage.

 

Estimation for Financial Aid Purposes

To know the estimated cost of attendance whether you are a Resident or Non-Resident/International Student, click here.

 

Student Financial Aid

Applying for and receiving financial aid involves a few steps. Here is a general outline of what you need to do:

1.  Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

2.  Federal Aid:

3.  IUPUI Scholarships

4.  Private Sector Scholarships.  You may browse a list of available private-sector scholarships on:

 

IMPORTANT: For current financial aid info or any additional steps you may need to take to obtain your financial aid, you should:

- Login to OneStart
- Go to Student Center
- Under Finances, click on View Financial Aid and Accept/Decline Awards to take appropriate action


For more information on financial aid notification and accepting/declining awards, click here.

For a comprehensive description on applying for financial aid at IUPUI, click here.

Click here to access the IUPUI Financial Aid website.

 

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TESOL Admissions


Program Home / Program Requirements / Courses / Admission / Financial


Admission Requirements

Admission requirements are the same as the admission requirements to the MA in English:

• Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university,
• Minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale)
• Applicants are expected to have been English majors, but admission also is considered for those who otherwise demonstrate the competency necessary for successful graduate work in English.
• Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test (which should be taken by December of the year before admission). At least:

• 600 in either verbal or quantitative section
• 4.0 in analytical writing section

Application Requirements

Please apply for the MA and Certificate at the same time.  Submit the following:

 

Transcripts (or any materials not submitted electronically) should be sent to:


IUPUI English Department
425 University Blvd.
Cavanaugh Hall 502L
Indianapolis, IN 46202

 

Application deadlines:

 

 

Visa Requirements for International students

 

 

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TESOL Faculty Resources


Online Journals / Book List / Lesson Plans / Online Discussions / Conferences / Electronic Citation / Publishing

 

Online Journals and Meta-sites

 


Metasites

 


Sites for Teaching/Learning


Book Resource List

The following is a list of links to primary publishers in the field of English as a Second Language

 


Lesson Plans


Online Discussions

The following is a list of links to online discussion forums in the field of TESOL:

 


Conferences

 


Electronic Citation Resources

 


Publishing Resources

The following websites are publishing companies that publish books and/or a listing of journals that publish articles related to ESL education:


From this website, you can click on any journal and investigate its publishing procedures.  New pages will open in new windows.

 

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TESOL—Other Campus Resources

 

 

 

 

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TESOL Courses


Program Home / Program Requirements / Courses / Admission / Financial 

 

TESOL Concentration Courses—Required

ENG G500

Introduction to the English Language Lays foundation for study of English linguistics. Covers the principal areas of linguistic inquiry into the English language: sounds (phonetics and phonology), words, (morphology), sentences (syntax), and meaning (semantics).

LING L532

Second Language Acquisition Covers a broad range of issues in the field of second-language acquisition, including how people learn a second language and understanding how theoretical approaches connect to student language expression and practical application for teaching.

LING L534

Principles and Practices of Language Teaching Examines recent theories of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students will examine methods and develop knowledge of linguistic resources available to new and/or practicing teachers.

LING L535

Teaching Practicum Put into practice methods and principles of linguistics, second-language acquisition, and language teaching. Under supervision, you will teach ESL classes either at IUPUI or in a local school system.

ENG G541

Materials Preparation for ESL Studies materials preparation, syllabus design, and test preparation by applying a variety of theories to books and other teaching devices (e.g., tapes, videotapes, computer and software programs) in order to evaluate their usefulness. Learn how to evaluate ESL materials for adequacy.

 L699

MA Thesis Work on your thesis

 


TESOL Electives  

ENG L590

Internship in English (may be done twice) A supervised internship in the uses of language in the workplace. (For prospective teachers, the workplace may be a class.) Each intern will be assigned a problem or new task and will develop the methods for solving the problem or completing the task. Interns will complete a portfolio of workplace writing and self-evaluation; they will also be visited by a faculty coordinator and evaluated in writing by their on-site supervisors.

LING T600

Topics in TESOL and Applied Linguistics - English for Specific Purposes Topics in this course vary, but they include the theory and teaching of English for Specific Purposes in academic, professional, or vocational fields.

ENG G625

Introduction to Text Linguistics/Discourse Analysis Introduces students to current approaches to text and discourse coherence, including recent theories of cognitive and interactional text modeling.

ENG G652

English Language Sociolinguistics Investigates socio-cultural aspects of language use and explores the relationships between language and society. Provides a background in various theoretical and methodological approaches to sociolinguistics. Other topics include: gender and language, ethnicity and language, social factors in language acquisition, and bilingualism. Should be familiar with basic issues and concepts in linguistics.

LING T660

Contrastive Discourse Examines contrastive discourse/intercultural rhetoric and considers the cross-cultural aspects of discourse organization from both the reader’s and the writer’s viewpoints. Comparisons of text organization in different genres and for different audiences will be made, studying the roles of cultural forms and schemata in the interaction between writer and reader. 

LING T690

Advanced Readings in TESOL and Applied Linguistics Topics in this course vary, but they include the theory and teaching of English for Specific Purposes in academic, professional, or vocational fields; the teaching of second-language writing, reading, listening/speaking, and grammar; and second-language testing and assessment.

ENG L695

Individual Readings in English Enables students to work on a reading project that they initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of an English department faculty member. Credit hours depend on scope of project.


Other graduate-level courses may also be taken, according to individual interest and with advisor approval.  For additional courses, please see the IUPUI Bulletin.


 

 

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Faculty Resources


Teaching Resources / Professional Organizations / Conferences / Journals

 

 

Resources for IUPUI faculty teaching non-native English speakers:
 

 

 


Resources for EAP Faculty

 

Professional Organizations


Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Incorporated in 1966, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. (TESOL), is a global association for English language teaching professionals headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia, USA. TESOL encompasses a network of approximately 60,000 educators worldwide, consisting of more than 14,000 individual members and an additional 45,000 educators within the 100 plus TESOL affiliate associations. Representing a multifaceted academic discipline and profession, TESOL offers members serial publications, books, and electronic resources on current issues, ideas, and opportunities in the field of English language teaching. TESOL also conducts a variety of workshops and symposia, including an annual convention, regarded as the foremost professional development opportunity for English language educators worldwide. TESOL’s mission is to develop and maintain professional expertise in English language teaching and learning for speakers of other languages worldwide.

American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL)
The American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL), the United States affiliate of the International Association of Applied Linguistics (AILA), is a professional organization whose members engage in research and practice in applied language issues.

Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO)
CALICO, the Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium is a professional organization that serves a membership involved in both education and technology. CALICO has an emphasis on language teaching and learning but reaches out to all areas that employ the languages of the world to instruct and to learn. CALICO is a recognized international clearinghouse and leader in computer assisted learning and instruction. It is a premier global association dedicated to computer-assisted language learning (CALL).

CALICO began mainly as a group of people interested in using and producing technology-based materials for language teaching. After 25 years of growth and experience, CALICO now includes foreign language educators, programmers, technicians, web page designers, CALL developers, CALL practitioners, novice CALL users, second language acquisition researchers—anyone interested in exploring the use of technology for foreign language teaching and learning.



Conferences


Symposium on Second Language Writing (SSLW)
The Symposium on Second Language Writing (SSLW) is an annual international conference that brings together teachers and researchers who work with second- and foreign-language writers to discuss important issues in the field of second language writing.

The SSLW began in 1998 at Purdue University as a way of facilitating the advancement of knowledge in the field of L2 writing and to build a sense of community among those who are involved in L2 writing research and instruction.

 


Journals


TESOL Quarterly
TESOL Quarterly, a professional, refereed journal, was first published in 1967. The Quarterly encourages submission of previously unpublished articles on topics of signi´Čücance to individuals concerned with English language teaching and learning and standard English as a second dialect. As a publication that represents a variety of cross-disciplinary interests, both theoretical and practical, the Quarterly invites manuscripts on a wide range of topics, especially in the following areas:

The Journal of English for Academic Purposes
The Journal of English for Academic Purposes provides a forum for the dissemination of information and views which enables practitioners of and researchers in EAP to keep current with developments in their field and to contribute to its continued updating. JEAP publishes articles, book reviews, conference reports, and academic exchanges in the linguistic, sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic description of English as it occurs in the contexts of academic study and scholarly exchange itself. A wide range of linguistic, applied linguistic and educational topics may be treated from the perspective of English for academic purposes; these include: classroom language, teaching methodology, teacher education, assessment of language, needs analysis; materials development and evaluation, discourse analysis, acquisition studies in EAP contexts, research writing and speaking at all academic levels, the sociopolitics of English in academic uses and language planning.

ESP
English For Specific Purposes is an international peer-reviewed journal that welcomes submissions from across the world. Authors are encouraged to submit articles and research/discussion notes on topics relevant to the teaching and learning of discourse for specific communities: academic, occupational, or otherwise specialized. Topics such as the following may be treated from the perspective of English for specific purposes: second language acquisition in specialized contexts, needs assessment, curriculum development and evaluation, materials preparation, discourse analysis, descriptions of specialized varieties of English, teaching and testing techniques, the effectiveness of various approaches to language learning and language teaching, and the training or retraining of teachers for the teaching of ESP. In addition, the journal welcomes articles and discussions that identify aspects of ESP needing development, areas into which the practice of ESP may be expanded, possible means of cooperation between ESP programs and learners’ professional or vocational interests, and implications that findings from related disciplines can have for the profession of ESP. The journal also carries reviews of scholarly books on topics of interest to the profession.

ELTJ
ELT Journal is a quarterly publication for all those involved in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language. The journal links the everyday concerns of practitioners with insights gained from related academic disciplines such as applied linguistics, education, psychology, and sociology.  The journal provides a medium for informed discussion of the principles and practice which determine the ways in which the English language is taught and learnt around the world. It is also a forum for the exchange of information among members of the profession worldwide.

Journal of Applied Linguistics
The Journal of Applied Linguistics was launched in 2004 with the aim of advancing research and practice in Applied Linguistics as a principled and interdisciplinary endeavour. The journal seeks material that highlights the evidence in establishing claims of relevance to practice in Applied Linguistics research and has a special concern for research methodology through a focus on research tools, cross-disciplinary contributions, issues of ethics and research participation. This focus underscores the point that methodological issues within Applied Linguistics need a different kind of airing to the ways these are discussed in cognate disciplines such as sociology, education, psychology. Language-specific methodological debates around case studies, and the call for a mixing of methodologies within Applied Linguistics more generally will serve a long-awaited need for younger scholars engaged in postgraduate and in funded research.

 

 

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Master’s in English—Program Requirements

Grades

M.A. students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B).
 

Course Requirements

The M.A. in English with a TESOL concentration requires 36 credit hours, including:

M.A. in English Core Courses - 8 Credits

The three core courses provide an introduction to three major areas in the discipline of English. TESOL Students are required to take G500 and one of the other two core courses, preferably at the beginning of the graduate program:

Area

Course Number

Credits

Course Name

LanguageENG G5004Introduction to the English Language (Required)
WritingENG W5094Introduction to Writing and Literacy Studies
LiteratureENG L5064Introduction to Methods of Criticism and Research

 

TESOL Concentration Core Courses - 13 Credits

Course Number

 Credits

 Course Name

LING L532  3 Second Language Acquisition
LING L534 3 Principles and Practices of Language Teaching
ENG G541  4 Materials Preparation for ESL
LING L535 3 Teaching Practicum

 

Thesis Work - 4 Credits

Course Number

 Credits

 Course Name

ENG L699 4 MA Thesis

  

Elective/Area Courses - 10 Credits

Typical TESOL Elective Courses

Course Number

 Credits

 Course Name

ENG G625 4 Introduction to Text Linguistics/Discourse Analysis
ENG G652 4 English Language Sociolinguistics
LING T600 3 Topics in TESOL and Applied Linguistics—English for Specific Purposes
LING T660 3 Contrastive Discourse
ENG L695 1-4 Individual Readings in English
LING T690 1-4 Advanced Readings in TESOL and Applied Linguistics
ENG L590 4 Internship in English (may be done twice)
   

Other graduate-level courses may also be taken, according to individual interest and with advisor approval. For additional courses, please see the IUPUI Bulletin.

 

Programs Home / Programs Requirements / Courses / Admission / Financial / Thesis Requirements
 

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Master’s in English with TESOL Concentration

Program Home / Program Requirements / Courses / Admission / Financial

 

The English Department Graduate Program offers a Master of Arts Degree with a concentration in TESOL. Students pursue the MA in English by combining the course work for the TESOL Certificate with additional courses to meet the requirements of the MA in English. Students who complete the MA in English with a TESOL concentration will be qualified to teach in most post-secondary and adult programs in the US and in the international community.

Note:  The School of Education offers several programs in teaching English as a New Language for certification and endorsements on an Indiana Teaching License or for the teaching of children. For complete information as to their programs access the School of Education web site.

 

Handling Issues of Plagiarism


Overview / Steps in Handling Plagiarism / Plagiarism Resource Sites / Possible Sanctions and Options

 

Overview

It is important to remember that a fundamental goal of a writing course is to improve students’ abilities to work with sources; there should be no threat of harsh penalties for misusing sources when our courses are designed, in part, to teach students how to use sources well. At the same time, issues of fraud should always and immediately draw a clear penalty. For these reasons, this guide separates cheating, or fraud, from issues of plagiarism.

Cheating or Fraud. Students are cheating when they turn in work written by someone else—work that was bought, borrowed, stolen, or downloaded from the Internet—and pass it off as their own work.

Penalties for this form of plagiarism may range from a lowered grade on an assignment or a portfolio, to an F for the assignment, portfolio, or course, or, in extreme cases, expulsion from IUPUI.

