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  Madam Walker Lecture series Flyer

Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition

"Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition." Thursday, October 9, 2014: IUPUI Hine Hall A public event to observe and assess the publication of the first scholarly edition of The Heroic Slave, the only significant work of fiction by the 19th century’s best-known African American: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). A runaway slave, Douglass rose to become an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist, and diplomat. Schedule: 11:00AM-12:00PM Registration 12:00PM-1:00PM Opening Luncheon Welcoming Remarks Dr. Karen Dace, Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Dr. Marianne Wokeck, Director of the Institute of American Thought Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun, Chair of Africana Studies Introductory Remarks by Symposium Organizer Professor John R. Kaufman-McKivigan, Editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers, IUPUI 1:15PM-3:00PM Session 1: The Heroic Slave in History Moderator: V.P. Franklin, Editor of the Journal of African American History "The Nonfiction Madison Washington: How Does He Compare to the Character in Frederick Douglass's "Heroic Slave" and Similar Civil-War-Era Fiction?" Stanley Harrold, Professor of History, South Carolina State University "Autographs for Freedom: The Heroic Slave’s Abolitionist Audience" John R. Kaufman-McKivigan, Mary O’Brien Gibson Professor of History, IUPUI and Alex Smith, Research Assistant, Frederick Douglass Papers "Insurrection as Righteous Rebellion in The Heroic Slave and Beyond" L. Diane Barnes, Professor of History, Youngstown State University 3:30PM-4:45PM Session 2: The Heroic Slave in Literature Moderator: Robert S. Levine, Professor of English, University of Maryland "Self-reflexivity, Aesthetic Experimentation, and Transforming andlsquo;Chattel Records’ into andlsquo;Works of Art’ in The Heroic Slave" Celeste-Marie Bernier, University of Nottingham/ King's College London "A Mutinous Fiction: Frederick Douglass’s andlsquo;The Heroic Slave.’" Deborah McDowell, Director, Carter G. Woodson Institute and Alice Griffin Professor of Literary Studies, University of Virginia "A Truth Stranger than Fiction: Frederick Douglass’s Aesthetics and the Early African American Novel" Ivy Wilson, Associate Professor of English and Director of American Studies, Northwestern University 5:00-5:45PM Plenary Session "Madison Washington, Frederick Douglass, and the African American Revolutionary Tradition." John W. Stauffer, Harvard University Hosted by the Frederick Douglass Papers, Institute for American Thought, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Africana Studies Program, Department of History, Department of English, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and Indiana Humanities. Free and open to the public. Registration is required. For information or to register: douglass@iupui.edu

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Frederick Douglass's THE HEROIC SLAVE and the American Revolutionary Tradition

Friday, October 10, 2014, The Jewel Center A public event to observe and assess the publication of the first scholarly edition of The Heroic Slave, the only significant work of fiction by the 19th century’s best-known African American: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). A runaway slave, Douglass rose to become an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist, and diplomat. This event is held in conjunction with the Second Annual Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Public Lecture and Workshop. Schedule: 8:00-9:00AM Continental Breakfast 9:15AM-9:45AM Welcome Welcoming Remarks Dr. Karen Dace, Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, IUPUI Bessie House-Soremekun, Chair of Africana Studies program, IUPUI John Kaufmann-McKivigan, Editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers, IUPUI 10:00AM-11:00AM Ist Session: "Slave Rebels throughout American History" Panelists: L. Diane Barnes, Professor of History, Youngstown State University; John R. Kaufmann-McKivigan, Professor of History, IUPUI; and Stanley Harrold, Professor of History, South Carolina State University 11:15AM-12:15PM 2nd Session: "The African American Literature of Slavery" Panelists: Jane Schultz, Professor of English, IUPUI; Robert S. Levine, Professor of English, University of Maryland; Celeste-Marie Bernier, University of Nottingham/ King's College London 12:30PM-2:30PM Luncheon and Awards Presentations "The Power to Define: History, Scholarship, and Social Change." Luncheon Address by V.P. Franklin, Editor of the Journal of African American History Awards Presentation by Bessie House-Soremekun, Chair of Africana Studies Program Hosted by the Frederick Douglass Papers, Institute for American Thought, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Africana Studies Program, Department of History, Department of English, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and Indiana Humanities. Free and open to the public. Registration is required. For information or to register: douglass@iupui.edu

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The Future History of the Book: Time, Attention, Convention - John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities

The Future History of the Book: Time, Attention, Convention Kathleen Fitzpatrick Director of Scholarly Communication Modern Language Association Anxieties abound regarding the ostensible obsolescence of the book. Exploring whether the book is in fact becoming obsolete — and what it might mean if it were — requires thinking distinctly about the specific material form of the book (the codex) and about the content that it has long carried. If the form were to change — becoming digital, for instance — would our interactions with the content still make the book (if not exactly as we have known it) a viable vector for the cultural interactions the codex has supported? Would it be possible for us to find the powerful identification with the electronic book that we long have had with the codex book? And what might need to happen in order to effect such a transfer of our affections? 5:00  Reception 6:00  Lecture RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu Presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts

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2015 Taylor Symposium

Details to follow. Hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Office of Development and External Affairs and the Department of Religious Studies

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A Celebration of Scholarship: The Liberal Arts Honors Convocation

A Celebration of Scholarship: The Liberal Arts Honors Convocation Student Recipient Registration at 2:15 pm General Registration and Reception at 2:30 pm Program begins promptly at 3:00 pm Further details to follow. Hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Office of Development and External Affairs

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