Failing to Cite Sources. If a student has written an essay that includes passages, specific information, or striking language from another source, and fails to include appropriate documentation, she is violating academic expectations. Information that is summarized, paraphrased, or quoted from others’ work (including electronic texts, websites, classmates’ work, lectures, interviews, or written sources) should be correctly attributed.

Faculty may refer students to the University Writing Center to work with citing sources, or they can suggest that students review their text on their own. After faculty have provided instruction and individual feedback to a student about source use, and later drafts still fail to cite sources, the matter should be handled in context as the assignment or portfolio grade is calculated. Depending on the extent of the problem, the assignment or portfolio grade may be lowered (just as failure to perform in some other key area of the course would lower a grade). In cases of extreme failure to cite sources, the assignment or portfolio may be judged failing. Note that a student who fails to cite sources in a deliberate attempt to conceal the source should be considered to be cheating.

Close-but-not-quite-quotations from sources. Many students will not be able to distinguish an inaccurate from accurate citation, particularly when there is some attempt to acknowledge the source. Spending time in class reviewing and practicing how to appropriately credit summaries and paraphrases will help students think through how to integrate and synthesize written sources. This is a complex task and students should be expected to make mistakes as they learn it.

As with the penalties for non-attribution of sources, the penalties for poor summarizing and paraphrasing vary depending on the context, and the extent of the problem. If such problems occur in an early draft, faculty should provide more instruction. However, if such problems persist in final drafts that are submitted in portfolios, the portfolio grade may be lowered appropriately.

 


 

Steps in Handling Plagiarism

If faculty suspect that a student is cheating (that is, turning in work written by someone else, or failing to cite sources in a deliberate attempt to deceive a teacher) they should consult the course coordinator or member of the Writing Coordinating Committee to ensure that procedures are correctly followed. Faculty should also review The Indiana University Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities to become familiar with official procedures before talking to the student. The Code sets guidelines and recommendations of handling student misconduct:

Faculty should use this form at the conclusion of the informal conference to document compliance with the student Code. Instructors must report the matter within seven calendar days in writing to the Dean of Students, who will send the report to the student, the dean or director of the school or unit in which the offense occurred, and the student’s dean or director.

 


 

Plagiarism Resource Sites

There are a number of sites that provide helpful information about plagiarism, how to spot it, and how to deal with it. Feel free to share these sites with your students.

 


 

Possible Sanctions and Options

Remember, even if the student claims it was unintentional, plagiarism may constitute academic misconduct. It also is important to remember there are options for imposing sanctions. Below is an example of an option an instructor worked out with a student, and communicated in writing, after the student plagiarized by cutting and pasting large chunks of text from various websites. The student had a Works Cited page, but used no in-text citations or quotation marks, probably because she knew the paper was not supposed to be a cut and paste.

In order to have a passing portfolio, you are required to do the following:

These requirements, which conform to the Indiana University Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities, are due no later than _________________.

If you are unfamiliar with the expectations for citing sources, please visit this link: Plagiarism: What It is and How to Recognize and Avoid It. You may wish to read some writing handbooks as well, and to visit the University Writing Center for help.

English Department Past Master’s Theses

 

Area of Study Thesis Title Author Thesis Committee Date
Applied Linguistics/TESOL Making the Case for Degree Credit EAP Courses Lakey, Sonya Upton, Thomas A.  (Chair)
Harrington, Susanmarie
Beck, M. Catherine
2009-11-4
Applied Linguistics/TESOL The Adjunct Model of Language Instruction: Guidelines for Implementation in the English for Academic Purposes Program at IUPUI Kinsey, Marienne Elizabeth Upton, Thomas A.  (Chair)
Duerksen, Aye Nu E.
Belz, Julie A.
2009-10-10
Literature Navigating through "a nightmare of meaninglessness without end": a semi-structural reading of Kurt Vonnegut’s The Sirens of Titan Cook, Joshua Eller, Jonathan R.  (Chair)
Rudy, John
Marvin, Thomas
2009-06-23
Applied Linguistics/TESOL Black, Brown, Yellow, and White: The New Faces of African American English Vanegas, José Alfonso Shepherd, Susan (Chair)
Upton, Thomas A.
Fox, Steve
2009-03-18
Literature Double Visions—Separating Gordon Lish’s Edits from Raymond Carver’s Original Authorship in Three Stories Powers, Michael A. Rebein, Robert (Chair)
Eller, Jonathan R.
Touponce, William F.
2009-03-18
Creative Writing Sharing Control: Emancipatory Authority in the Poetry Writing Classroom Bell, Robert N. Rebein, Robert (Chair)
Harrington, Susanmarie
Kovacik, Karen
2009-03-18
Literature A Window to Jim’s Humanity: The Dialectic Between Huck and Jim in Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Anderson, Erich R. Schultz, Jane E.  (Chair)
Eller, Jonathan R.
Rebein, Robert
2009-01-16
Applied Linguistics/TESOL An ESP Reading Course: Methods and Materials Kiefer, Marvin R. Connor, Ulla, Chair
Duerksen, Aye Nu E.
Orlando, Honnor
2008-10-13
Applied Linguistics/TESOL Grant Proposal Writing: A Case Study of an International Postdoctoral Researcher Strickland, Clyde William Connor, Ulla (Chair)
Rozycki, William V.
Upton, Thomas A.
2008-10-09
Literature At the Center of American Modernism: Lola Ridge’s Politics, Poetics, and Publishing Wheeler, Belinda Kovacik, Karen (Chair)
Schultz, Jane E.
Marvin, Thomas F.
2008-08-23
Writing and Literacy The Teenage Dialect Telley, Sarah Ann Lovejoy, Kim Brian (Chair)
Weeden, Scott R.
Harrington, Susanmarie
2008-07-07
Literature Mangled Bodies, Mangled Selves: Hurston, A. Walker and Morrison Raab, Angela R. Kubitscheck, Missy D.  (Chair)
Springer, Jennifer T.
Marvin, Tom
2008-06-16
Applied Linguistics/TESOL English for Academic Public Speaking LeBeau, Stephen Allen, Jr. Upton, Thomas A.
Goering, Elizabeth,
Davis, Kenneth W.
2008-04-16
Literature Sara’s Transformation: A Textual Analysis of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s Sara Crewe and A Little Princess Resler, Johanna Elizabeth Eller, Jonathan R.
(Chair)
Touponce, William F.
Wokeck, Marianne S.
2008-04-15
Literature Last Word in Art Shades: The Textual State of James Joyce’s Ulysses Tully-Needler, Kelly Lynn Davis, Kenneth W.  (Chair)
Eller, Jonathan R.
Touponce, William F.
2008-03-06
Applied Linguistics/TESOL Dear Birthmother: A Linguistic Analysis of Letters Written to Expectant Mothers Considering Adoption Cohen, Mary Ann D. Harrington, Susanmarie (Chair)
Upton, Thomas A.
Shepherd, Susan
2007-07-20
Writing and Literacy Logging in, Blogging "Out": Gay College Age Males and the Blogosphere Williams, Alan Neal Harrington, Susanmarie (Chair)
Lovejoy, Kim Brian
Dobris, Catherine A.
2007-07-10
Applied Linguistics/TESOL A Model for Developing Law Lecture Comprehension Lessons for Non-Native Speakers of English from Video-taped Authentic Materials Martin, Lynne Rohmerien Upton, Thomas A.  (Chair)
Connor, Ulla
Beck, M. Catherine
2007-06-26
Literature Stranger in the Room: Illuminating Female Identity Through Irish Drama Johnson, Amy R. Eller, Jonathan R.

2007-05-23
Literature Frank Miller’s Ideals of Heroism Jones, Stephen Matthew Bingham, Dennis (Chair)
Touponce, William F.
Karnick, Kristine Brunovska
2007-05-18
Literature Unraveling Walt Whitman Cristo, George Constantine Eller, Jonathan R.  (Chair)
Schultz, Jane E.
Touponce, William F.
2007-05-18
Literature Wrapped Up in Books: The Inner Life of Newland Archer in The Age of Innocence Reeves, Nancee C. Schultz, Jane E.  (Chair)
Eller, Jonathan R.
Johnson, Karen R.

2007-04-19 

Mary Sauer retires after 30 years of teaching and service

 

Mary Sauer

The Writing program and the Department of English THANK MARY FOR 30 YEARS OF OUTSTANDING TEACHING AND SERVICE.  View a slideshow from her retirement celebration.

  

John Wieland is top Associate Faculty of the year

John WielandJohn A. Wieland, Associate Faculty, English, was named the Outstanding Distinguished Associate Faculty Member for 2010. John has been an Associate Faculty member at IUPUI since 1984.  In that time, he has proven himself to be a creative teacher who routinely receives enthusiastic evaluations from his students.  His nominating letters praise his willingness constantly to improve his teaching by attending workshops and seminars, and his active involvement with entering students in Learning Communities.  One nominator reported that John’s versatility is evident in his teaching-in areas ranging from composition to literature to business writing to golf and specialized continuing studies offerings.

"To each of these teaching situations," the letter continued, "John brings teaching and professional experience, extensive reading, and a keen eye for what helps students learn." For his outstanding teaching, the Faculty Affairs Committee has chosen John as the recipient of the 2009/2010 award.

  

Sarah Layden wins SBJ awards  

Sarah LaydenTwo articles written by Sarah Layden, Associate Faculty, English, won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Best in Indiana Journalism contest. The article, "Fighting to unionize" won first place for Social Justice Reporting. "A different kind of chance" won second place for Social Justice Reporting. Both articles ran in NUVO.

  

  

Joe Weaver, Associate Faculty, English, receives Distinguished Hoosier AwardJoe Weaver

Joe received The Distinguished Hoosier Award, which is given by the Office of the Governor, for his work, service, and leadership in education.


 

Joe’s background includes an impressive mix of positions and service that exemplifies his dedication to education:

  

  

  

Lylanne Musselman, Association Faculty, English, featured poet

Lylanne MusselmanIn January, Lylanne was the featured poet when The Writer’s Center of Indiana presented "An Evening with the Muse." Lylanne, who lives in Irvington, teaches writing at IUPUI, and creative writing at Ivy Tech Community College and the University of Indianapolis’ School of Adult Learning. She hosts Writers Speak Volumes! a poet and writers group that meets once a month at Bookmamas in Irvington. In addition, her autobiographical story feature, L Words, airs monthly on BloomingOUT, a weekly broadcast on WFHB radio.

 

An award winning poet, Lylanne’s poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Tipton Poetry Journal, PANK, Umbrella, Flying Island, New Verse News, Ichabod’s Sketchbook, Wilderness House Literary Review and many Outrider Press anthologies. Her chapbook, A Charm Bracelet for Cruising, was recently published by Winged City Press, an imprint of New Sins Press.

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Technology Resources for Teaching Writing


Technical Support / Free Software / Training / Reserving Computer Classrooms / Oncourse / Support for Teachers in Computer Classrooms / Computer Room Switch Schedule / Software in Computer Classrooms / Planning the Syllabus for Computer Room Classes / Student Orientation to the Computer Classroom

 

The Writing Program strongly supports writing teachers who wish to integrate technology into their pedagogy. Technology can increase interaction and collaboration, teach process steps, demonstrate revising and editing skills, and help students develop critical research skills.
 

Pedagogical Support


Technical Support  

Classroom Technology 

Classroom computers (and those in Cavanaugh lobbies) are maintained by Classroom Services through University Information Technology Services (UITS). Call Classroom Services at 274-8400 for help with projectors or other equipment. You may also call the Classroom Services consultant on duty at 274-0779.

The  Knowledge Base is a database of thousands of answers to questions about computing is available at Indiana University’s award-winning Knowledge Base. (http://kb.iu.edu/)

The UITS Support Center (http://uits.iu.edu/) addresses general questions or problems concerning technology. Their services and hours are as follows:


Office Technology

Liberal Arts Technical Services staff are available for faculty who need help with network connections or office computing:


Free Software

Free software can be downloaded from IUWare, (http://iuware.iu.edu/) such as Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2010, Photoshop Elements 8, and Creative Suite 5 Design Premium.


Training

University Integrated Technology Services (UITS) offers 3-hour classes for faculty and staff on Adobe, Excel, Dreamweaver, and many more. For more information, contact IT Training and Education at 274-7383 (http://ittraining.iu.edu/).


Reserving Computer Classrooms

Those instructors not teaching in a Cavanaugh Hall computer classroom who would like to reserve one  (on a one-time basis or for several class sessions) can complete the online form at https://db.liberalarts.iupui.edu/fms/

For availability of other computer classrooms (Student Technology Centers) on campus, such as BS 3003 and BS 3001, see "How can I reserve an STC for a class?" at http://kb.iu.edu/data/aezq.html.


Oncourse

Oncourse, IU’s online collaboration and learning environment, powered by Sakai, supports teaching and learning, committees, projects, research, and portfolios for Indiana University’s community of students, faculty, and staff.


Online Resources


Individual Support

The IUPUI Center for Teaching and Learning 317-274-1300 thectl@iupui.edu provides support for integrating Oncourse CL into teaching.


Support for Teachers in Computer Classrooms

The English Department was one of the first in the country to offer composition classes in computer classrooms (in 1985), based on the knowledge that computers are the most powerful writing tools available. Using technology invigorates the teaching of writing by supporting the writing process, enhancing collaboration, fostering deep revision, and enabling rapid instructor and peer response. "Activities for Teaching with Technology" is a link to the Writing Program website which provides examples of productive and creative uses of technology in writing classes (http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/english/index.php/academics/wtgp/wtgp_tech_bp).

Our assumptions about teaching with computers are as follows:

   
Computer Room Switch Schedule

Currently, all sections of W270 and W231, and several sections of W131, meet in computer classrooms, but we have only two computer rooms available, CA 323 and 425. To increase the number of sections offered in computer classrooms, we use a switch schedule for classes meeting twice a week. This means the class will meet in a computer classroom (CA 425 or CA 323) one day a week and in a traditional classroom (CA 349 or CA 347) one day a week.

Instructors should pay close attention to the teaching assignment memo from the Writing Program office because it includes the switch schedule (which begins the second week of the semester).

First week of the semester: All class meetings are held only in the room listed on the Registrar’s Schedule of Classes.

M/W and T/Th classes: The instructor’s teaching assignment memo will indicate which day the class meets in the computer room and which day it meets in a traditional classroom. It will also state the room the class will meet in during the first week of classes.

Once a week classes: Most sections meeting once a week have access to both the computer classroom and the traditional classroom for the entire class session. It is important to meet regularly in the computer room-on alternate weeks, perhaps, or part of every class session-since the room is reserved.

The computer classroom door will be opened at least 15 minutes prior to class. Instructors who find the door locked when they arrive for class should contact a consultant in CA 423, or ask for a key at the Dean’s office, CA 441.


Software in Computer Classrooms

On the desktops students will find MS Word, Publisher, Explorer, Firefox, PowerPoint, and Excel, as well as access to Oncourse and e-mail accounts. The University Library’s home page can also be accessed in class for online research. Students should be required to use Word so they can easily access their files in class. If they do not have Word on their home computer, they may download free software from IUWare (available to faculty as well).


Planning the Syllabus for Computer Room Classes

It’s a good idea for instructors to list computer room policies on their syllabi and to go over them with students the first time the class meets in the computer room. Following are some policies other instructors have included:

*Instructors who wish to take water or coffee class are asked to please leave it on the front table, not by the instructor workstation.

Faculty who teach in the computer classroom can consider scheduling activities on their computer room days that take advantage of the technology. They should look first at what they want to teach during a particular session, and then decide how technology might be integrated to achieve the objectives. The software/hardware should be tested in advance, to prepare clear instructions, and to make sure students understand the purpose of the activity. Require something to be reported or submitted, either verbally, on paper, or via e-mail, at the end of the activity to ensure that students stay on task (instead of  on Facebook!) Have a back-up plan in case the technology is unavailable due to system or equipment failure.

Faculty scheduled in the computer room on a day when technology does not fit their plans may ask students to turn off their monitors and set aside their keyboards. Students can move their chairs to improve sight lines or so they can form groups and work collaboratively.

Faculty themselves can decide what technologies will be introduced and when, always making clear to students the pedagogical reason for using the technologies, and introducing only the aspects of a program that further their goals for class that day. Students can be overwhelmed if they are shown all the options at once, and we want to keep the focus on curricular goals, not the technology used to achieve them.


Student Orientation to the Computer Classroom

Instructors are encouraged to offer a brief orientation to the computer classroom during one of their first class meetings in the room. Although most students are very comfortable with computers, many still need to be reminded to back up their work and to adhere to the computer classroom policies.

 

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Activities for Teaching Using Technology

Invention / Development / Integration of Sources / Revision / Collaborative Work and Peer Response Activities / Critical Reading / Research / Argument / Editing Activities / Miscellaneous Writing Activities / Instructor Response 

 

"Activities for Teaching Composition Using Technology" is devoted to teaching with technology. While many of the activities are designed for classes that meet in a computer classroom, many can be adapted for use in a traditional classroom. Our main objective for teaching composition with technology is to satisfy our pedagogical objectives by integrating technology in ways that help students accomplish curricular goals. The possibilities are endless, but the following list gives some specific examples of how instructional technology can help students achieve success.

Invention: Prewriting/Heuristics

 

Development

 

Integration of Sources

 

Synthesis

 

Documentation

 

Revision

Prior to revising their essay for the midterm, I ask students to look over my comments on their drafts and find one issue in particular—of grammar, form, style, organization, whatever—and look it up in Purdue’s online writing lab at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/. The OWL has tons of handouts that are clearly written and easily understood by students. 

After they have read about and feel they better understand this issue, they are to report on it to their classmates via an Oncourse discussion forum post. Students are in this way introduced to a valuable resource that many say they intend to keep using, their understanding of the issue is (theoretically) improved by explaining it to others, and they are exposed to a variety of issues (and information about them) by reading their classmates’ posts. 

Additionally, they are further encouraged to read and make use of the comments I’ve already placed on their papers. Most of this happens with very little additional work from me—though teachers should, of course, have some way of encouraging students to complete the process. In my case, the discussion forum posts (and a reply to a classmate) are required weekly (assignment is different each time). I do keep track of participation via a grid, and participation (including a few other elements) is ultimately worth 10% of the semester grade.

Collaborative Work and Peer Response Activities

 

Critical Reading

 

Research

 

Argument

 

Editing Activities

 

Miscellaneous Writing Activities

 

Instructor Response

 

EAP banner art 

EAP Courses

Undergraduate Courses / Graduate Courses / Continuing Education Courses

Undergraduate Course Sequence

Level I

Due to limited language proficiency, students at this level are generally restricted to taking only EAP, physical education, and one mathematics or computer science course.

Note:  G009 and G010 must be taken concurrently.
 

Level II

At this level, students generally take two EAP classes, but sometimes one or three, plus two freshman-level content courses. Courses requiring extensive reading and writing should be avoided.

Level III

At this level, students are capable of taking a full academic-load of classes, although courses should probably be restricted to general, freshman-level courses.


Graduate Course Sequence

Level I

Graduate students with weak language skills take the same EAP classes as the undergraduates at this level. Because their fields are more specialized and they bring more background, the type and number of courses these students can take beyond EAP are determined in consultation with their advisors. We recommend no more than two non-EAP classes for students at this level.

Level II

At this level, most graduate students only take one EAP class at a time if they need both, along with their regular graduate course work, although some will take both classes in one semester.


Continuing Education—Community Learning Network

ESL Classes

For more information, visit the Community Learning Network.

 

 

 

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Credit for Writing Courses

For transfer students / Comparable Credit / Credit by Examination / Special Credit Portfolio for W131

Requirements for writing classes are established by schools and degree programs at IUPUI, not by the Writing Program. Students should complete their writing requirement within their first two years (60 credit hours)  at IUPUI. Transfer students should take care of their writing course requirements as soon as they transfer.

In no case should students wait until their senior year or until applying for graduation to determine whether they have fulfilled their writing requirement.

 


Transfer Credit

Transfer students who fulfilled all or part of the composition requirement at their previous university will not necessarily have fulfilled it at IUPUI. Occasionally courses transfer as undistributed credit. The following policies will help you determine what steps to take depending on your situation:

Credit for W131

Credit for W270 (formerly W132) or W231


Comparable Credit

If you have taken a writing course at another university and it transferred as an undistributed English credit-not as credit for the course you expected it to-you should complete a comparable credit form, attach a bulletin description and a syllabus, and submit it to the Writing Program secretary in CA 423. You will be notified by email of the decision within six weeks.

Please note that grades of C- or lower do not fulfill IUPUI requirements.

If you receive notification that your petition was approved, you are responsible for confirming that the credit is recorded on your academic records. Do not wait until your senior year or until applying for graduation to determine whether you have fulfilled your writing requirement. Please call the Writing Program office at 274-3824 if you have questions.


Credit by Examination (AP, Clep, Dantes)

W131

W270 (formerly W132) and W231

 


Special Credit Portfolio for W131

The special credit portfolio option is open only to students who transfer with 30 credits or more who fulfilled the composition requirement at their previous university through SAT or ACT scores or a placement test.  Students should be aware that credit is not always awarded.  Please note that the special credit portfolio option is not available for W270 or W231.

View Instructions as pdf

Procedures for submitting a portfolio and criteria for evaluation
Special credit portfolios are evaluated by Writing Program administrators. The range of work included in the portfolio should demonstrate that you have already attained the goals of W131, Reading, Writing, and Inquiry I.  The portfolio should include three pieces of writing which, on the whole, demonstrate your ability to:

Each piece of writing must be accompanied by a statement that explains:

In addition, include a cover letter for the portfolio that describes the writing experiences you have had and makes a general argument about why you should receive credit for English W131. The letter should also include the number of semesters you have been enrolled at IUPUI, the number of credit hours you have earned, the name of the school at IUPUI you are seeking a degree in, your student ID number, email address, mailing address, and phone. If you have questions about assembling your portfolio, please call the Writing Program office at 274-3824.

You can submit your portfolio to:

Julie Freeman, Associate Director of Writing
Department of English, IUPUI
423 Cavanaugh Hall
425 University Boulevard
Indianapolis IN 46202
(317) 274-0092; jfreema@iupui.edu 

Your portfolio will be evaluated as soon as possible, usually within two weeks. If you receive notification that your portfolio earned you credit for W131, you are responsible for confirming that the credit is recorded on your academic records.  

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Writing Program Faculty Policies

 

Attendance / Incompletes / Religious Holidays / Returning Graded Work

 

Attendance

 

The Writing Coordinating Committee believes that classroom attendance is vital to succeeding in any writing course. Classroom activities that contribute to the process of students’ writing are a central part of students’ portfolios; students who do not come to class will find it difficult to put together portfolios that will earn grades as high as those put together by students who have attended regularly. If responsible students miss class from time to time, they can find ways to work outside of class that are in line with the goals for that particular class period. Students who miss a reader response activity in class might work with a classmate outside of class, for instance. Still, what goes on in our writing classrooms is the heart of the course, and students who are present and participating are best able to learn.

Students who are regularly in class, prepared, and participating, also are in the best position to demonstrate what they’ve learned about responding in their portfolios. 

The best way to encourage students to attend class is to demonstrate the value of class work, not by threatening to impose grade penalties at the end of the semester. Students’ grades are based entirely on the work they do, rather than on their physical presence in class. Although you may not lower semester grades because of excessive absence, you are free to discuss the impact of attendance on student learning. Your syllabus should include a statement about the importance of participation in workshop and class activities.  

Most of the introductory writing courses leave some portion of the semester grade up to the instructor to determine. Instructors who devise systems for calculating this portion of the semester grade should explain this method clearly on their syllabi.

The Writing Program follows the IUPUI Administrative Withdrawal Policy for students who miss more than 50% of classes during the first four weeks of the semester. Read the policy and see a sample paragraph for your syllabus here.

 

 

Incompletes

 

Eligibility: Incompletes are appropriate only when exceptional circumstances prevent students from finishing all course requirements by the end of the semester. Exceptional circumstances can include the serious illness of the student, spouse or partner, child, or parent; or a fire or accident that interrupts the end of the semester - circumstances which would cause the student to suffer a hardship if held to the previously established course deadlines.

A grade of Incomplete should be awarded only if the work is mostly complete, generally 75 to 80 percent, and of passing quality. A student who needs to retake the entire course is NOT ELIGIBLE for an incomplete. Neither is a student who has fallen behind due to procrastination.

Course coordinators can help faculty decide whether an incomplete is warranted. Basic guidelines for 75-80% of the work completed for each core writing course are:

  

Instructor Responsibilities:

  

Removal of Incomplete: In order to award the grade, instructors must submit a Removal of Incomplete form.

If the work has not been completed and a grade assigned within a year from the end of the semester in which the Incomplete was awarded, the Office of the Registrar will automatically change the grade to an F. Both the student and the faculty member will receive notification that this change is pending and should take steps immediately to resolve the Incomplete.

In rare cases at the end of the initial one year period, the student may ask the instructor to extend the Incomplete for an additional fixed period of time. If the instructor agrees, he or she should submit a grade of IX on the Removal of Incomplete form. This action will block the automatic change to F after one year.

In rare cases, instructors may opt to recommend or require students to attend another term of the course (or a portion thereof) in order to remove the Incomplete. In such cases, students should NOT re-enroll in the course. Instead, the student should make the necessary arrangements with the original instructor to sit in on the required class sessions. At the end of the term, the instructor would file the Removal of Incomplete with the Office of the Registrar. A student who is required to attend the course in a subsequent semester should understand that sitting in on the course or otherwise making up the Incomplete does not count as part of the student’s full-time or part-time load for financial aid purposes or for loan deferments.

In some cases, after receiving an Incomplete, the student may wish to withdraw from the course. This requires the signatures of the instructor and the student’s dean on a Removal of Incomplete form.

 

 

End of Semester Procedures: Returning Graded Work

 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student records. FERPA regulations prohibit faculty from leaving graded student papers in unsecured areas for students to pick up at their convenience (in front of their doors or in their cubicles, for example). 

SLA rules require all student work not returned to a student be kept until the student retrieves it or a year passes, whichever comes first. Our departmental secretaries will not be responsible for storing or returning students’ final papers. Therefore, as a semester is coming to an end, please choose one of the following options:

If you are not returning to teach with us, please contact your course coordinator to make arrangements regarding any unreturned student work.

 

Religious Holidays 

 

The Writing Program supports the Indiana University policy that calls on faculty to make reasonable accommodations for students who may need to be excused from classes due to religious observances. Many students in writing classes are new to college, and they may not realize what policies exist. We encourage faculty, particularly in the fall semester when there are many religious holidays and many new students, to refer to this policy either in class or on the syllabus. Program administrators are available to help faculty or students interpret and apply this policy.

The full text of the IU policy about religious holidays and academic obligations follows:

On occasion conflicts may occur between a student’s obligations in a course and the student’s obligations in observing major religious holidays. Indiana University respects the right of all students to observe their religious holidays and will make reasonable accommodation, upon request, for such observances. A student may ask to be excused from classes, examinations, or other scheduled assignments, such as laboratories, in order to observe these religious holidays. By action of the University Faculty Council, individual faculty are to make reasonable accommodation, upon request, for such observances. Dates and times for examinations and other major course obligations should be announced at the beginning of the semester and appear on the course syllabus. It is the student’s responsibility to inform instructors of conflicts no later than the second week of the semester so that reasonable accommodations may be provided. When possible, faculty should avoid scheduling examinations or other major academic occasions on these holidays.

This policy can be viewed on the Office of the Registrar’s website, which also lists major religious holidays for two calendar years to assist students and faculty in planning. A calendar and the campus implementation plan for enforcing the policy on religious holidays may be found here.

 

 

Writing Program

Writing Program Student Policies


Ethics and Plagiarism / Contesting Grades and Other Complaints


Ethics and Plagiarism

One of the goals of IUPUI’s introductory writing courses is to introduce students to strategies for and expectations about identifying, evaluating, and integrating source material into written work. Classmates, friends, and teachers may offer advice or reactions that help to shape writing and thinking. Published writers similarly influence writers, both in terms of ideas, style, and form. As students move through their writing courses, they should become more skilled at acknowledging both types of influence.

Each core writing course has a textbook with sections on adapting source use to writing, avoiding plagiarism, notetaking, and citing conventions. Citing sources is a technical issue (involving guidelines for format and punctuation), but more importantly a rhetorical issue (involving matters of ethics, persona, and credibility).

The information below raises important issues for students to consider, while respecting institutional and program guidelines about plagiarism and acknowledging sources.

Acknowledgments and Credibility
Writers handle others’ ideas in almost every type of writing, even the most personal and reflective (since other texts or people often influence what and how we remember). Students deal with this element of writing by acknowledging the influences on their texts by identifying what texts or people affected the composition process. Such acknowledgments offer readers valuable information that helps them judge a writer’s credibility and the soundness of conclusions. Acknowledgements of important texts allow readers to look up further information on a subject, should they be so inclined. The prefaces, footnotes, parenthetical notations, and bibliographies in published works can be a valuable resource for any researcher.

Plagiarism: Using and Citing Sources
Plagiarism, the term generally applied to violations of academic expectations about citing sources, can range from cheating to incomplete source documentation. The Indiana University Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities provides a fuller explanation of plagiarism and institutional penalties. The information below separates cheating, or fraud, from issues of plagiarism. The actions and consequences are described below and summarized in a table at the end of this section.


Members of the Writing Coordinating Committee are available to consult with students about issues of plagiarism if information from the teacher is not sufficient to answer questions. Generally speaking, SLA and IUPUI policies require that the instructor prepare a written account of the information that led to the suspicion of cheating, and offer the student a chance to respond to the allegations, via either conference or letter. In the original contact of this matter bewteen student and teacher, the student should be made aware of the penalty that may be imposed. If the student does not refute the charges within the specified period, the penalty can be imposed, with notification made to the Dean of Student Affairs.

Table 1: Ways of Using Sources and Possible Consequences 

Act

Description 

 Possible Consequences

Intentional Plagiarism or Cheating 

Turning in work written by someone else

Including - purposefully - long passages of someone else’s writing in the student’s essay without using any form of in-text citation

Lowered or failing grade on portfolio or course

Need to redo the assignment

Decreased credibility with readers

Unintentional Plagiarism

Using passages from readings without any in-text documentation, and without intent to deceive

Instructor intervention on a draft or early revision

Lowered or failing grade on portfolio or course

Need to revise

Decreased credibility with readers

Appropriate Use of Sources

Telling readers where information comes from, using signal phrases and appropriate in-text citations and works cited list

Increased credibility with readers

Readers can pursue writer’s sources

 
Rebecca Moore Howard’s "Plagiarisms, Authorships, and the Academic Death Penalty," College English 57.7 (1995): 788-806, was a useful resource in the preparation of this policy statement.

Plagiarism Resources

There are a number of sites that provide helpful information about plagiarism. Here are just a few: 

Understanding Plagiarism, at Indiana University School of Education, provides information and a quiz you can take to aid in your understanding of plagiarism. 

Plagiarism: What It is and How to Recognize and Avoid It, at Indiana University’s Writing Tutorial Services, includes examples of plagiarism, such as acceptable and unacceptable examples of paraphrasing, plus strategies for avoiding plagiarism.

Is It Plagiarism Yet?, at the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL), offers tips and exercises for students.

 

Contesting Grades and Other Student Complaints

At times, students may have a need to discuss complaints and concerns about their instructors, courses, or assignments with another faculty. The Writing Program treats student concerns with respect, although we encourage students and faculty to try to resolve any problems between them before requesting any outside help.

Members of the Writing Coordinating Committee are available to consult with students informally. Faculty addresses and those of writing program administrators are available in the directory; if you cannot contact the instructor, start with the course coordinator. If informal contact does not resolve the problem, formal procedures are available. A version of the Student Complaint form is below. Return the complaint form to the Writing Program office, CA 423.

Student Complaint Form

To address a concern about your grade in a writing class, you should first discuss the issue with your instructor. If for some reason you are unable to resolve your concerns by working with your instructor, you may submit a Student Complaint Form. Download the form, fill it out, and return it to the Writing Program Office (CA423). Attach the form to your portfolio (or other assignment) along with the written response you received from your instructor, including the grade and any evaluation sheets that indicate how the grade was determined. Course coordinators and other Writing Program administrators review student complaints. Although your instructor will not be involved in reviewing your complaint, he or she may be consulted. You should receive a response in 2 - 3 weeks.


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Registering for W131 Online


Please read this page before registering. Do not register for the online class if you are unable to attend the required orientation meeting (see class information in OneStart).
 

How is the virtual W131 classroom similar to a traditional W131 classroom?

When you enroll in an online section of W131, you and your classmates will meet the same goals and experience the same teaching and learning practices as students in every other W131 classroom except that your experience will take place in a virtual classroom. Just as other students in W131 work in writing groups, spend much of their classroom time in collaborative activities, and share their writing with others, you will use the features of Oncourse to participate in these same activities in an online section of W131. Visit the W131 Course Overview page for information about the W131 curriculum. 
 


How is the virtual W131 classroom different from a traditional W131 classroom?

 


What qualifies a student for W131 online?

  


How to register for the online class:

 

 

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Honor’s Reading, Writing, and Inquiry I Overview


Honors writing courses start with the same assumptions that govern all our writing courses, with additional assumptions added to shape the honors writing program. English W140 is designed on these principles:


W140 generally follows the same set of writing assignments as in W131. Those assignments are enriched, however, by instruction and experience in research and a more extensive use of primary and secondary resources, plus additional emphasis on stylistic elements of writing.

 


English W140 Course Goals

Students in W140 should meet the goals of W131. Goals may be added that are more directly related to research and to style. Students might be responsible for evaluating their sources for credibility, for instance, and for demonstrating their awareness of the relationship between form and function at the sentence level.

 

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Professional Writing Skills Overview


Professional Writing Skills (W231) is a Writing Program course for students in diverse majors. It fulfills a second writing class requirement for students in the Schools of Liberal Arts, Public and Environmental Affairs, Medicine Respiratory Therapy, Physical Education, Philanthropic Studies, Psychology, and Social Work, among others. It also carries elective credit under the English Major. Students are required to complete W131 (or a comparable composition class) with a grade of C or higher before enrolling in W231. Depending on enrollment figures, around 18 sections are offered each semester, with all sections meeting regularly in computer classrooms.

W231 introduces students to writing in workplace settings, developing research skills that will be of value not only in the workplace, but also in upper-level courses in the student’s major. The course assignments integrate previous writing experience with the discovery of the conventions of workplace writing, while a collaborative climate supports student responsibility for learning as they analyze and work within the constraints of various writing situations typically encountered on the job.

During the first part of the semester, students complete one or two writing projects, each graded individually. These assignments introduce students to the various genres in professional writing before they move on to learn research methods applied in an extensive project. The project allows students to put the writing principles learned in the first part of the course into practice by addressing a current problem in a local business or organizational setting.

Emphasizing information retrieval skills, analysis, interpretation, and application of findings, the project is done in collaborative teams, allowing students to develop expertise in team dynamics, an important qualification for personal growth and advancement in many careers. Writing in a "real-world" situation helps prepare students for the challenges they will encounter when writing on the job. Teams choose their target organizations by contemplating their majors, jobs, volunteer work, student organizations, and local communities, determining the problems experienced within each. Next, students conduct secondary and primary research to identify potential solutions. 

Sequenced to promote student success, the written assignments include a research proposal, an interview guide, an annotated bibliography, a literature review, a primary research instrument, and a recommendation report. The approach to problem solving taught in W231 not only emphasizes the value of teamwork and information retrieval skills, but it also prepares students for the creative and independent thinking expected in the workplace.  Upon successful completion of W231, students also earn Experiential Learning credit through the RISE to the IUPUI Challenge initiative.

W231 is available as both a hybrid (part online, part face-to-face) and as a regular face-to-face course. It will be available as an H-Option beginning in the fall of 2014. 

 

Course Goals and the PULs

The goals for W231 support the IUPUI Principles of Undergraduate learning, particularly those related to critical thinking and core communication skills. By the end of the course, successful students will have the ability to:

 

 

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Argumentative Writing Overview


English W270 (formerly W132), Argumentative Writing, is the required second writing course for students in the School of Liberal Arts and one of the most frequently elected courses for the second semester requirement in the School of Science. The course introduces students to research writing as a process of inquiry that culminates in an informed position. Such work is not only the work of scholars but the work of responsible citizens, for it fosters thoughtful decision making and the ability to speak to important issues with authority based upon credible information. 

Today’s technological environment, with its easy access to information, makes evaluation of information an essential element of the research process; W270 students gain practice at applying basic criteria to the resources they discover. Using those resources presents students with the ethical concerns of research as well: the responsibility to consider varied viewpoints, the responsibility to represent others’ ideas fairly, and to use academic documentation systems to acknowledge the ideas of others. As students read and write, they gain practice with the documents of academic research and with the issues of research as an activity.

Students also participate in the self-analysis of metawriting in writer’s statements, portfolio arguments, and revision plans. Students document their work in three portfolios throughout the semester; the first and second each count for 25% of the semester grade. The first portfolio documents work on argumentation, analysis, and summary in a literature review, critical annotated bibliography, and research proposal; the second documents independent research in critical annotations, a mini-literature review, and a draft of a researched argument. The final portfolio, which counts for 50% of the semester grade, documents revising, polishing, and developing the researched argument. 

W270 is not available as an H-Option.



English W270 Course Goals

Students who successfully complete this course will learn to:

Students demonstrate successful achievement of these goals in portfolios.



 

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Reading, Writing, And Inquiry I Overview


English W131, Reading, Writing, And Inquiry I, is required of almost every Indiana University and Purdue University undergraduate student. 

The course teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifcats, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students’ abilities to read written and cultural texts critically, to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students’ own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims. 

In the W131 standard curriculum, students write a series of papers, exploring various forms of prose writing. Generally, a nonfiction book provides an anchor around which students, in collaboration with their instructor, pursue a set of related ideas, each grounded in the overall thematic focus of the book. Paper assignments are based on these ideas and allow students to choose a topic within the common dialogue about the book.

In addition, because paper assignments promote experience with different kinds of writing for various audiences, students learn to develop important rhetorical skills, such as developing a purpose, identifying a viable audience, writing to appeal to that audience, and negotiating the language requirements for success with selected genres.

  


The First Half of W131

The first half of W131 encourages students to explore their responses to readings and to life experiences to understand how those responses can help them to participate in broader discussions of social concern. As they read texts of multiple writers, students also will be asked to consider what makes those texts successful, i.e., what decisions writers make about how to use writing to communicate effectively.

This work during the first half culminates in a midterm portfolio, a body of work that includes the pre-writing, drafts, and final version of one of the papers written to this point, plus a reflective paper. These documents demonstrate, among other things, the process a student is developing to bring a paper to completion and is evaluated based on how well a student is progressing on the six course goals. The grade for this portfolio is worth roughly 1/3 of the semester grade. 

  


The Second Half of W131

The second half of W131 focuses on developing more fully the skills learned in the first half. A key feature is learning to analyze and synthesize instructor-provided outside sources to produce more sophisticated writing that contributes substantively to a discussion of cultural significance. Students should show a range of abilities with different kinds of writing and present their work in a final portfolio that is typically comprised of two papers of the student’s choosing (one of which is from the second half), plus a reflective paper. 

This final portfolio is evaluated based on how well the student has met the course goals and is worth roughly 2/3 of the semester grade.   

  


English W131 Course Goals

Students completing W131 should be able to demonstrate that they:

  

  

  

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Stretch Program Overview


The IUPUI Stretch Program, English W130/W131, offers students a yearlong introduction to the demands of college literacy by stretching the traditional W131 curriculum over two semesters.

In W130 and the accompanying section of W131, students work on three formal assignments and submit a final portfolio in each course. So students in the W130/W131 stretch program write more essays as students in the traditional W131. Students have more time to practice and reflect as they develop academic literacy skills.

More importantly, because the pace of writing assignments is slower in W130/131, the curriculum provides students with more time to work on acquiring new reading strategies and new uses for reading as part of inquiry and writing. These additional reading assignments in W130 develop students’ abilities to write the formal writing assignments, two of which are the same as in the traditional W131 course.

Ideally, students work with the same instructor for both semesters and stay with the same group of classroom peers, creating a supportive community of writers and learners.  

  


English W130/W131 Course Goals and Expected Outcomes

The stretch program, like all the writing courses at IUPUI, supports the Principles for Undergraduate Learning, particularly the core communication skills. In addition, the course sequence implements national outcomes for composition courses described in the Council of Writing Program Administrators’ Outcomes Statement.

Rhetorical knowledge: this covers those things students need to know about the writing situation, such as audience and purpose. By the end of W130/131, students should be able to:


General reading, writing, and thinking skills:
this covers general reading, writing, and thinking skills students need to meet the demands of various writing situations. By the end of W130/131, students should be able to:


Processes:
this covers the processes students need to follow to produce successful texts. By the end of W130/131, students should know how to use:


Conventions:
this covers specific conventions, such as spelling and punctuation, that readers expect writers to control. By the end of W130/131, students should be able to:

 


Instructor Resources

More information and instructor resources can be found in the Stretch Program Curriculum Guide.

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Writing Program Directory

For faculty in the EAP program, click here.

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Writing Program Courses


Course Overviews

 

 

  

PEC—Contact Information

 

For more information, contact the director,  Professor William F. Touponce (wtouponc@iupui.edu), or visit the program website.

 

Specific questions may be directed to the individuals listed below.

 

Graduate Certificate in Professional Editing

 

Director of Graduate Studies

Professor Bill Touponce, Institute for American Thought
(ES0010, 274-0081; wtouponc@iupui.edu)

 

Senior Textual Editor

Professor Jon Eller, Institute for American Thought
(ES0010, 274-1451; jeller@iupui.edu)

 

Coordinator for Documentary Editing

Professor Marianne Wokeck, Santayana Edition
(ES0010, 274-5820; mwokeck@iupui.edu)

 


 

 

The Consortium of Scholarly Editions

 

The Peirce Edition Project

Professor Nathan Houser, General Editor
ES0010

 

The Santayana Edition

Professor Marianne Wokeck, Editor
ES0010

 

Frederick Douglass Papers

Professor Jack McKivigan, General editor
Cavanaugh 531

 

 

PEC—The Consortium of Scholarly Editions

 

The teaching faculty of IUPUI’s three resident scholarly editions and the hands-on editing experience that students will gain through study with these projects represents a significant core resource for the graduate certificate in Professional Editing. The consortium consists of:

 

 

The editors, teaching faculty, and technical staff of the Peirce and Santayana editions also maintain significant archival holdings and centralized documentary resources on their subject authors.


The growing need to recover the history of texts has led to several kinds of scholarly editing. Some academic editors work to recover a damaged text from decades or even centuries of publishing corruption; others work to publish and annotate a neglected manuscript that never made it to press in the author’s lifetime. In general, scholarly editing involves identifying, collecting, recovering, annotating, and presenting an author’s work in a new and reliable version. IUPUI’s Consortium of Scholarly Editions represents a unique concentration of scholarly editing in higher education; it provides most of the expertise, and, through the editing laboratories of the Peirce and Santayana editions, the core learning environment for the graduate certificate in Professional Editing.


The specialized work of scholarly editing leads the way for the technologies that corporate and government editors apply in the general editing community. Because editing is essentially a recursive activity that is integral to all stages of document production, many of the challenges facing scholarly editors of historical authors (text mark-up, archiving, and the management of documents) also concern technical and corporate editors dealing with today’s writers. Areas of concentration offered under the certificate include Technical Editing and Journalism, thus extending the academic program even further into the professional editing community.

 

 

PEC—Requirements

 

Total requirement

 

minimum of 15 credit hours, which include:

 

The certificate program focuses on the scholarly editing concentrations directly supported by the major editorial research centers of the School of Liberal Arts (the Frederick Douglass Papers, the Peirce Edition Project, and the Santayana Edition). Experience with the teaching faculty and editing laboratories of SLA’s consortium of scholarly editions provides standardization through at least one consortium-based core course in each concentration. The W609 capstone projects for the Journalism, Technical, and general professional editing students will include opportunities to complete graduate-level research projects in such areas as:

  1.  editing the electronic research databases of the Peirce and Santayana library and manuscript deposits,
  2.  enumerative and notational bibliographical research projects focused on specific volumes-in-progress of these editions,
  3.  extended essays in textual criticism of important American and British authors, and
  4.  research projects in bibliographical and textual analysis that will allow students to apply scholarly editing techniques to important texts in the history of their home disciplines.

 

Students in the Scholarly Editing concentrations are not required to develop a W609 project, but may also develop one as an open elective. Advising will be conducted by the teaching faculty resident to the scholarly editions (Professors Eller, Touponce and Wokeck); they will design the W609 projects and will encourage students in professional and technical concentrations to use one elective option to take either an L590 or H543 internship with one of the in-house editions or a selection from the scholarly editing core.

 

1. Core Options


Three courses, 9-12 credit hours. Complete one of the following field concentrations, or (with advisor approval) create a three-course concentration combining relevant courses from the four professional fields:

A. Scholarly Editing Concentration I: Critical or Eclectic Texts (English, 12 credit hours)
B. Scholarly Editing Concentration II: Documentary Texts (History, 11 credit hours)
C. Technical Editing Concentration (English, 9-10 credit hours)
D. Professional Editing Concentration I: Journalism (9-10 credit hours)

 

E. Professional Editing Concentration II: General (under development; English, 11-12 credit hours)

 

2. Open Elective Course(s)

 

One or two courses, 3-6 credit hours. Chose one or two courses (depending on the number of hours required to meet the 15-hour certificate minimum after completion of the chosen core concentration). Any of the core options listed above (outside of the student’s chosen field concentration) may be counted as an open elective, as well as any of the following courses:

 

Other appropriate courses in English, History, Philosophy, Informatics, Library and Information Science, Journalism, and New Media may count as an open elective if approved by the certificate program advisor.

 

 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Teaching Writing Certificate Courses



 

W500 Teaching Writing: Issues and Approaches (4 cr.)
This course looks at one of the mainstays of teaching writing-the process of writing-and the issues that arise in writing classrooms as well as the approaches that have been used to resolve such issues. As with W509 and W590, the course examines the theories that converged to produce process pedagogy, but the emphasis of the course is on the practical aspect of teaching writing. These practical aspects include structuring class time, organizing peer groups, constructing writing assignments, the teaching of grammar, evaluation and grading, and language differences. Thus, the course looks beyond the application of theory (W590) to the more practical concerns of implementing theory-based ideas systematically and effectively.

W508 Creative Writing for Teachers (4 cr.)
Giving students a deeper understanding of the creative process and teaching them to think and talk about writing as writers do, this course offers strategies for critiquing creative work and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum suited to their classroom needs. The class emphasizes hands-on writing activities in poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction that are easily adaptable for use with student writing at every level. Most exercises and writing techniques are also useful in teaching expository writing and fulfill state requirements. This is a course that stresses the development of a process over the production of finished works.

W509 Introduction to Writing and Literacy Studies (4 cr.)
This course is one of the gateway courses in the English M.A. and is the required core course for the Certificate in Teaching Writing. It focuses on the concerns of scholars in rhetoric and composition, and literacy studies more broadly. It serves as an introduction to what these scholars write, and to how they use various methods to investigate important research questions associated with writing and literacy practices.  In the process, it prepares students to be critical readers of academic writing and introduces them to possible directions for research.

W510 Computers in Composition (4 cr.)
This course explores the technological theories that shape writing instruction at the secondary and post-secondary level. Students will read theory-centric texts and compose critical responses. These writings will culminate in a semester project of no fewer than 15 pages. In addition, students are asked to engage with a range of digital composing software including: image editors, page layout programs online content management systems, and web authoring software. The purpose of this work is to encourage students to reexamine their assumptions about teaching and technology. Ideally, students will leave W510 able to intervene into the use of digital software in educational settings.

W531 Designing and Editing Visual Technical Communication (4 cr.) 
In this course, students learn principles of designing publications that communicate both visually and verbally, learn to create and edit paper and electronic publications for clients’ contexts, develop project management skills, and enhance group collaborative writing skills. This course counts toward the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing.

W590 Teaching Writing: Theories and Applications (4 cr.)

Drawing on current scholarship and relevant statements from the rhetorical tradition, W590 examines theoretical assumptions in the design of classroom practices. The course focuses on knowing what we teach-and why-when we say that we teach writing. It also investigates how theories of reading, language, and technology apply to composition; how processes are central to written composition and teaching it; and how learning to write involves social and individual activities. Students respond to the assigned readings and analyze writing experiences taken from a variety of contexts, culminating in an independent project on a specific issue.

W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Qualitative Research in Literacy (4 cr.)

This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of conducting qualitative research on writing and reading. Student will spend the majority of the semester designing and conducting a research project on the literacy practices of a local group of readers/writers. Such a project is demanding and requires students to be self-directed. This work will be rewarded with experiences and data that will directly apply to each student’s research and teaching goals. Students will: 1) Construct a solid theoretical understanding of qualitative research methods; 2) Gain practical experience conducting research; 3) Further their research and teaching agendas.

W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Basic Writing Pedagogy (4 cr.)
This course examines the history, theory, and practice of basic writing in the United States. Rather than adhere to a single definition of basic writing, W600 asks students to analyze how scholars and institutions construct "basic writing" and "basic writers" within particular social and historical frames. Through these analyses, students will develop strategies for approaching the problematic of basic writing in their current and future work as instructors. This course prepares students to develop more nuanced understandings of basic writing theory and more sophisticated approaches to basic writing instruction.

W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities (4 cr.)
In the culture or institution of literacy, one dialect or language variety is sanctified as proper for writing-the so-called "grapholect," or Edited Written English. However, we are seeing more and more significant publication (fiction and nonfiction) in dialects of English previously considered oral (e.g., by Alice Walker, Gloria Anzaldua, Geneva Smitherman). In this course, we will consider the language variety or dialect called "correct" or "standard written English," its meaning, history, and politics. We will view this dialect against the backdrop of a multicultural, multilingual nation drawing on the English language as a means of articulating other identities and realities besides those expressed by mainstream writers. In addition to examining home and community language varieties from a sociolinguistic perspective, we will look at policies such as "Students’ Right to Their Own Language" and recent approaches to language learning such as code-shifting and code-meshing, as well as the influence of global Englishes (non-U.S. English varieties).

W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition:  Teaching Technical and Professional Writing (4 cr.) 
In this course, students develop a deeper understanding of the theory that undergirds the teaching of technical/professional writing, design a technical/professional writing course and its activities, and learn to respond thoughtfully to and assess student work.  The course addresses secondary and post-secondary teaching situations and counts toward the graduate Teaching Writing Certificate. 

W605 Writing Project Summer Institute (3-6 cr.)
The Summer Institute invites teachers from K-university to consider major issues involved in the teaching of writing and explore the pedagogical approaches inherent in these issues.  The institute follows the National Writing Project philosophy, which insists on the primacy of teacher knowledge, expertise, and leadership, and believes that teachers of writing must be writers themselves. Thus, two important strands in the Summer Institute are (1) Teachers demonstrating effective instructional practices and discussing writing pedagogy, and (2) Individual writing fellows working on writing and research projects that they initiate, plan and complete under the direction of the HWP co-directors.

W609 Individual Writing Projects
For more information, contact the Kim Brian Lovejoy (317-274-2120), Director of the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing.

W615 Graduate Creative Nonfiction Writing (4 CR)
This is an advanced course in the theory and practice of creative nonfiction writing with an emphasis on the personal or familiar essay.  Students will read a collection of important statements about the art and craft of essay writing as well as some classic and contemporary examples of the genre. Students will also produce and be graded on a significant body of work in the genre as well as a series of reading responses and regular written critiques of peer work-in-progress.

W697: Independent Study in Writing: Writing Project Advanced Institute (1-3credits)
This course is by application and invitation only. Teachers K-university explore current theories of writing and their application in the classroom.  Preference is given to active classroom teachers. 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Teaching Writing Certificate Requirements

Admission

Admission to the Certificate program requires one of the following:

 

Apply

Access an online application here.  Please note that the Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing is located under IU Graduate School. On the application in the Intended Program and Plan section, select the following:

NOTE: The certificate programs do not require letters of recommendation. However, the online application can only be submitted if at least one recommender is named. Therefore, you can simply add the following information:  Pat King, 425 University Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN 46202, patmking@iupui.edu.

 

Curriculum Requirements

Teachers earn a Certificate by satisfactorily completing five graduate courses, or a minimum of 20 credit hours, in the teaching of writing. The five graduate courses consist of one core course and four elective courses. Four graduate credit hours may be taken at another accredited institution with approval by the Graduate Certificate adviser.

Core course (4 cr.):

Elective courses: (16 cr.):

 

For a description of the above courses, click here


 

 

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TESOL Admission Requirements

 

TESOL Certificate

 

M.A. in English - TESOL Option

 

Application Process


Students are admitted in both the Fall and Spring semesters. Contact the TESOL Program for information on deadlines.  To apply, see online application link.

 

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TESOL Programs

 

The Department of English at IUPUI offers two graduate TESOL degrees: a TESOL certificate and an M.A. in English with a TESOL concentration.  Learn more about the IUPUI graduate program and access an online application here.

 

TESOL Certificate


The TESOL Certificate is a 21-credit hour program that can be completed in one calendar year. Students enroll in the following required courses plus an additional four credits of electives:

 

 

M.A. in English - TESOL Option


The M.A. degree is a 36-credit hour program that usually takes two years to complete. Students take all the above TESOL Certificate courses, an additional core course in teaching composition (ENG W509) or literature/literary studies (ENG L506), two to three additional elective courses, and complete an M.A. thesis. See the link on the left for information about the IUPUI English Department M.A. in English.

 

ESP Emphasis


Students may pursue an optional emphasis in English for Specific Purposes by taking LING T600 as one of their electives and completing their TESOL Practicum (LING L535) in an ESP setting.

 

 

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TESOL Program Faculty


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ASL Degree Requirements

 

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

 

Certificate Program Requirements

A Certificate in ASL/English Interpreting is available to students who have already completed a baccalaureate degree.  Contact the Director for further information.

 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Welcome to the MA in English


 

 

Writing Program

The Writing Program

Writing Program courses provide the foundation for writing in college and beyond. The IUPUI Writing Program offers core undergraduate, "gateway," writing courses. These fulfill two levels of writing requirements for most undergraduate degree programs at IUPUI.

Students generally fulfill the first level requirement with W131, but they may also place themselves into W130-W131 (Stretch) or W140 (Honors) using Guided Self-Placement

Second-level requirements are fulfilled by completing a course from several options, depending upon the student’s academic program. Those options include W231 or W270 (formerly W132). Students who completed W132 by the end of Fall 2013 do not need to take W270. (As of Spring 2014, W132 is no longer offered.)

For more information on any of these courses, click here.

Diverse in content and purpose, yet united in quality, these courses support the University’s mission and its Principles of Undergraduate Learning in unique and exciting ways.

 

Location and Hours
Cavanaugh Hall 423
425 University Boulevard
Indianapolis IN 46202-5140
tel.: 317-274-3824
fax: 317-274-2347 

The office is generally open Monday-Friday, 8am to 4pm.


 

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SPEAK Test

SPEAK Test Registration and Fees / SPEAK Test Results, Retesting, and Appeals / SPEAK Test Scoring Rubric
 

By IUPUI policy, international TAs who are being considered for an instructional role in which they will have direct contact with undergraduate students must demonstrate their English proficiency before beginning their appointment. The IUPUI Policy on Oral English Competency for International TAs can be found here.

In the SPEAK test, you demonstrate how well you speak English. The test lasts approximately 20 minutes. You will be asked questions by an interviewer on tape. The questions are printed in the test book and the time you will have to answer each one is printed in parentheses after each questions. You are encouraged to answer the questions as completely as possible in the time allowed. While most of the questions on the test may not appear to be directly related to your academic or professional field, each question is designed to tell the raters about your oral language ability. The raters will evaluate how well you communicate in English.

A sample SPEAK Test (which is the same as the Test of Spoken English - TSE) can be downloaded from this link.


Speak Test Registration and Fees

To register for the SPEAK Test, the department representative (secretary, advisor, etc.) should contact the EAP Program Office (274-2188) to register the graduate student for the next available testing time. There is a $30 test fee, which is charged to the student’s department.


SPEAK Test Results, Retesting, and Appeals

The SPEAK Test is evaluated using the rating scale provided. Students who are considered for an assistantship with direct student contact must have a SPEAK score> 50 in order to have primary instructional responsibility for a class or lab section. Students who do not earn a SPEAK score > 50 are required to take ENG G020 before retaking the SPEAK test. A more detailed placement based on the students’ performance on the test is explained in the letter sent to the students’ department/advisor. View sample letter.

Retesting of the SPEAK Test, with permission from the graduate’s department, is allowed. The department representative would contact the EAP Program Office (274-2188) asking for an appointment time for a SPEAK Test and would, at that time, tell the EAP Program that this is a retesting student. There will be an additional $30 fee for the retest.
 

Appeal for Alternative Test Format

If the student is still not satisfied with the SPEAK Test Rating, an appeal can be made to the EAP Program Director to begin the appeal process by requesting an alternate test format. The student, with department permission, can choose to plan and deliver a typical presentation/lecture for the particular class the student would be working with. The audience of the presentation will be two representatives from the English for Academic Purposes Program and a representative from the graduate student’s department. This committee of three will evaluate the presentation and determine the student’s placement.


SPEAK Test Scoring Rubric

60 Communication almost always effective: task performed very competently


50 Communication generally effective: task performed competently


40 Communication somewhat effective: task performed somewhat competently


30 Communication generally not effective: task performed poorly


20 No effective communication: no evidence of ability to perform task

 

 All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. --George Orwell, Animal Farm

Teaching Writing Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing is a 20-hour program of study for certified middle school or high school teachers, part-time university writing faculty and lecturers in other disciplines, and M.A. students interested in earning a certificate in writing to enhance their professional teaching careers. To facilitate the schedules of grade 6-12 teachers, courses are offered on weekends, weekday evenings, and during the summer (e.g., two-week intensive courses).

The Certificate requires completion of five graduate courses consisting of one core course and four elective courses. Major topics include theories and methods of teaching writing; understanding linguistic diversity; uses of technology in writing; social aspects of writing development; non-fiction writing; writing assessment; and teacher research. Graduate credits earned can be applied toward the M.A. in English upon acceptance into the M.A.

The aims of the Certificate program are as follows:

 

For questions about admission to the program and graduation procedures contact:
Pat King, CA 502L
317-274-2258 or patmking@iupui.edu

Questions about advising and curriculum should be directed to:
Professor Kim Brian Lovejoy, klovejoy@iupui.edu, 317-274-2120, or
Pofessor Steve Fox, sfox@iupui.edu, 317-278-2054

 

Student Consumer Information About this Program 

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Teaching English as a Second Language

TESOL as a Global Need

TESOL is an exciting, in-demand and interdisciplinary field, with nearly endless job opportunities around the world. TESOL graduates can find employment both domestically but most readily internationally as teachers, administrators, materials developers, editors, cultural liaisons, and language program directors. They work in such diverse settings as schools, non-profit organizations, governmental agencies, community and faith-based centers, and international businesses.

Why IUPUI?

Our faculty are internationally recognized, award-winning scholars whose areas of expertise span an impressive array of disciplines, including:


In addition, the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Program, which provides English for academic purposes instruction to IUPUI students, and the Indiana Center for Intercultural Communication (ICIC), an internationally recognized research center that also offers English for specific purposes programs, are both housed on the IUPUI campus. ELS Language Centers also has a site at IUPUI. Along with many community-based operations (e.g., Literacy Volunteers), there are many opportunities to gain experience in TESOL as a student at IUPUI.

 

TESOL Contact Information

Department of English
IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI
502L Cavanaugh Hall
425 University Boulevard
Indianapolis, IN 46202
Phone: 317.274.2258

Prof. Julie A. Belz
Director, TESOL Certificate
317.274.2190
jbelz@iupui.edu

 

Professional Editing Certificate

 

The Professional Editing Certificate provides an interdisciplinary range of core and elective courses designed for graduate students who want:

 

 

The certificate is a stand-alone graduate professional credential, but it also represents an interim stage of professional education within the larger framework of the M.A. in Professional and Technical Editing (students should not assume availability of the M.A. until institutional approval of funding is certain).



Courses cover the fundamental theories and methods involved in the practice of scholarly editing and other more general applications of professional editing. The program is taught in a laboratory-style environment and includes related technological applications found at the center of commercial and scholarly publishing today. The interdisciplinary curriculum also supports other established graduate and research programs in specific disciplines: English, History, and Philosophy as well as Library and Information Science, Journalism, and New Media. Although it is a free-standing graduate program, Professional Editing can easily complement and enhance any of the affiliated graduate programs.  Learn more about the IUPUI graduate program and access an online application here.  Please note:  If you have already submitted an application for a graduate or certificate program in English at IUPUI, you will need to use a new pin and password.  If this is the case, please contact Pat King so she can waive the application fee.

 

 

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Writing and Literacy Requirements


English majors must take at least 15 hours of 300/400 level courses in the major. A minimum grade of C is required in each course in this concentration.

Gateway Course (3 cr.)
W210 Literacy and Public Life 

Concentration Core (18 cr.): 

English Experience (9 cr.)
Film Studies or Literature (3 cr.): Choose one 200- or higher level course
Linguistics (3 cr.): Choose one 200- or higher (or elective if a linguistics course has been taken as part of the core)
Elective (other than Writing & Literacy) (3 cr.): Choose one 200- or higher level course in another area of the department

Capstone (3 cr.)
Choose one:
- E450 Capstone Seminar
- W490 Senior Seminar

 

Interested in a Minor in Writing and Literacy? There are several to choose from:

Writing and Literacy

Professional and Public Writing

Proressional and Digital Writing

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Writing and Literacy Opportunities

The term ‘literacy’ comprises multiple aspects and degrees of culture, learning, and language. Literacy, then, is more than the ability to read and write: it encompasses, among other things, analysis, synthesis, text production, creative thinking, and understanding how language works. Rapid-changing technology-which is producing new ways to communicate, to learn, and to view the world around us-opens up new meanings for literacy, as well.

The Writing and Literacy track provides students with expertise in such matters of literacy, and it allows students to apply that knowledge to dramatic and exciting new literacy opportunities.

As a result, students who complete a concentration in Writing and Literacy have a number of options open to them. Some alumni become professional writers for corporations; others work as proofreaders, editors or copy-editors for book publishers. Some hold technical writing jobs, or they work as freelancers, writing in such genres as film review. Others apply their communication expertise to work in professions like human resources and public relations.

Some graduates may adapt the literacy practices of critical creative thinking to gain entry into high-level professional positions in which the ability to connect with colleagues across cultures and socio-economic boundaries is key.

Others view the concentration as an important foundation for graduate or law school, or simply to prepare them for diversity in their community and workplace. Here is what a few students, alumni, and faculty say about the Writing and Literacy concentration.

 

 

Whitney Grout

Whitney Grout"The writing and literacy track has given me the understanding of how to promote acceptance, diversity, and education. G204 and English W366 have allowed me to understand the differences there are in cultures and dialects and how important it is to understand how language evolves. I have become experienced in writing for publications, research, entertainment, and interviews. The classes have given me a diverse palate to use when writing for any audiences or situation. The writing and literacy track shows how to apply English to everyday life and how to accept lingual diversity."

A double degree-seeking student, Whitney received her BA in Psychology in December 2009, and will receive a BA in English in May 2010.

 

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Writing and Literacy Faculty


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Writing and Literacy Courses


W210 Literacy and Public Life
An introduction to the uses of literacy in public and civic discourse, with connections made to theories of writing and professional prospects for writers; serves as the required gateway course for the Concentration in Writing and Literacy and as an exploration of this concentration for other English majors and students considering the possibility of an English major.

W262 Style and Voice in Writing
Voice pulls readers into a writer’s world, the "sound" of that writer’s voice "speaking" to readers. This course focuses on recognizing, developing, and sharpening your written voice. But how do you recognize that voice? What are its characteristics? How do you challenge yourself to experiment with language? How do you adapt to the plethora of writing you do as a student, in the workplace, or on your own, while maintaining the unique stamp that is your own? This course examines  a variety of published authors’ works, identifying the stylistic choices that shaped those works, thereby building awareness of the variety of stylistic choices available to you as a writer. You will apply that awareness to your own writing, and examine the decision making processes that equip you to "voice" your ideas in vivid and concise language, "speaking" on the page in your unique voice.

W310 Language and the Study of Writing
A course about writing using linguistic perspectives. Some of the topics discussed are writing systems and their history, a comparison of speaking and writing, the analysis of texts and their structure, the writing process and its development, and orality and literacy.

W312 Writing Biography
Write like a magazine journalist. Write about other peoples’ lives. Conduct interviews and work in the archives of University Library. Upper-division students gain experience in nonfiction life writing and research by producing four pieces of biographical writing: an obituary, a short life profile, a group-produced profile supported by University Library’s Special Collections resources and staff, and a final profile with student choice of style and subject.

W313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose
Students will read and analyze professional and student work as they prepare to practice the art of fact by combining the tools of a researcher with the craft of a novelist. The final portfolio includes a stylistic analysis of the student’s and others’ nonfiction works as well as two illustrated nonfiction texts based on the student’s primary and secondary research.

W315 Writing for the Web
Introduces students to new forms of writing beyond word processing and desktop publishing made possible by computers-hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing-and explores what impact these new forms have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.

W318 Finding your E-voice (online)
This course is designed to foster the understanding of and appreciation for the differences between academic and multimedia "voice." Through reading, exploration, discussions, activities and practice, students will begin the process of finding their "e-voice." Designing and producing multimedia for the English department website will further refine this growing e-voice.

W320 Writing in the Arts and Sciences
Introduces students to scholarly reading and writing in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, focusing on the similarities and differences in the ways academic writers share knowledge in their respective fields. Using as a course text a set of scholarly articles and book chapters, the course examines how writers in different disciplines define problems, how they investigate these problems, and how they report their findings.

W331 Business and Administrative Writing
W331 teaches students the rhetorical principles and practices necessary for producing effective writing and collaborative projects in professional contexts. Students will learn to plan, produce, and mange short- and long-term writing projects, gaining experience with various writing technologies. This course emphasizes  the challenges of meeting readers’ needs while simultaneously representing the best interests of the writer and his or her employer. W331 focuses on writing ethically and responsibly as an employee and as a member of society. By the end of the semester, students should see a marked improvement in their writing and level of professionalism. Completion of W231 Professional Writing Skills is strongly encouraged before taking W331.

W365 Theories and Practices of Editing
Instruction and practice in the mechanical, stylistic, and substantive editing of English nonfiction prose, from a wide variety of genres and on a wide variety of subjects.

W366 Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities
Is standard written English fixed and immutable or a living language variety? This course explores the definition, history, and politics of standard written English, the influence of home and community languages, and the uses and representation of linguistic diversity in both fiction and non-fiction texts.

W377 Writing for Social Change
The focus of W377 is on public discourse directed toward action, such as texts directed to the media, letters to public officials, and organizational texts. Other kinds of writing that can have social change as a major purpose may be considered, such as memoir writing, graffiti and street art, tabling, book reviews, essays, and literary works. Students apply theoretical perspectives learned in the course to analyse the rhetorical nature of texts associated with organizing and social action and to create their own texts, working individually and in small groups. Students can successfully advocate for constructive social change.

W390 Topics in Writing
Topics will vary each time this course is offered, and the department will specify which area of the concentration in Writing and Literacy each offering will count toward. May be repeated once for credit.

W390 Topics in Writing: Introduction to Health Literacy
This course will introduce students to the role of health literacy in our multicultural society and how to apply it to health communication. The course is designed to appeal to students in the following fields: composition and literacy, public health, pre-med, nursing, bioethics, sociology, applied and sociolinguistics, interpretation, and journalism. Specific topics will be selected based on participants’ areas of interest.

W400 Issues in the Teaching of Writing
Focuses on the content of rhetoric and composition and considers fundamental theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of writing. Reviews rhetorical and compositional principles that influence writing instruction, textbook selection, and curriculum development.

W412 Technology and Literacy
Literacy and technology have multifaceted relationships with each other. This course explores the effects of technologies ranging from clay tablets to the printing press to computers on literate practices and the teaching of reading and writing. It prepares students to think critically about the possibilities and limitations associated with different technologies and their impact on literacy over time, and to analyze educational uses of technology connected with literacy.

W426 Writing Nonfiction for Popular and Professional Publication
"I’ve been writing constantly for years but I don’t have any idea how to make the transition from academic to workplace writing."  Sound familiar? If so, let the experiences of W426 help you to integrate and apply the academic writing skills you have gained during your undergraduate work in multiple disciplines. Write for Liberal Arts publications to gain experience and writing samples for your job portfolio. And, meet an array of professionals who bring their experience and expertise to the classroom to help you understand the current job market for students with strong writing skills.

W496 Writing Fellows Seminar
Undergraduates interested in becoming tutors in the University Writing Center (UWC) enroll in W496 to learn about tutoring ethics, professionalism, and strategies for working with student writers. During the W496 internship, students learn to serve as a "practice audience" through critical thinking, analysis, and problem solving. W496 students also apply their learning through an internship of 6 hours a week in the UWC, with the support of veteran tutors. Each student who successfully earns a grade of "A" in ENG-W496, may then become a paid UWC employee at the beginning of the following semester.

Z204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage
What in blazes is "rhetorical grammar"?  "Rhetoric" is the "art or study of using language effectively and persuasively," but in this course, we will work to regard grammar as more than "a prescriptive set of rules setting forth the current standard."  The course will examine the ways in which the words writers and speakers choose impact readers and listeners by analyzing readings and speeches.  It will consider the role of "correctness" in discourse communities, and the connections between writing and usage guides.  Students will analyze their own use of language by writing short papers and by working with papers of their choice that they have written in the past.  The goal of the course will be to foster students’ conceptualization of "grammar" as not a rigid set of rules, but as a tool that allows writers and speakers rich flexibility of expression. 

Z301 History of the English Language
This course traces the development of English, looking at the language itself (its sounds, its vocabulary, its dialects) and the social and political forces that have influenced the English language and those who use it in speech and writing. Three basic themes provide the structure for our semester: history, diversity, and change. We’ll examine the history of English as it developed in England, the United States, and other parts of the world. We’ll explore the diversity of English, a language now used by millions (billions?) of speakers, yet paradoxically viewed by some in the US as a language so threatened that it needs government protection in the form of English-Only laws. We’ll touch on some ways English as it’s spoken in the USA differs from that spoken in the United Kingdom, Canada, the Caribbean, India, Nigeria, and other countries in which English is either an official language or a common second language. We will explore diversity historically, tracing the development of English dialects as well as attitudes about those dialects. Finally, we’ll look at language change, exploring the ways in which English, like any language, has evolved. My overall goal for the semester is that you’ll acquire historical perspectives on current English language issues, and that you’ll be able to use historical and current language reference works to answer questions you may have. G301 requires regular homework (with some choices about when it’s due), an individual project towards the end of the semester, and weekly in-class discussion or group problem-solving. Whether your primary interest is in writing.

G310 Social Speech Patterns
An introduction to English grammar and usage that studies the rhetorical impact of grammatical structures such as noun phrases, prepositional phrases, and different sentence patterns. This course considers language trends and issues, the role of correctness in discourse communities, and the relations between writing in context and descriptive and prescriptive grammars and usage guides.

TCM 32000  Written Communication in Science and Industry
Analysis of current writing practices in technology and science, especially in organizational settings. Practice in designing and preparing reports for a variety of purposes and audiences.

TCM 34000 Correspondence in Business and Industry
The development and application of strategies and skills for writing letters for business and industry in technology and engineering. Applications may include resumes and letters of application, informational and persuasive letters, and in-house memoranda.

TCM 35000 Visual Elements of Technical Documents
Methods and principles of illustrating technical reports and manuals, the role of the technical writer in the company, basics of visual design, visuals for manuals, visualization of technical data, and modern technology available to technical writers.

TCM 42500 Managing Document Quality
Examines and applies principles of creating technical publications with a focus on quality management of the process. Students will create effective publications by identifying and intervening at crucial points in the documentation cycle - planning, researching, designing, drafting, reviewing, testing, editing, and revising.

TCM 45000 Research Approaches for Technical and Professional Communication
Examines quantitative and qualitative research techniques practiced by professionals working in technical and business communication. Explores both primary (i.e., field) and secondary (i.e., library) research approaches for learning about content, audience, and publication design.

E398 Internship in English
A supervised internship in the use of English in a workplace. Apply during semester before desired internship.

E450 Capstone Seminar
This senior capstone for all English majors integrates students’ undergraduate study through writing and reading projects, faculty and student presentations, and creation of capstone portfolios. Students apply linguistic, literary, and rhetorical knowledge in culminating projects and learning portfolios. The course looks back at accomplishments and forward to postgraduation planning.

No iron spike can pierce a heart as icily as a period in the right place.  ~ Isaac Babel

Literature Concentration Requirements


English majors must take at least 15 hours of 300/400 level courses in the major. A minimum grade of C is required in each course in this concentration.  

Gateway Course (3 cr.)
L202 Literary Interpretation

Concentration Core (18 cr.):

English Experience (9 cr.):

Capstone Seminar (3 cr.)
Choose one:
- L440 Senior Seminar
- E450 Capstone Seminar
- L433 Conversations with Shakespeare

 


Interested in a Minor in Literature? Click here. Or, how about a Minor in Multicultureral Literature

No iron spike can pierce a heart as icily as a period in the right place.  ~ Isaac Babel

Literature Courses

L 105 Appreciation of Literature
This course is intended for non-majors and introduces the specific reading demands of poetry, drama, and short fiction. Rather than write papers, students complete a number of workshops which build an experiential connection with literature and place it in context with other humane arts. Students should complete the class with a better understanding of the communal and personal influences which help them make meaning from text.

L 115 Literature for Today
This course teaches prerequisite skills for subsequent English courses, and may be centered on literary themes more than generic reading demands. Students are expected to complete written assignments which may include individual essays or comprehensive portfolios. In addition to poetry, drama, and short fiction, the course also introduces the novel.

L202 Literary Interpretation
L202 introduces students to the values, habits, and best practices of interpreting literary works in conversation, class discussions, and written assignments.  It is also the gateway course for students in the Literature concentration within the English major.  Its main goals are: to introduce students to the processes of literary analysis and essay writing; to examine how literary works comment on social, moral, political, and philosophical issues of importance to their own and later times; and to reflect on what we do as interpreters of literature so that we can take conscious control of our skills and knowledge.

L203 Introduction to Drama
For anyone interested in the art of Theatre, English, or Communication Arts, it is essential to understand the basics of what we call ‘Drama.’  L203 is a class that talks about what it means to see and understand theatre, what it means to be in a play, and even what it means to write a play; but it’s more than that. We will also examine how to speak in public, how to use your body as a kind of language, and, in doing all of that, how to understand ourselves and our lives better.  This class will help you to become more aware of what happens in drama, how drama might be interpreted, and how the world can be better understood by experiencing drama from many different cultural perspectives.

L204 Introduction to Fiction
In L204 students study the ways and means and meanings of narrative literature, concentrating on the short story and modern novel. The main goals of the course are: (1) to learn about various types of fiction, its techniques, themes, and the terminology we use to discuss it; (2) to develop analytical skills as readers of fiction; and (3) to better enjoy reading stories and novels by better understanding how they work and what they intend to communicate.  Some sections have a thematic focus: see IUPUI Schedule of Classes.

L204 Introduction to Fiction online
This online version of L204 is delivered through Oncourse, IUPUI’s web teaching and learning environment, and requires basic computer skills such as word processing, use of the Internet, capacity to use or learn how to use discussion forums, Oncourse mail, and occasionally chatrooms. Students should be attentive readers, able to read and follow text instructions as well as capable of working at a regular pace in a course which requires consistent and regular submission of work as a substitute for class attendance. One required orientation meeting will take place, though you may make arrangements with the instructor to orient online. Not recommended for freshmen.

L205 Introduction to Poetry
L205 is for people who love poetry and for those who are afraid of it. It aims to give all students greater confidence and greater pleasure in approaching poems. Students will become familiar with formal elements of poetry-such as image, metaphor, language, voice, line and meter-and will read a wide variety of poems grouped according to convention and stylistic strategy. We will particularly focus on the rich traditions of the sonnet, ballad, and elegy.

L207 Women and Literature
This course centers on critical study of women writers in world literature.  Readings will cover a range of different world cultures and time periods.  Texts are selected from a variety of genres including poetry, short stories, novels, autobiography, and essays.  Study of literary works will be supplemented by discussion of theoretical issues and texts relating to gender, empowerment, and feminism.

L213 Literary Masterpieces
Students in L213 study major western literary works from the ancient world to the Renaissance.  This course provides students with an opportunity to become familiar with great works that are foundational for modern Western culture.  These ancient works still have an up-to-date impact on our lives since our core beliefs are still built, to a larger extent than is often realized, on a foundation established by these ancient, medieval, and Renaissance classics, including works of Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, and others.  Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills. 

L214 Literary Masterpieces II
L214 covers major Western literary works from the Renaissance to the twentieth century.  Texts are selected from a variety of genres and nations, with an emphasis on works that have been particularly famous and influential.  Works by Cervantes, Voltaire, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Mann, Ibsen, Kafka, and others are typically included.  Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills.  Non-English works will be read in English translation.

L213 Literary Masterpieces and L214 Literary Masterpieces II Online
The online versions of L213 and L214 are delivered through Oncourse, IUPUI’s web teaching and learning environment, and requires basic computer skills such as word processing, use of the Internet, capacity to use or learn how to use discussion forums, Oncourse mail, and occasionally chatrooms.  An on-campus orientation meeting will take place, though you may make arrangements with the instructor to orient online. Not recommended for freshmen. For a list of readings, see the course description for the classroom version. The online course will also include web lectures delivered in the Impatica format, interactive forum postings, self-assessment quizzes, two papers and two exams.

L220 Introduction to Shakespeare
"Not for an age, but for all time!" This class is designed to increase your enjoyment and understanding of Shakespeare’s plays by reading them in relation to performances of the plays, their social and historical settings, the current theory and criticism, and the development of the plays on stage and on film. We will cover only a few of Shakespeare’s thirty-eight plays, but we will examine the broad spectrum across which Shakespeare wrote for a popular audience: comedy, romance, history, and tragedy. In taking this approach, we will necessarily also examine William Shakespeare, the man, and the cultural environment of the Early Modern Period in which he wrote. We will watch some films and film clips and try to arrange at least one trip to see a live performance.

L245 Introduction to Caribbean Literature
Caribbean literature has become an important part of our increasingly globalized literature curriculum.  This course will introduce students to the basic themes and works of Caribbean literature. Specifically, we will examine the ways in which Caribbean writers present a colonial past and its effect on Caribbean culture in their attempts to "write back" to imperialist thought. We will examine the politics of decolonization and how writers construct and re-construct Caribbean cultures and identities.

L301 English Literature Survey I
L301 is a survey of British literature up to the eighteenth century. This was a period of exciting changes in English society and politics. It also produced some of England’s most renowned writers, including Geoffrey Chaucer, John Donne, Andrew Marvell, John Milton, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Alexander Pope, and Jonathan Swift. Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting to students, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills. This is a good class for teachers and potential graduate students.

L302 English Literature Survey II
L302 samples various literary forms—poems, prose, plays—as it maps the development of British literature through historical periods roughly defined as Romanticism, Victorianism, Modernism, and Post-modernism. Using writers from John Keats and Mary Prince through Samuel Beckett and Seamus Heaney, we will explore literary works both as unique productions of individual authors’ minds and as part of the larger literary and historical worlds of their time. In short, we’ll see where our literary present—and to some extent our society—comes from. This is a good class for teachers and potential graduate students.

L315 Major Plays of Shakespeare
This class is designed to increase your enjoyment and understanding of Shakespeare’s plays through a close reading of the play texts in relation to performance of the plays, their social and historical setting, current theory and criticism, and the development of the plays as dramatic performances, on stage and on film. We will cover only a few of Shakespeare’s thirty-eight plays, but we will examine the broad spectrum across which Shakespeare wrote for a popular audience: comedy, romance, history, and tragedy. In taking this approach, we will necessarily also examine Mr. William Shakespeare, the man, and the cultural milieu of the Early Modern Period in which he wrote. Because Shakespeare wrote his plays for performance, we will watch some films and film clips and try to arrange at least one trip to see a live performance.

L348 19th-Century British Fiction
This course samples from the era’s many genres of fiction.  Some types were built on previous eras-Romantic, the Gothic, the sentimental-while others were just emerging: the sensational novel, the realistic novel, detective fiction, and the mashup of these in the 1890’s aesthetic novel.  Students will meet lesser known writers who produced novels of sensation and sentimentality along with household names like Charles Dickens.  Creative writers may like the exposure to multiple genres; literature majors more interested in prose than in poetry can use this course in place of L302.  History majors/minors may deepen their cultural understanding of this period, which saw the rise of both democracy and the imperialism that affected so much of twentieth-century life.

L351 American Literature, 1800-1865
L351 examines American literature in the early national period, covering fiction, poetry, the slave narrative, and the essay. This thematic survey of transcendental, romantic, and domestic writers includes authors such as Irving, Emerson, Sedgewick, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Stowe, Melville, Poe, Douglass, and Whitman. The course introduces American Transcendentalism and Romanticism and situates non-canonical works in historical context.

L352 American Literature, 1870-1920
An historical survey of American literature from the end of the Civil War to 1920, L352 addresses the crisis of consciousness that beset writers in a period of rapid urban growth. The course covers the cultural contexts of Regionalism, Realism, and Naturalism with emphasis on psychological approaches to fiction and the secularization of literature. Authors may include Dickinson, James, Twain, Crane, Jewett, Chesnutt, Wharton, Howells, London, and Dreiser.

L354 American Literature Since 1914
This course begins with the American modernists and examines a representative selection of works in a variety of genres to emphasize the diversity of voices comprising twentieth-century American literature. One of our major goals is to consider the ways in which American literature both reflects and shapes our sense of what it means to be an American. Individual works are analyzed and placed within social, historical and cultural contexts. Although there are occasional short lectures, the primary format of the class is discussion.

L358 20th-Century American Fiction
This course considers fiction-both novels and short stories-beginning with the works of the American expatriates of the 1920s and ending in the contemporary period. Because the twentieth century has seen a great deal of experimentation in fiction (as well as in other literary and art forms), many of the works we will read will be experimental in form and content. Selections will include, among others, works of the expatriates, representatives of the Southern renascence and the African-American resurgence in contemporary literature. Our primary objectives will be: (1) to examine the development and diversity of fictional forms in the twentieth century; (2) to consider the social and historical forces that have affected the fiction writers of the twentieth century; and (3) to consider the achievements of the individual authors whose works we read.

L364 Native American Literature
This course introduces students to the breadth, complexity, and interdisciplinary nature of literature by Native American writers. We will attempt to answer two central questions as we engage with a variety texts: What are the cultural and ethical implications of transforming oral literatures performed for particular tribal audiences into written literatures in English? And what are the implications of unifying such a diverse body of oral and written literatures with the term "Native American"?  These questions naturally demand a study of primary works including fiction, poetry, and films. Authors we study may include N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, James Welch, and Louise Erdrich. We will supplement our readings of primary and secondary texts with films and a visit to the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.

L370 Recent Black American Writing
This course will examine black American literature written in the latter part of the twentieth century and the early twenty-first century. The literary texts we will read and discuss offer various representations of black life, often resisting stereotypical notions of "blackness." We will examine the various themes that arise in contemporary black literature as well as examine how these recent works illuminate the traditional themes of an African American literary tradition. Texts may include Walter Mosley’s Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, Bertice Berry’s Redemption Song, J. California Cooper’s A Piece of Mine, August Wilson’s Fences, Veronica Chambers’ Mama’s Girl, Coleson Whitehead’s The Intuitionist, and Sister Souljah’s The Coldest Winter Ever.

L372 Contemporary American Fiction
L372 examines the variety of fictional styles and themes that characterize late twentieth- and early twenty-first century American fiction.  We will read works of several sub-genres and cultural perspectives, ending with a work that will raise questions about "fictionality" itself.  We’ll consider each work on its individual literary merits, but we’ll also be looking at commonalities and differences between the various works.  We’ll also consider the ways in which contemporary fiction both builds on and departs from its literary ancestors.  Course papers will allow students to explore a specific work in more depth, while projects will connect course works with a larger context of some kind.

L373 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature: Philanthropy and Literature
L373 is a variable-title topics course covering various topics and literatures depending on the semester and instructor.  When taught as "Philanthropy and Literature," L373 examines the representations of philanthropy and voluntary action in literature (in works such as Major Barbara, A Christmas Carol, The Grapes of Wrath, The Good Woman of Setzuan and others) as well as the creation of literature as an act of giving. The course will explore the assumptions and methods appropriate for an interdisciplinary investigation such as literature and philanthropy and the dimensions of giving and voluntary action as they shape the personal and cultural lives of people, especially readers of literature. Discussions are likely to pursue questions regarding the values and perspectives that the study of literature and the study of philanthropy share.

L376 Literature for Adolescents
This course will focus on literature of the last fifty years when both modern teenagers and books designed specifically for them emerged. Reading fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and ‘zines, we will address how different genres represent and define the teenage experience. This literature not only reflects teen lives but also responds to concerns about teens’ reluctance to read and their changing literacies. The course will be of interest to those wishing an overview of recent reading, publishing, and writing trends. While thinking about what roles these books can play in secondary school classrooms, we will primarily analyze them as pieces of literature.

L378 Studies in Women and Literature
L378 builds on the more general knowledge presented in L207, Women and Literature. Providing an in-depth and topical focus on women and men in literature, the course invites students to consider variable and specialized topics of current interest in gender theory and criticism.  Sections of L378 have been offered in, for example, American domestic fiction by 19th-century women writers and in "Shakespeare’s Sisters"-women who wrote and performed drama and poetry in secrecy.

L379 Ethnic and Minority Literature of the United States
This course samples from the multicultural glory that is contemporary fiction in the United States. The syllabus will include works of various American-ethnic origins, including but not limited to Afghan-American, Chicano American, American Indian, Korean American, African American, Jewish American, and Latvian American authors.  If you want to know more about our country, you’ll have fun with the writers’ different perspectives and forms.

L381 Recent Writing: Indiana Authors
Indiana Authors surveys the state’s literary past for insights into its active life in the present. In search of confluences of place and authors’ lives and work, we read Hoosier poets, fiction writers, and essayists. Some of them shine among the most luminous in 20th-century letters-Dreiser, Tarkington, Vonnegut, Young. All offer unique visions of the state and the state of the world. Collectively their voices inform us about Indiana’s role in the progress of American literature.

L382 Fiction of the Non-Western World: 20th-Century African Fiction
The decolonization of Africa in the 1950s and 1960s sparked an explosion of African literature that continues to this day.  This literature is vibrant, skillful, and deeply concerned with the social issues facing African nations.  This course will introduce students to an exciting range of African fiction written in English from countries such as Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, South Africa, and Botswana.  Emphasis throughout the course will be on making the works accessible and interesting to students, relating them to historical contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills. 

L384 Studies in American Culture: Comics in American Culture
A survey of American comic art and artists, this course is primarily concerned with how comics developed and matured as a distinctively American art form, reflecting and commenting on American society in a variety of narrative forms: comic strips, web comics, comic books, and graphic novels. The class will examine the birth and death of the Comic Code, and it will focus on the changing trends in content and theme that developed in the mid 1980’s, the British Invasion, and how this affected the various genres within American comics currently.

L384 Studies in American Culture: The Harlem Renaissance
This course progresses through an intense study of the Harlem Renaissance period from 1919 to 1940.  The class covers the historic, political, and social aspects of the movement and includes both critical and literary texts.  Texts include but are not limited to the poetry of Countee Cullen and Langston Hughes, the critical work of Alain Locke, Arthur Schomburg, and George Schuyler, and the literature of Nella Larsen, W.E.B. Dubois, Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, and Jean Toomer.  The course also integrates contemporary critical work on the period to provide context, but these texts will be chosen for their accessibility to students.

L385 Science Fiction
A survey of British and American science fiction in the twentieth century, L385 will examine the various trends, themes, and subgenres in speculative fiction-from elements of fantasy to hard/technical science fiction. As a class we will discuss traditional novels and at least one graphic novel. Some readings will change but this is an example of what to expect: The Book of Dreams by Jack Vance, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick, Neuromancer by William Gibson, To Your Scattered Bodies Go by Philip Jose Farmer, Watchmen by Alan Moore.

L390 Children’s Literature
Children’s books present an interesting paradox: they are written by adults for an audience of children. As such, these books often tell us as much about adults as they do about children. Moreover, as the Harry Potter phenomenon suggests, adults enjoy children’s books as much as (and sometimes more than) children. Thinking about the many different audiences of children’s books, we will consider books that highlight how adults have shaped social constructions of childhood over the last three centuries. By tracing how different writers have interpreted the same themes, we will consider how attitudes about children as intellectuals and emerging citizens have shifted over time.

L406/L606 Topics in African-American Literature
Useful for majors/minors in Africana Studies, education, English, and history, this variable course may focus on a single writer like the novelist and Nobel prize winner Toni Morrison; on a single topic such as the slave narrative; or on a variety of genres (plays, poetry, fiction, films) that comprise the traditions of African American literature.

L411 Literature and Society
L411 is a variable-title course focusing on the relations between literature and social beliefs, practices, and histories.  Topics will vary depending on the semester and instructor

L411 Literature and Society: South African Literature and Society
South Africa’s tortured history has been a focus of international attention for much of the twentieth century. From the 1948 elections, which inaugurated the period of formal apartheid (strict racial segregation), to the 1994 elections, which marked the end of apartheid and the beginning of majority black rule, it has been a history of racism, violence, hope, and struggle. This course aims to integrate historical and political study with the study of South Africa’s rich literary tradition, which includes Nobel Prize winners Nadine Gordimer and J. M. Coetzee and many other important writers of various ethnic and ideological backgrounds. Goals of the course will include: (1) to develop methods of reading that pay attention to issues of cultural difference, power, resistance, and negotiation; (2) to become more familiar with the history and literature of South Africa by examining a group of narratives and their historical contexts; (3) to improve students’ skills in analyzing and writing about literature through frequent writing and feedback.

L411 Literature and Society: Working Class Literature
This course discusses what constitutes working class literature in a variety of genres (songs as well as texts) and how working-class aesthetics might differ from middle- and upper-class aesthetics.  Authors and performers might include, for example, Tillie Olsen, Johnny Cash, August Wilson, Bruce Springsteen, Luis J. Rodriguez. An upper-level course designed for majors and minors in English, history, labor studies, education, and the Masarachia program, L411 can be used as a capstone in the literature concentration. 

L433 Conversations with Shakespeare
This course studies the phenomenon of literary intertextuality by focusing on a group of works that are based on the plays of William Shakespeare.  Students will compare Shakespeare texts with more recent novels, plays, poems, and films that allude to or incorporate some aspect of Shakespeare’s art.  These later works engage in "conversations" with Shakespeare by using Shakespearean "materials" (characters, settings, plots, verbal echoes, etc.) in new ways and in different historical and social contexts.  The result is usually a complex blend of homage to Shakespeare, criticism and disagreement, and use of the past to create social commentary for the present.  Our main goals in this course will be: (1) to develop ways of analyzing and understanding intertextual works that do justice to the complexities of the different texts and time periods; (2) to understand some of the workings of "Shakespeare" as a cultural institution or icon; (3) to develop cross-cultural understanding of the meanings and uses of Shakespeare in different times and places.

L440 Senior Seminar
L440 is a variable-title course for advanced undergraduates covering various topics and literatures depending on the semester and instructor.  Each section follows a seminar format, with extensive discussion of critical topics.  L440 fulfills the capstone requirement for students majoring in Literature.  Topics may include Poetry, Gender, and Mid-Century Modernism, Dickens and Eliot, Coetzee and Rushdie, the Slave Narrative, Austen and Wharton, James Joyce, Hawthorne and Melville, Southern Literature, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison.

L478/M592 Literature and Medicine
A course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in English and the Medical Humanities, L478/ M592 explores the medical world in literature and the arts, in popular culture, and through the institution of the hospital. Students explore medical subjects across a range of genres, including the case and the pathography. Illness narrative is often a focus.

L495 Individual Readings in English
These courses, available for 1-3 credits, allow you to pursue an individual interest or topic that is not available through regularly offered courses. You need to develop a proposal, detailing what you want to study or write, and discuss it with a faculty member with some expertise in that area. Remember that faculty members have limited time for directing such independent study; they are most likely to work with a student they have previously had in a class and/or a student who has a well-developed proposal and a strong motivation. Students must be authorized for these courses by a faculty member, who will request a specific section number.


 

Note:  For a complete listing of courses with days and times, refer to the IUPUI Schedule of Classes. These course descriptions are meant as a general guide to aid in your course selection; syllabi, textbooks, and requirements are given on the first day of class. In some cases, an instructor’s name is given, and that means the description that follows applies when that instructor teaches the course.

No iron spike can pierce a heart as icily as a period in the right place.  ~ Isaac Babel

Opportunities in Literature

Modern Language Association

A group of more than 30,000 literary and cultural scholars from 100 countries who teach English and world languages. The most significant organization in the US governing literary study since 1883, MLA hosts an annual conference in December, where research is presented and search committees meet to interview job candidates. MLA publishes four major journals including PMLA and PROFESSION, publishes about 20 books per year, and produces the MLA Bibliography—the only comprehensive list of studies on language and literature available in print or on-line.

Midwest Modern Language Association

The regional branch of the larger MLA, which hosts an annual conference and consists of about 3,000 memebers. M/MLA is the largest regional territory of the MLA. The organization also sponsors the M/MLA Journal.

American Literature Association

An organization of specialists in American literature since 1989, the ALA is dedicated to exploring the diversity of American letters and hosts an annual conference of approximately 800 scholars.

 
There are at least 30 significant refereed journals in literary and cultural studies. Among the most well known are PMLA (Publication of the Modern Language Association), which is the premiere journal in literary study; American Literature, the journal of record for path-breaking work in American literature; American Quarterly, a journal devoted to cultural, interdisplinary, and transnational approaches to the study of the Americas; and Critical Inquiry, the premiere journal for literary criticism and theory.

Language is by its very nature a communal thing; that is, it expresses never the exact thing but a compromise -- that which is common to you, me, and everybody.  ~ Thomas Earnest Hulme

Literature Faculty


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